Overview

Raveling is a brilliant thriller about two brothers, their mother, and the sad fact of their little sister's unsolved disappearance twenty years earlier. One of the brothers, Pilot, has come back home to take care of his aging mother, but his own mental state has not been stable since his sister vanished. He is determined at last to find out the truth -- but for every step he takes nearer the facts of that long-ago night, the less he trusts reality. And by the time he finds one incontrovertible piece of evidence,...
See more details below
Raveling

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK
  • NOOK HD/HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$10.99
BN.com price

Overview

Raveling is a brilliant thriller about two brothers, their mother, and the sad fact of their little sister's unsolved disappearance twenty years earlier. One of the brothers, Pilot, has come back home to take care of his aging mother, but his own mental state has not been stable since his sister vanished. He is determined at last to find out the truth -- but for every step he takes nearer the facts of that long-ago night, the less he trusts reality. And by the time he finds one incontrovertible piece of evidence, even Pilot cannot be sure what it really means.
Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble
Our Review
Good first novels are always cause for celebration, and the current year, though barely past the half-way mark, has already offered us several: Sheldon Siegel's Special Circumstances, Andrew Pyper's Lost Girls, and Stephen Horn's In Her Defense, to name only a few. The latest addition to this distinguished group of debuts is Peter Moore Smith's Raveling, an ambitious, accomplished novel that operates successfully on a number of levels: as a thriller, as an unsparing account of a family undone by grief and loss, and as a complex experiment in narrative point of view.

Raveling tells the story of the Airie family of rural New York, a family torn apart by a senseless, unresolved tragedy. Twenty years before the primary narrative begins, the youngest of the Aerie children, seven-year-old Fiona, disappears during the course of a crowded, drunken Labor Day party. Her body is never found and, in spite of a massive, protracted investigation, no one is ever implicated in her disappearance. Two decades later, Fiona remains a troubling presence, haunting the surviving members of her family, and transforming the novel into a kind of realistic, non-traditional ghost story.

In the aftermath of Fiona's disappearance, the Aerie family literally unravels. The parents -- Hannah, a physical therapist, and James, a pilot with a history of infidelity -- eventually divorce. The youngest son, nine-year-old Pilot, begins a lifelong process of psychological withdrawal. Following a bizarre episode in which he sees himself as the Wolf Boy -- a creature bereft of language and disconnected from his own species -- he settles into a less dramatic series of personal failures, ending up as a homeless drifter living on the beaches of Southern California. Only Eric, the oldest Aerie sibling, flourishes, breezing through medical school and establishing a successful, lucrative practice as a brain surgeon.

As the novel begins, life in the Aerie family has just taken another turn for the worse. Hannah, the mother, has begun to experience symptoms -- possibly psychosomatic -- of deteriorating vision. At first, she sees ghostly double images of everything. Eventually, the world becomes a blur, and all she can see with any clarity is another kind of ghost: Fiona, whose image takes up residence in the Aerie household. At about this time, Pilot, rescued by Eric from the beaches of California, returns to his childhood home and suffers a full-blown psychotic episode. He wanders into the woods behind his home and spends three days in a state of complete catatonia, after which he is formally diagnosed as schizophrenic, and placed in the care of a clinical psychologist named Katherine De Quincy-Joy.

Pilot emerges from this psychotic interlude convinced that Eric, for unknown reasons, murdered Fiona and hid her body. Pilot also believes he has proof of Eric's guilt: a child's sneaker and a bloody knife he claims to have found beneath Eric's bed on the morning after Fiona's disappearance. But Pilot, who is obviously delusional, can't remember where he stashed the evidence. And neither he nor the reader can be absolutely certain that his disordered memories are real.

Uncertainty is, in fact, the animating principle of this novel. Everything that happens in Raveling -- everything we see, hear, and think we understand -- is filtered through the clouded perspective of Pilot Aerie, the quintessential unreliable narrator. Is Eric Aerie really a killer, or is he a misunderstood savior? Is Pilot really a bone-fide schizophrenic, or is he the victim of an artificial, drug-induced psychosis? Could Pilot himself have murdered Fiona in a forgotten moment of psychotic rage? These are among the many questions that dominate the novel, and Smith withholds the answers until the very end, leading us through his dense, carefully constructed narrative maze with the ease and assurance of a natural-born novelist.

By any reasonable standards, Raveling is a remarkable debut, an intelligent, original creation that is alternately moving and suspenseful, disorienting and illuminating. With exquisite deliberation, Smith unearths the buried fragments of an excruciating domestic tragedy. At the same time, he shows us how the world looks from the constantly shifting perspective of a damaged young man struggling to achieve clarity, closure, and a lost sense of coherence. All in all, it's an impressive performance, and announces the arrival of a gifted new novelist who takes large risks and offers equally large rewards. Raveling is the real thing, and I urge you to give it a try. This one is simply too good to pass by.

--Bill Sheehan

Barnes & Noble Guide to New Fiction
When the sister of James Airie, a diagnosed schizophrenic, disappears, his family unravels. Now, twenty years later, he's ready to "ravel everything back." Some readers found it "tense, engaging, and suspenseful - an extraordinary read." "I was entangled until the end." "A fascinating combination of mystery and family drama." "I read the last 100 pages in one sitting and switched on my answering machine. You'll want to read it undisturbed." A few found it "too quirky and contrived."
Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
This first novel depends a great deal on gimmicks. The hero, from whose disturbed point of view much of the story is told, is the oddly named Pilot Airie (his father was an airline pilot). Diagnosed as a schizophrenic, his life has been off the rails ever since his younger sister, Fiona, disappeared mysteriously during a drunken party his parents threw during his childhood. His older brother, Eric, is a cool, collected neurosurgeon; his mother is a quondam medical specialist, whose eyesight seems to be unaccountably vanishing and whose mental state is increasingly disoriented. The overriding question, to which an attractive young psychotherapist, the elaborately named Katherine Jane De Quincey-Joy, must address herself, as she treats Pilot and begins an affair with Eric, is: whatever happened to Fiona 20 years ago, and can she do anything about it? The problem with much of this fitfully gripping, but just as often irritating, book is that much of the action is seen through Pilot's eyes, and he is a notoriously unreliable witness; he also appears to be omnipresent and all-knowing, which makes him a convenient substitute for the author. There is some vivid writing, and a certain eerie atmosphere is created around this weird family. But Moore Smith seems so intent on tricking the reader--innumerable red herrings are cast before us as to the real guilt in Fiona's disappearance--that one tends to lose patience with the whole proceeding. When even the dead Fiona is granted a narrative voice, briefly, about her grisly demise, it seems that authorial license has overrun the mark. Moore Smith has talent--his evocation of the trauma created over the years by Fiona's fate is telling--but his book is too disorganized and ill-focused to be an effective thriller, and too determined to provide some lurid chills to be the imaginative literary fiction it aspires to. (July) Copyright 2000 Cahners Business Information.|
Library Journal
Though revolving around the 20-year-old unsolved disappearance of a young girl, Smith's exceptional first novel is foremost a tale of family. Since his sister's vanishing, diagnosed schizophrenic Pilot Airie has had plenty of time to question his sanity and wonder if he truly recalls what happened on the evening of her disappearance. With the help of Katherine, the psychologist appointed to help him after a recent episode, Pilot attempts to remember that fateful night to begin his own healing process. While Pilot's account is the centerpiece of the story, each member of his family must undergo a catharsis: the control-freak brother, the mother who can't accept the breakup of her family, and the distant father who can't stop blaming himself for his daughter's disappearance. This wonderfully simple, engaging, and well-written story deserves a spot in public library fiction collections. [Previewed in Prepub Alert, LJ 3/15/00.]--Craig Shufelt, Gladwin Cty. Lib., MI Copyright 2000 Cahners Business Information.\
Vanessa V. Friedman
Slowly, almost hypnotically, the strands of the family tragedy interweave toward a resolution that's satisfying on both a narrative and moral level.
Entertainment Weekly
Kirkus Reviews
A classy suspense debut pitting two men against each other in that struggle between brothers that's as old as the Bible. In this version, you're not quite sure who's Cain and who's Abel until the author is ready to let you figure it out. Eric Fairlie and younger brother Pilot (named by their flier father in an early attempt to influence career choice) furnish little evidence that they share a gene pool. Eric is brilliant, handsome, and a successful neurosurgeon while Pilot is not noticeably handsome, brilliant, or by any measure successful. Diagnosed a schizophrenic, Pilot battles to stay tuned into reality—to keep his feet on the ground, as it were, in an ironic subversion of Dad's hopes for him. There was a third Fairlie sib, Fiona, who vanished 20 years ago at age seven, never to be found despite an all-out police search. Fiona's mysterious disappearance soured an already shaky fraternal relationship. Did Eric play a part in whatever disaster befell her? Pilot insists that Eric killed her brutally and cold-bloodedly. But Pilot is delusional: his therapist says so, and so does everyone else, no one more emphatically than Pilot himself. Yet suddenly Pilot claims to have in his possession a gore-encrusted knife and a tennis shoe last seen on Fiona's small foot, though he won't tell where they're hidden. If such evidence in fact exists, who does it really implicate? In other words, who is raveling and who is unraveling? Skillfully shifting his points of view, Smith keeps us close to his characters, interested in their complexities, and guessing about their motives. Stylish, substantive, and savvy.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780759525993
  • Publisher: Little, Brown and Company
  • Publication date: 9/30/2001
  • Sold by: Hachette Digital, Inc.
  • Format: eBook
  • File size: 901 KB

Read an Excerpt



Excerpt

Ordinarily at this hour my brother, Eric, would have been at his desk eating his usual Bavarian ham and brie on a wheat baguette, his cup of pumpkin soup, not too hot, a brown pear, slightly ripe, more crisp than soft. Ordinarily, as I said. But today at lunch he stood in his sterile, white-tiled, gleaming-steel-and-bright-fluorescent examining room with our mother, Hannah, who had been seeing ghosts. "I've been seeing ghosts," she complained. She had said it this morning, too, when Eric had come by our house to make coffee and eggs, if I wanted them, as he had almost every day for several weeks now, to check on me, to make sure I wasn't any more suicidal than usual. Eric had told our mother to visit his office at lunchtime, that he would take a look.

This was their intimacy: her acknowledging his authority, Eric's nonchalant acceptance of our mother's acknowledgment. This was the love between them.

"All right." Eric laughed. "Mom's nuts."

She touched the crinkly paper that covered his green vinyl examining table, absently tearing it between her long, fragile, blue-veined fingers. She was not even aware of this, her actions having become disconnected from her thoughts long ago. "It's like on television," she said. "You know how on television sometimes there's an image, like, like Bugs Bunny or something, and right next to him there's a ghost of that image, like an entirely different Bugs Bunny?"

Her face was pale, more than usual. A blue-purple vein ran beneath the skin of her temple like a trickle of red wine.

"Sure," my brother said, somewhat bemused.

"That's what I've been seeing." Almost imperceptibly, the vein in her temple pulsed. It had grown more prominent in recent years, Eric noticed, her skin whiter, finer, more transparent.

She'd become ghostlike herself.

"You're seeing double," he said. "With televisions that's called a double signal." This was descriptive only, not a diagnosis.

And somewhat dismissive.

Our mother folded her arms. "Except, my young Dr. Airie, I know which image is real and which one isn't." She was proud, it seemed, her thin lips set.

"Bugs Bunny isn't real, Mom."

She giggled, rolled her eyes. "Eric."

"Are you seeing a double image right now?"

"Not now," she said firmly. "Just sometimes."

"Hmmm." Eric, a doctor, my big brother, a fucking brain surgeon, wore a white lab coat. Beneath it, a pale blue cotton shirt monogrammed with the initials ERA, the E slightly larger, for Eric Richard Airie. He also wore a deep blue tie – silk, of course – with an elegant pattern of fleur-de-lis in gold thread. Hannah, his mother, our mother, wore a soft suede jacket, chocolate brown, a beige linen skirt, Italian leather boots. Outside, it was sweater weather, early fall. Another Labor Day had come and gone. "That could be her eyes," Eric suggested, as if speaking to another doctor in the room, as if anyone else were listening. He walked to the wall, turned off the lights, and removed a small black penlight from his lab-coat pocket. "Have you been to the optometrist, to, uh, Dr. Carewater – isn't that his name?" He aimed it directly into our mother's pupils, one after the other, watching them dilate, and on his face was a well-mannered look of medical concern.

She blinked. "I thought of that." Hannah, a physical therapist, a hand specialist, would have known if it were her eyes. "My eyes are fine," she insisted. "A little myopia never caused this kind of trouble. Besides, it comes and it goes." She repeated herself now, saying, "it comes and it goes, it comes and it goes, it comes and it goes," turning the words into a song.

"Okay." Eric sucked his teeth. "It could just be that you're crossing your eyes for some reason." He walked to the wall and flicked the lights back on. His sandwich was waiting at his desk. The pumpkin soup, was it getting cold? "Can you remember when it happens? I mean, does it happen when you're coming out of a dark room and into a bright one? Does it happen when you wake up, after your eyes have been closed for a long time?" He was looking for information, clues that would lead to an explanation, data upon which to configure a theory. He was rubbing his hands together. He was growing impatient, too, hungrier by the second.

"Let me think."

They gave the examining room over to silence for a moment, and Eric looked at his clean, hairless fingers.

Hannah tore at the paper on the examining table. Then she said, "During the day. I'll be thinking, thinking about something, I suppose, and then I, and then I just realize that I'm seeing a ghost."

"You just realize it."

"It suddenly occurs to me that I've been seeing one."

"Thinking about what, specifically?"

Our mother paused again, eyes unfocused, and then she made her characteristic statement. "Just lost, dear, just lost in my thoughts." She had abandoned the crinkly paper and was now stroking the suede of her new brown jacket, combing it in the direction of the nap. When our mother wears something new, she beams, her face joyful – radiant as a young nun's. "And there's Pilot," she said softly, her expression dropping. "I've been thinking about your brother."

I am Pilot.

I am Pilot James Airie, Eric's brother, younger by five years, named after our father's passion – he flew for the airlines – a profession I have never even considered for myself.

Eric moved to the sink and pulled up his sleeves. Ever since he had gone to medical school, he washed his hands compulsively, repeatedly, even at home. Ever since medical school, he had been aware of the risks, the bacteria and bacilli, the microbes thriving just out of sight. "There's always Pilot," he agreed.

Once, there was Fiona, too. Fiona May Airie, our sister.

Our mother hummed. It was a song no one had ever heard before, one that she made up every time she hummed it. It was, I believe, her way of trying to reassure Eric. She seemed always just on the verge of paying attention, her mind ready to wander away, her gray-green eyes unfocused and hazy. Humming underscored this quality, and it made Eric crazy. It makes everyone crazy.

I know, because I do it, too.

"Are you disoriented?" Eric asked, his tone saying, Look at me, listen.

"Now?"

He sighed. "When you're seeing these ghosts."

"Disoriented?"

"I mean," he laughed softly, "more than usual?"

She sang, "Don't be cruel."

"Seriously."

"Disoriented," our mother acknowledged. "Yes."

"Tired?"

"Tired," she admitted. "Yes, yes, that, too."

"Are you sleeping?"

"Not so well."

"Are you, have you been talking to Dad?"

"Your father is lost –"

"– in the wild blue yonder." Eric narrowed his eyes. He had heard our mother say this a billion times. "I know," he said. When she spoke to our father, which was seldom, Hannah became lovesick, unfocused, a teenage girl pining for her boyfriend.

She hummed again, a slight smile on her lips.

"What about caffeine?"

"I only drink tea, dear, you know that."

"No coffee?"

This was a stupid question, her face told him. "Don't be ridiculous."

"Okay." Eric dried his hands and threw the paper towel into the mesh chrome wastebasket in the corner.

Our mother's hair, which was becoming gray, which until so very recently had been light chestnut, soft as mink, fell in uneven curls around her elegant face. It was a feminine face, a doll's face, all too easy to see hurt in. It is my face, too, a patient's face, a waiting-room face, transforming everyone who looks at it into a doctor. When I am alone, my face disappears, and I have no face at all. In someone's presence, especially Eric's or my father's, I am all face and no insides, I am a network of tiny muscles and porcelain skin stretched over a surface of cartilage, bone, and teeth. She pushed her hair away.

"Can you try to worry less?"

Our mother laughed. "About Pilot?"

"About Pilot, about Dad." He took a step toward her. "About everything."

"I don't worry about you." She placed a hand on his cheek, her fingers cool. It was always disappointing to Eric, but this is the temperature of women's hands.

"Please?"

"I can try." She sang, "I can try, I can try, I can try."

"Next time you're seeing the ghosts," he said, "give me a call, describe them." Eric took a deep breath. "But now I have a patient coming, a real one." He had food waiting – the sandwich, the soup – no doubt it had grown cold. "Not that you aren't real, Mom."

"I'm already gone." Our mother touched her jacket, stroking the nap of the suede downward, as though petting a cat. "Thank you, honey." She gave my brother a swift kiss and clutched his hands, squeezing his fingers in a motherly way that means something about holding on, about not letting go, about regret.

Only mothers can do this, I've noticed. Or old girlfriends.

Eric watched her leave the room, her voluminous beige linen skirt sweeping the sterile air behind her. I imagine that he washed his hands once more because she had touched them and that he looked up to see his own movie-star, brain-surgeon face in the mirror above the sink.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 11 Customer Reviews
  • Posted May 6, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    One of my favorite books

    A bit offbeat, not what you're expecting. It doesn't go according to formula. It's a quiet book, one to be read leisurely because it isn't an action story or one with dramatic twists and turns; just a book that will slowly pull you under.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 17, 2000

    beautiful & spooky novel!!

    I think that this book would have to one of the greatest books that i have ever read. The story is never dull, with many many twist along the way to leave you 'still' raveling in the end. Peter Moore Smith writes with a rare grace and beauty that is often hard to find. Very articulate with his writing and had many moments that left me with tears in my eyes. Touching and suspensful at the same time. I can't recommend this enough....just buy it and enjoy it!!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 30, 2000

    Raveling: A Novel of Suspense

    Peter Moore Smith has reinvented an entire genre in his first novel, 'Raveling'. Calling this an ordinary thriller or ghost story would be an insult to his talent as a writer, and to the reader as well. Anyone who enjoys a book that you can't seem to leave far from hand, or a story that seems to wrap its chilling fingers of suspense around your heart, owe yourselves this book. The Aerie family has come unraveled. The fabric of their lives together seemed to have come apart when Fiona, the youngest daughter, disappears one small day, which no one notices until a day too late. One suspects though, that this family had begun to fall apart long, long before this catalystic event takes place. Her disappearance merely serves as the beginning of a tragic story that is already well on its way. James, the father, is an airline pilot who would much rather lose himself in the heavens than involve himself with the mundane matters of his family back on Earth. Hannah, the mother, is the keeper of secrets so heinous that they cause her to go slowly blind. Ironically, she begins to 'see' her missing daughter in strange hallucinations, 20 years after her disappearance. Eric, brilliant neurosurgeon, is the glue that seems to be the only thing holding the family together. And Pilot...the younger brother and teller of this strange and beautiful tale...is diagnosed with schizophrenia after he is found in the woods behind the family home, reverted completely to an animal state. Committed to a local institution, it is here where the chilling story of the Aerie family begins to take shape. To give away any more of this fantastic story would be to give away the ultimate pleasure of reading it. The story is told in a hauntingly poetic and visionary voice...the characters drawn in strokes that are delicate with nuance and bold in action. The definitive story of a family fraught with secrets and the effects that keeping such secrets hidden causes, 'Raveling' is proudly added to my top-ten list of all-time favorite books. I can only impatiently await Smith's next foray into literature, with bated breath.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 20, 2000

    Raveling: A Novel of Suspense

    Peter Moore Smith has reinvented an entire genre in 'Raveling', his first novel. Calling this an ordinary thriller or even a ghost story would be an insult to his talent as a writer and to the reader as well. Anyone who enjoys a book that you can't quite seem to leave far from hand, or a story that wraps its cold, chilly tendrils of suspense into the very center of your being...owe yourselves this incredible book. The Airie family has unraveled. The fabric of their lives together quickly came apart when Fiona, the youngest child, disappears one small day, which no one even notices until a day too late. But...one suspects that the threads had worked their way loose long before that. Her mysterious disappearance merely served as catalyst for events that were already well on their way. James, the father, is an airline pilot who would much rather lose himself in the heavens than deal with mundane matters of family back on earth. Hannah, the mother, is the keeper of secrets so horrible, that they cause her to go blind. Eric, the golden child and brilliant neurosurgeon, seems to be the glue that is the only thing holding everything together. And Pilot...the youngest brother, and teller of this haunting and incredible tale...is diagnosed with schizophrenia after he is found in the woods behind their home, having regressed to an animal state. Committed to a local instution, it is here that the chilling tale of the Airie family begins to come to light. Revealing any more about this fantastic novel would be to give away the ultimate pleasure of reading it. The story is told in a hauntingly poetic and visionary voice...the characters drawn in strokes at once delicate with nuance, and bold in action. The definitive story of what happens to a family fraught with destructive secrets and the havoc keeping such secrets hidden causes, 'Raveling' is added to my top-ten all time favorite reads. I can only hopefully await Smith's next foray into literature...with bated breath.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 16, 2000

    Well, it unraveled me!

    Scary. Still get goose bumps. Well done and psychotic. Pilot Airie is complex and sensitive. Good insight into a broken mind on the mend. Outstanding first effort.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 18, 2000

    A chilling thriller

    The Airie family was already dysfunctional; when the youngest member seven-year-old Fiona vanished without a trace. Two decades later the matriarch begins to hear her daughter's voice. Fiona's schizophrenic older brother Pilot believes his hated brother Eric, a brilliant surgeon, killed their sibling. <P> Pilot decides to prove Eric murdered Fiona. However, no one believes the word of a medically recognized schizoid, who doubts his own conviction. Yet Pilot claims to have hard core evidence. However, did he attain the proof from Eric? Perhaps he always possessed the murder weapon since even he wonders at time if he, not Eric, is Fiona's killer. <P> UNRAVELING is a fantastic psycholigcal thriller that never eases up on the tension throttle as a cat and mouse game unravels, but readers do not know who plays which role. The audience realizes that one of the brothers probably killed their sister, but which one remains the puzzler. The audience constantly switches sides as to whom that murderer is due to Peter Moore Smith deliberately and cleverly changing the perspective. This tale is more than just a taut chiller. It will land on everyone's top five list for the year. <P>Harriet Klausner

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 25, 2000

    A Terrific Novel

    I literally read this over one weekend. The who-done-it suspense was gripping and the characterizations life-like.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 29, 2000

    A Good First Effort

    I won't give a synopsis of the plot like other reviewers have done - suffice it to say that this book is well written with a unique style and keeps the reader guessing right up until the end. (Did anyone else notice the glaring error in the Kirkus review? It gives the family name as Fairlie, rather than Airie!!)

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 3, 2000

    Shock-ending jolts this reader

    Both fascinating and frightening, Peter Moore Smith has as much talent as a writer, that his sister, Julianne 'soon to be in Hannibal' Moore has as an actress...they come from very good genes, apparently. Moore is a very good story teller, managing to find the most original way to tell this complex tale of the weird, but not eccentric, Airie family. Instead their odd ways of falling apart or staying calm on the surface comes to light as you get deeper into this tale of a family suffering the loss of their youngest child and how 29-year old Pilot Airie, who is telling the story in the first person but has the knowledge and hindsight of all the major players, including his older brother Eric, a control freak brain surgeon whom begins a relationship with Pilot's psychiatrist, who is hired to make sure if Pilot really is schizophrenic or if something more deep-seated is going on in his life to make him feel responsible for his younger sister's disappearance. I won't reveal anymore because from here on out your in Moore's hands and he manages to shock in the most jolting ending of this year so far. This book is disturbing, but also with characters that are so hard to forget, you'll be hooked from beginning to end. Moore's style, itself, is original and it sets you up for an unsettling, unforgettable ending. Definately worth reading!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 24, 2000

    WOW...A CHILLING SUSPENSER

    Meet the Airie family...Pilot Airie is a schizophrenic, his mother Hannah, a hand specialist, and brother Eric, a neurosurgeon. The Airie's have a twisted secret in their past...what happened to seven year old Hannah Airie? After one of the Airie's parties, Pilot's sister, Hannah, disappeared. The only clue is her shoe, found in the woods behind their house. After an 'episode', Pilot begins seeing psychologist Katherine Jane DeQuincey-Joy. During their sessions Pilot will tell the disturbing story of the disappearance. He will tell of his mother seeing ghosts, and he will tell of a dark side that brother Eric hides so well. Pilot must find his sister's killer, and put an end to the madness that eats at him day after day. WOW...'Raveling' is an excellent book, it is hard to believe this is the author's first novel. You are not likely to read a better psychological thriller this year. Peter Moore Smith has written an original thriller, with a creepy plot,and chilling characters. Smith plays mind games with the reader, leading them to believe something at one point, and then changing their mind the next. A MUST read!!! Nick Gonnella

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 10, 2000

    fantastic psycholigcal thriller

    The Airie family was already dysfunctional; when the youngest member seven-year-old Fiona vanished without a trace. Two decades later the matriarch begins to hear her daughter¿s voice. Fiona¿s schizophrenic older brother Pilot believes his hated brother Eric, a brilliant surgeon, killed their sibling. <P>Pilot decides to prove Eric murdered Fiona. However, no one believes the word of a medically recognized schizoid, who doubts his own conviction. Yet Pilot claims to have hard core evidence. However, did he attain the proof from Eric? Perhaps he always possessed the murder weapon since even he wonders at time if he, not Eric, is Fiona¿s killer. <P>UNRAVELING is a fantastic psycholigcal thriller that never eases up on the tension throttle as a cat and mouse game unravels, but readers do not know who plays which role. The audience realizes that one of the brothers probably killed their sister, but which one remains the puzzler. The audience constantly switches sides as to whom that murderer is due to Peter Moore Smith deliberately and cleverly changing the perspective. This tale is more than just a taut chiller. It will land on everyone¿s top five list for the year. <P>Harriet Klausner

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing all of 11 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)