Rattlesnakes

Rattlesnakes

by Heather L. Montgomery
     
 

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Two hikers take an early morning walk along a desert path. Suddenly they hear a rattling sound and spot a rattlesnake coiled in front of them. Discover how rattlesnakes use their rattles to warn enemies, along with much more about these desert dwellers.

Overview

Two hikers take an early morning walk along a desert path. Suddenly they hear a rattling sound and spot a rattlesnake coiled in front of them. Discover how rattlesnakes use their rattles to warn enemies, along with much more about these desert dwellers.

Editorial Reviews

School Library Journal
Gr 3–4—Though narrowly focused, these introductions offer a crowd-pleasing combination of relatively substantial information—including specialized terms (ectotherm, neurotoxin) that are consistently defined nearby—with sometimes-thrilling photographs of snakes chowing down on hapless prey or themselves becoming prey to larger predators. Enhancements include range maps and relevant topical excursions in sidebars. These are good choices to complement broader sources on these ever-popular reptiles.
Children's Literature - Phyllis Kennemer
Rattlesnakes live in every state in the continental U.S. except Maine. Arizona has the most species. These snakes vary in size from 1 foot to 8 feet in length. Diamondback rattlesnakes carry enough venom to kill eight people. The snake's rattle provides the most useful warning system of all creatures. The rattles at the end of the tail create a buzzing sound intended to scare predators away. Because these snakes generally live in deserts and hot areas, they usually stay undercover when the sun is out and hunt in the dark. Heat-seeking pits on the sides of their faces detect the warmth of their prey, telling the snake where to strike. In spite of their rattles, these snakes have many enemies, including alligators, badgers, skunks, hawks, and roadrunners. Humans, however, kill more of these snakes than predators do. They are killed for their skins and rattles and sometimes perish in fires lit in their dens while they are sleeping. Rattlesnakes have, therefore, become endangered. Scientists are studying ways to help them survive and some concerned groups are teaching people to treat these snakes with respect. Large, full-color photographs support the text and aid in understanding. Includes a glossary, a bibliography, websites, and an index; a good choice for young researchers. Part of the "Wild about Snakes" series. Reviewer: Phyllis Kennemer, Ph.D.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781429662581
Publisher:
Capstone Press
Publication date:
02/01/2011
Series:
Wild about Snakes Series
Pages:
32
Sales rank:
1,176,324
Product dimensions:
6.80(w) x 8.80(h) x 0.20(d)
Lexile:
IG860L (what's this?)
Age Range:
8 - 14 Years

Meet the Author

In her books for young readers, Heather L. Montgomery shares her passion for nature. During her 20 years of outdoor education, Heather has unearthed many mysteries – from snake tongues to slurping bugs; the more bizarre, the better. Nature’s riddles led her to obtain a B.S. in biology and M.S. in environmental education. You can find more questions that have perplexed her in Wild Discoveries: Wacky New Animals, The Case of the Missing Arctic Fox and Other True Animals Stores for You to Solve and Mummies: Truth and Rumors. Heather lives in Alabama with her husband, cat, and dog.

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