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Rats on the Roof
     

Rats on the Roof

by James Marshall
 
"In seven illustrated stories . . . this Caldecott Honor artist introduces an array of lively anthropomorphized animals in amusing predicaments."--Publishers Weekly

Rats can’t dance, right?
 
Wrong. Here are seven silly stories about some very unusual creatures. Meet a sheep who can’t read (but thinks he can), an owl who

Overview

"In seven illustrated stories . . . this Caldecott Honor artist introduces an array of lively anthropomorphized animals in amusing predicaments."--Publishers Weekly

Rats can’t dance, right?
 
Wrong. Here are seven silly stories about some very unusual creatures. Meet a sheep who can’t read (but thinks he can), an owl who outwits a brontosaurus, and a goose who thinks her wolf neighbors are canaries.
 
“Those just beginning to read chapter books should find that this is just the thing to tickle their funnybones.”—School Library Journal

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
In seven illustrated stories of varying size and levels of sophistication, this Caldecott Honor artist introduces an array of lively anthropomorphized animals in amusing predicaments. Otis and Sophie Dog cannot sleep because of the cavorting rats that dance on the roof of their house. When the couple advertises for a cat to oust the intruders, a pompous, nattily dressed tomcat with some outrageous demands applies for the job. Other tales deal with a wolf who goes to great lengths to ensnare two unsuspecting sheep; a conniving cat tossed out on his ear after crashing a mouse wedding; and a vain frog who abruptly ceases to brag about his ``magnificent legs'' when he reads a recipe that calls for sauteed frogs' legs. As always, Marshall charges his text and pictures with a zany humor that will bewitch adults and children alike. Ages 6-10. ( June )
Children's Literature - Mary Quattlebaum
As young readers become more skilled, they can turn happily to Marshall's chapter books. In this story, a vain frog, two dogs, plagued at night by dancing rats, and a mouse thankful for his heroic bride are but a few of the characters which are sure to tickle the fancy of young and old alike.
School Library Journal
Gr 2-4-- This collection of seven silly stories is written for slightly older readers than Marshall's usual fare, but his high-spirited wackiness is recognizable. Each concerns the foibles of animals and their various ways of outwitting each other. In the title story, Otis and Sophie Dog have had a sleepless night filled with ``the sound of little dancing feet and shrill musical instruments,'' and decide they need a cat. In the end, though, the rats leave the roof for reasons other than the Dogs or readers expect. In other tales, sheep escape the wolf in spite of their stupidity; a mouse bride frightens an intrusive cat; an owl deters an tree-chomping brontosaurus; a swan is rescued from a fox despite her bad judgment; a frog loudly admires his own legs until he discovers they can be sauteed; and a goose unwittingly befriends new wolf neighbors. The black-and-white illustrations are in perfect tune with the spirit of the tellings. Those just beginning to read chapter books should find that this is just the thing to tickle their funnybones. --Carolyn Jenks, Oyster River Elementary School, Durham, NH

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780140386462
Publisher:
Penguin Young Readers Group
Publication date:
05/28/1997
Series:
Puffin Chapters Series
Edition description:
Reprint
Pages:
80
Sales rank:
538,665
Product dimensions:
5.08(w) x 7.75(h) x 0.20(d)
Lexile:
520L (what's this?)
Age Range:
7 - 10 Years

Meet the Author

James Marshall was born in San Antonio, Texas, and grew up sixteen miles outside of the town on the family farm. His father, who worked for the railroad, had his own dance band in the thirties and appeared on the radio. His mother, also musical, sang in the church choir. So it wasn't surprising when Jim considered playing the viola for a career and received a scholarshipto attend the New England Conservatory of Music in Boston. But during an airplane trip he was jerked out of his seat and injured his hand, and that was the end of his musical career.

He returned to San AntonioCollege and later Trinity, where he studied French under Harry Allard, his future collaborator. After moving East, Jim graduated from Southern ConnecticutState University with a degree in history and French. The French major somehow wound up trying to teach Spanish in a Catholic school in Boston. Before long he was looking for a new profession.

On a fateful summer afternoon in 1971 James Marshall lay on his hammock drawing pictures. His mother was inside the house watching Who's Afraid of Virginia Wolf on TV. The strident voices of the movie's protagonists, George and Martha, split the quiet air, and as the sketches began to take shape, history was made ... and James Marshall never had to look for another profession.

And so, with" tongue-in cheek" Jim Marshall began his career and became one of the most prolific and successful author/illustrators of children's books. He is best known for his series on the mischievous exploits of Fox, a debonair, lazy showoff; the uproarious adventures of the two Cut-Ups, Spud and Joe; George and Martha; and the misadventures of the Stupidfamily.

The Washington Post said in a recent review of his work, "There are few better writers and illustrators for children now than Marshall. Certainly there is no one else working today who more successfully captures the child's point of view than does the creator of George and Martha and the Stupids". The New York Times said about the Fox books: "The miracle of Mr.Marshall's work is that so often his stories are as profound as they are simple". He illustrated new versions of many children's classics, including Goldilocks and the Three Bears, for which he received a Caldecott Honor, Red Riding Hood, The Three Little Pigs, and Hansel and Gretel.

In an interview with Texas Monthly, Jim Marshall said about his work: "People have very oddideas of what a children's writer should be like. Children always expect me to look like a hippopotamus and adults assume that by nature I have to be a little off the wall".

James Marshall died in October of 1992. He divided his time between an apartment in the Chelsea district of New York and his home in Mansfield Hollow Connecticut.

copyright ? 2000 by Penguin Putnam Books for Young Readers. All rights reserved.

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