Raymie, Dickie and the Bean: Why I Love and Hate My Brothers
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Raymie, Dickie and the Bean: Why I Love and Hate My Brothers

by Ray Romano, Gary Locke, Richard Romano, Robert Romano
     
 

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Raymie, Dickie, and the Bean are the Romano brothers. They get along most of the time. Except for when they don't. Today Mom and Dad said they're going to the amusement park. Raymie and Dickie can't wait to ride the Vomitizer because it's the scariest ride in the whole park -- but first Mom makes them ride on Chuckie the Choo-Choo with the Bean. Having a younger

Overview

Raymie, Dickie, and the Bean are the Romano brothers. They get along most of the time. Except for when they don't. Today Mom and Dad said they're going to the amusement park. Raymie and Dickie can't wait to ride the Vomitizer because it's the scariest ride in the whole park -- but first Mom makes them ride on Chuckie the Choo-Choo with the Bean. Having a younger brother really messes up the fun, but eventually Raymie and Dickie get to go on the Vomitizer (okay, maybe there's a reason they call it the scariest ride in the park!). At the end of the day they even get soaked on the water ride.

Raymie knows that when you have brothers, things never go exactly how you expect them to, even when you give them noogie after noogie to drive the point home. Ray Romano, one of America's recognizable TV personalities, tells a tale of sibling antics from his own childhood. Filled with knowing details of family life, this is a story brothers and sisters everywhere will see themselves in.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature
This picture book has a ready-made audience in the fans of the "Everybody Loves Raymond" television show. Ray Romano's high profile name and celebrity will garner book sales before fans even open the front cover. While this book will get attention for its celebrity, it will not get attention for the qualities that are important in a children's picture book. First and foremost, the child's viewpoint is not at the center of this story. Although told by Raymie, this is more a reminiscence from an adult's point of view rather than a child's. The writing is lackluster and the story itself is flat and without any real plot. The story is nothing more than a series of events in a day at an amusement park with no high or low points to lend any substance to the plot. A CD with Romano reading the book is included and held the promise of funny read aloud. Quite the contrary, his reading was as dull as the book itself. The caricature-like illustrations match the book's hollow tone. 2005, Simon & Schuster, Ages 4 to 7.
—Joan Kindig, Ph.D.
School Library Journal - School Library Journal
K-Gr 4-Romano recounts a mildly amusing story of a childhood visit to an amusement park. The middle child of three brothers in a loving family, 10-year-old Raymie is looking forward to his favorite ride, the Vomitizer, but first must endure Chuckie the Choo-Choo with his younger brother, Bean. Typical sibling interactions, usually insults and rivalry but occasionally a sympathetic moment, provide the substance of the tale. Instances of bawdy humor (wedgies, farting, etc.) appear throughout. Done in oil paints, the caricaturelike illustrations are dynamic and expressive. Although the subject is inherently appealing to children, the tone of the narrative, with its adult perspective and tongue-in-cheek humor, seems targeted more to adult fans of Romano's television show. Accompanied by an audio CD, read by the author.-Robin L. Gibson, formerly at Perry County District Library, New Lexington, OH Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
In this flashy, fragmentary memoir, Romano casts himself as a ten-year-old, roughhousing with brothers Dickie (12) and Bean (four) while taking a trip to an amusement park. Wide-eyed, open-mouthed faces thrust up against the picture planes, the brothers in Locke's technically adept but overwrought art grimace frantically, but can't rescue the routine assortment of noogies, wedgies, grossouts ("Good thing about eating with Bean: He can never finish his food. Bad thing about eating with Bean: Food makes him stinky") and minor misadventures that the author seems to think will engage young readers-or, more likely, their parents. Romano's dispirited reading on the enclosed CD perfectly captures the mediocrity of this lackadaisical crossover attempt. (Picture book. 6-8)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780689864513
Publisher:
Simon & Schuster Books For Young Readers
Publication date:
03/29/2005
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
10.20(w) x 10.50(h) x 0.40(d)
Age Range:
4 - 7 Years

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