The Rat and the Tiger

Overview

Even though one is just a tiny little fellow and the other is a big tough guy, rat and tiger are best friends. they have lots of fun playing together, even though tiger is a bit of a bully. when they play cowboys, rat always has to be the bad guy. when they share a snack, rat always gets the smaller piece. but one day, tiger takes the bullying too far, and rat decides that he’s not going take it anymore. rat stands up for himself and refuses to be tiger’s friend until tiger learns to play fair and square. with ...

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Overview

Even though one is just a tiny little fellow and the other is a big tough guy, rat and tiger are best friends. they have lots of fun playing together, even though tiger is a bit of a bully. when they play cowboys, rat always has to be the bad guy. when they share a snack, rat always gets the smaller piece. but one day, tiger takes the bullying too far, and rat decides that he’s not going take it anymore. rat stands up for himself and refuses to be tiger’s friend until tiger learns to play fair and square. with appealing illustrations and a simple text, Keiko Kasza delivers an important message about friendship in this heartwarming story.

In his friendship with Rat, Tiger takes advantage and plays the bully because of his greater size, but one day Rat stands up for his rights.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
``I'm a rat, just a tiny little rat,'' says the diminutive narrator of this piquant tale about friendship. Towering above him is his best buddy, Tiger, ``a big tough fellow.'' Rat explains that the two ``used to have a little problem.'' Whenever they played cowboys, Rat always had to be the bad guy. And whenever they shared a doughnut, he was left with a small piece while his buddy received the Tiger's share. But one day the big bully goes too far. When he kicks over the elaborate block castle Rat painstakingly built, the latter declares that Tiger is no longer his friend. And the stubborn little fellow makes sure that his companion has truly mended his selfish ways before he declares them pals once again. As in her past books, Kasza ( The Pigs' Picnic ; A Mother for Choco ) here delivers a valuable lesson cunningly and effectively. With their drolly expressive faces, Tiger and Rat pass on the importance of sharing, playing fairly and treating others as you'd like to be treated. As a bonus, Kasza adds a characteristically clever tangle at story's end. Ages 4-8. (Mar.)
School Library Journal
PreS-Gr 2-- Children will root for the underdog in this familiar scenario. Because of his larger stature, Tiger tends to bully his friend Rat, forcing him to play the bad guy in cowboy games, allotting him only a tiny piece of their shared doughnut, and sending him into the brambles to pick a flower. After each episode, Rat philosophically states, ``What could I say? I'm just a tiny little rat.'' Finally, the rodent reaches his limit, speaks his mind, and is immediately fearful of the consequences. But Tiger is shame-faced, not angry, and makes amends to restore the balance in their friendship. Bright, watercolor illustrations set against a white background depict appealing characters with wonderfully expressive features. A simple text and repetitive plot elements make this a good choice both for story times and for beginning readers. --Joy Fleishhacker, New York Public Library
Emily Melton
Rat likes to play with Tiger, but Tiger is always taking advantage of him. If they play cowboys, Tiger gets to be the good guy. If they have a snack, Tiger gets the larger share. Rat wishes he'd get to be the good guy or have the larger piece once in a while, but Tiger's bigger, so Tiger gets his way. One day, though, Tiger knocks over the castle Rat spent hours building, and Rat yells at Tiger, telling him how angry he feels about the way Tiger treats him and threatening not to be his friend anymore. Tiger does everything he can to make amends, and Rat agrees to be his friend again--but only if he and Tiger can share and take turns! Appealingly written and deftly illustrated, this gently humorous book is an entertaining and delightful story of friendship. It can also be a useful tool for helping children learn that it's okay to be angry if someone tries to take advantage of you; that you don't have to tolerate being bullied; that sometimes people don't know how you feel unless you tell them; and that learning to share and take turns are important in a good friendship. A worthwhile acquisition that children and parents will check out over and over again.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780142409008
  • Publisher: Penguin Group (USA) Incorporated
  • Publication date: 4/19/2007
  • Format: Mass Market Paperback
  • Edition description: Reissue
  • Pages: 32
  • Sales rank: 610,056
  • Age range: 3 - 8 Years
  • Product dimensions: 8.26 (w) x 9.50 (h) x 0.11 (d)

Meet the Author

Keiko Kasza

Keiko Kasza was born on a small Japanese island in the Inland Sea of Japan. She grew up in a typical Japanese extended family with her parents, two brothers, and grandparents. Uncles, aunts, and cousins also lived nearby. "All the steps I took growing up were very normal," Ms. Kasza says. "The only unusual thing I did was go to college in the United States." She graduated with a degree in graphic design from California State University at Northridge. Ms. Kasza married an American, and the United States has been her home ever since.

After publishing five children's books in Japan and working as a graphic designer for fourteen years, Ms. Kasza decided in 1988 to devote her time to picture books. She says, "Having two small boys and two professions was too much to handle."

Ms. Kasza admires many great picture-book creators, such as Leo Lionni and Maurice Sendak, but says that the work of Arnold Lobel has influenced her the most. The subtle humor and warmth he created in his books continues to inspire me," she says. "I often go back to his work when I get discouraged or lose confidence."

Ms. Kasza compares the process of making a book to acting on stage under the lights:
"I become the character that I'm working on at that moment. I pretend that I'm a bird looking for a mother, or a pig trying to impress his girlfriend. When I'm acting, I'm a child myself."

Ms. Kasza's ambition is not to create a hundred books, but to "create one really good book that will be kept on the family bookshelves for generations, although a hundred really good books would be even better, of course!"

Keiko Kasza lives in Indiana with her husband and two sons.

copyright © 2000 by Penguin Putnam Books for Young Readers. All rights reserved.

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