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Raw Power [Legacy Edition] [Explicit Lyrics]

( 4 )

Editorial Reviews

All Music Guide - Mark Deming
Historical revisionism has been part of rock & roll ever since folks started writing about it with a modicum of serious intent, and part of the fun is it hardly remains static with the passage of time. After Iggy & the Stooges' manic swan song Raw Power was released in 1973, Iggy Pop was known to complain that David Bowie's mix neutered the ferocity of the original recordings. In time it became conventional wisdom that Bowie's mix spoiled a potential masterpiece, so much so that in 1997, when Columbia made plans to issue a new edition of Raw Power, they brought in Pop to remix the original tapes and (at least in theory) give us the "real" version we'd been denied ...
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Editorial Reviews

All Music Guide - Mark Deming
Historical revisionism has been part of rock & roll ever since folks started writing about it with a modicum of serious intent, and part of the fun is it hardly remains static with the passage of time. After Iggy & the Stooges' manic swan song Raw Power was released in 1973, Iggy Pop was known to complain that David Bowie's mix neutered the ferocity of the original recordings. In time it became conventional wisdom that Bowie's mix spoiled a potential masterpiece, so much so that in 1997, when Columbia made plans to issue a new edition of Raw Power, they brought in Pop to remix the original tapes and (at least in theory) give us the "real" version we'd been denied all these years. Then the world heard Pop's painfully harsh and distorted version of Raw Power, and suddenly Bowie's tamer but more dynamic mix didn't sound so bad, after all. Now the whole saga comes full-circle as Columbia releases a two-disc "Legacy Edition" of Raw Power that features Bowie's original mix in remastered form, along with a bonus disc of studio outtakes and an October 1973 Stooges show recorded in Atlanta for possible radio broadcast (then as now, radio wasn't ready for Pop's between-song banter or tunes like "Cock in My Pocket"). The remastered version of the Bowie mix boosts the bass that was all but absent in the original LP version just a bit, and the fidelity is inarguably superior to the long-gone CD version of Raw Power's original mix, but ultimately it seems that the definitive version of Raw Power lies between these two extremes. Bowie's mix allows a greater appreciation of what the band is doing and better favors Pop's vocals, but sometimes it sounds too polite, while the Pop mix boasts a tougher guitar sound and more bass but pushes everything so far into the red that listening to the thing is tiring (though curiously, the album's quietest song, "Gimme Danger," is the one that gains the most in Pop's mix). Ultimately, Bowie's original mix works better, but the remastered version doesn't do much to correct its flaws. As for the live material, this is the strongest and best-sounding recording that's emerged to date of the James Williamson-era Stooges on-stage, but since most of the live tapes that have appeared fall somewhere between fair and miserable, that only says so much. When the Stooges hit fourth gear in the second half of this gig, they sound very impressive, but there are some serious technical glitches early on -- the mix tends to favor Scott Thurston's piano over Williamson's guitar, and it takes a few songs for the players to really lock in and focus, so if you're hoping to finally hear a decent-sounding and truly flame-throwing Stooges show on CD, you're going to have to wait. And even though Raw Power outtakes like "I Got a Right," "Gimme Some Skin," and "I'm Sick of You" have been circulating for years, for some reason they don't appear on this set; instead, we get the little-heard African pastiche "Doojiman" and a rehearsal tape of "Head On," and while both are fine stuff, there's a lot more to the Raw Power story than this. The Legacy Edition of Raw Power honors this great album better than the Iggy Pop remix that's been its only digital representation since 1997, but the extras included here fall short of making this the definitive release of the James Williamson-era Stooges' bloodied but unbowed triumph.
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Product Details

  • Release Date: 4/13/2010
  • Label: Sony Legacy
  • UPC: 886975614929
  • Catalog Number: 756149
  • Sales rank: 14,722

Tracks

Disc 1
  1. 1 Search and Destroy (3:28)
  2. 2 Gimme Danger (3:31)
  3. 3 You Pretty Face is Going To Hell (4:54)
  4. 4 Penetration (3:40)
  5. 5 Raw Power (4:25)
  6. 6 I Need Somebody (4:56)
  7. 7 Shake Appeal (3:02)
  8. 8 Death Trip (5:54)
Disc 2
  1. 1 Introduction (0:22)
  2. 2 Raw Power (5:46)
  3. 3 Head On (9:14)
  4. 4 Gimme Danger (7:57)
  5. 5 Search and Destroy (7:25)
  6. 6 I Need Somebody (6:15)
  7. 7 Heavy Liquid (7:40)
  8. 8 Cock In My Pocket (3:53)
  9. 9 Open Up and Bleed (10:22)
  10. 10 Doojiman (4:03)
  11. 11 Head On (5:39)
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Album Credits

Performance Credits
Iggy & the Stooges Primary Artist, Indexed Contributor
Iggy Pop Vocals
Ron Asheton Bass
Scott Asheton Drums
Scott Thurston Piano
James Williamson Guitar
Technical Credits
Bruce Dickinson Producer, Tape Research
Iggy Pop Composer, Producer, Liner Notes
Greg Allen Art Direction
Scott Asheton Liner Notes
Joe Neil Engineer
Mark Wilder Mastering
James Williamson Composer, Liner Notes
Iggy & the Stooges Producer
Kris Needs Liner Notes
Robert Matheu Producer, Tape Research
Jeremy Holiday Package Manager
Brian J. Bowe Liner Notes
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 5
( 4 )
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Sort by: Showing all of 4 Customer Reviews
  • Posted October 1, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    The Only Stooges Raw Power YOU Need

    Dear Listener:
    Did you, like me, buy the original vinyl (LP) version of Raw Power in 1973, the original CD version, the alternate CD version, and then thought you were set for the rest of your life? Well, we were not. Let us just say that this is an essential (an overused, but hopefully still meaningful word) CD purchase if your household does not have any version of Raw Power (no "shame, shame" from me) and a worthwhile addition even if you do. The addition of the bonus live tracks (which I had not heard before) is in itself worth the purchase. If you are a young or older newbie to Iggy, buy this package for an almost complete Stooges education. Then, go to the Fun House.

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  • Posted October 1, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    The Beginnings Of Punk? Definitely!

    To say that the title of Iggy and The Stooges' 1973 album "Raw Power" is appropriate would be like saying that John Elway throws a football for a living. In other words, it doesn't tell the whole story. But "Raw Power" is appropriate. It's also deliberate, energetic, forceful, absolute and serious as a heart attack. The Igster and his band had already made two brilliant records with Elektra Records and by the time they signed with Columbia under the auspicies of one David Bowie, they were expected to be The Next Big Thing. That never happened. In fact, when "Raw Power" was first released, it just barely made The Billboard Top 200. Yet, this record, like their first two, has gained a popularity that just seems to increase with the passage of time. It has become one of those seminal records where you can pinpoint the beginning of a movement---namely punk, new wave or alternative/grunge---and you can't imagine that movement without that recording.

    The album, which was produced by Iggy and mixed by David Bowie, has a brittle sound where the treble and the volume seems turned up to eleven. However, the band, who by this time had a new guitarist named James Williamson, had a cataclyismic intensity that came through loud and clear. This album was zero boogie and full-tilt white noise from the beginning ("Search and Destroy") to the end ("Death Trip"). Still, it goes without saying that even their acoustic sounding songs ("Gimme Danger" and "I Need Somebody") had an unshakable edge. On top of all this, there is a second disc featuring a live performance of the band, doing most of the songs off "Raw Power" as well as a few understandably unreleased cuts.

    Just the fact that this band managed to get into The Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame on three albums alone is amazing to most people. For those who don't understand why, "Raw Power" is a great place to start discovering why.

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    Posted August 9, 2011

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 26, 2012

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Sort by: Showing all of 4 Customer Reviews