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Re-Visioning Family Therapy, Second Edition: Race, Culture, and Gender in Clinical Practice / Edition 2

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Overview

Now in a significantly revised and expanded second edition, this groundbreaking work illuminates how racism, sexism, and other forms of oppression constrain the lives of diverse clients--and family therapy itself. Practitioners and students gain vital tools for reevaluating prevailing conceptions of family health and pathology; tapping into clients' cultural resources; and developing more inclusive theories and therapeutic practices. From leaders in the field, the second edition features many new chapters, case examples, and specific recommendations for culturally competent assessment, treatment, and clinical training. The section in which authors reflect on their own cultural and family legacies also has been significantly expanded.

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

"Reading this book was a truly invigorating experience. It captures the complex contexts of clients' and practitioners' lives, and puts forth suggestions for practice that are inclusive of all whom we serve. Resisting pathologizing explanations, the book provides a depth of knowledge for helping families draw on their strengths during difficult times. Chapters show how exclusion and marginalization contribute to the problems that families experience, and highlight clinical intervention approaches that are transformative. The second edition squarely confronts new forms of oppression arising in changing global contexts. This book will be most useful for graduate-level training in social work and other helping professions."--Sarah Maiter, MSW, PhD, School of Social Work, York University, Toronto, Canada

"This really is a terrific volume! The title aptly describes how McGoldrick, Hardy, and their contributing authors are 're-visioning' family therapy to reflect complex contemporary issues and approaches. This state-of-the-art work is a 'must have' for anyone who practices or teaches family therapy."--Beverly Greene, PhD, ABPP, Department of Psychology, St. John's University

"McGoldrick and Hardy lead a wise council of practitioners to construct a vision of family therapy that is culturally and socially grounded. Rather than portraying individual cultural groups, the text addresses nuanced processes in understanding and working with difference in ways that broaden traditional conceptualizations and practices. This text will make a wonderful contribution to graduate courses addressing family treatment in all mental health-related disciplines."--Steven R. Lopez, PhD, Department of Psychology, University of Southern California

"McGoldrick and her colleagues have again pushed the boundaries of family therapy with this splendid, updated second edition. Here is a vision of family therapy that embraces the lived complexity of diversity, addressing the intersections of race, ethnicity, class, gender, national origin, religion and spirituality, and sexual orientation. The expanded section on therapists' own cultural legacies and stories will stimulate self-reflection that is critical to developing cultural competence, while increased attention to training will aid students and teachers alike in grounding this vision in practice. I highly recommend this text."--Francis G. Lu, MD, Department of Psychiatry, University of California, San Francisco

Doody's Review Service
Reviewer: Gary B Kaniuk, Psy.D.(Cermak Health Services)
Description: This book discusses family therapy within a broad cultural context, including race, gender, social class, sexual orientation, and spirituality. The authors show how oppression impacts the family and what therapists can do in clinical practice. This updates the 1998 first edition.
Purpose: According to the editors, the goal of the book "is to transform the focus of our work beyond the interior of the family, so that we can begin to see how our clients' lives are constrained by larger societal structures and develop new ways of working based on a more contextual understanding of ourselves, our society, our history, and our clients' lives."
Audience: The audience includes practitioners and students in graduate-level courses. Dr. McGoldrick is director of the Multicultural Family Institute in Highland Park, New Jersey, and associate professor of clinical psychiatry at Robert Wood Medical School, and Dr. Hardy is professor of family therapy at Drexel University. The contributors are affiliated with academic institutions or family institutes.
Features: This book begins with theory underlying family therapy, including specific cultural factors. Next, the authors describe their individual experiences regarding culture and race. The book continues with how racial and cultural issues impact on therapy and clinical practice in general. Finally, the authors discuss how students should be trained. Case examples make the book come alive. In the introduction, the editors discuss how family therapy has evolved through the years. There is also an interesting discussion about the DSM (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders) and labels in general. However, my favorite part of the book is the description of the therapists' personal experiences. These narratives are fascinating reading and include many different cultural identities. The implications for training future family therapists are very important. There is no easy way to teach European-American students about racism and white privilege. The editors provide guidelines for training programs (chapter 37). In the last chapter, Dr. Hardy encourages trainees of color to become GEMM therapists (good, effective, mainstream, minority family therapists).
Assessment: This excellent book does a nice job of showing how race, culture, and gender impact family therapy. It will open the eyes of students and give seasoned veterans food for thought, helping them consider their work given certain societal structures. Ultimately, we can conclude there are no easy answers, but the issues are presented very well here. This should be required reading for graduate students specializing in family work. This edition, a necessary update of a 10-year-old publication, adds 20 new chapters and revises and expands others.
From The Critics
Reviewer: Gary B Kaniuk, Psy.D.(Cermak Health Services)
Description: This book discusses family therapy within a broad cultural context, including race, gender, social class, sexual orientation, and spirituality. The authors show how oppression impacts the family and what therapists can do in clinical practice. This updates the 1998 first edition.
Purpose: According to the editors, the goal of the book "is to transform the focus of our work beyond the interior of the family, so that we can begin to see how our clients' lives are constrained by larger societal structures and develop new ways of working based on a more contextual understanding of ourselves, our society, our history, and our clients' lives."
Audience: The audience includes practitioners and students in graduate-level courses. Dr. McGoldrick is director of the Multicultural Family Institute in Highland Park, New Jersey, and associate professor of clinical psychiatry at Robert Wood Medical School, and Dr. Hardy is professor of family therapy at Drexel University. The contributors are affiliated with academic institutions or family institutes.
Features: This book begins with theory underlying family therapy, including specific cultural factors. Next, the authors describe their individual experiences regarding culture and race. The book continues with how racial and cultural issues impact on therapy and clinical practice in general. Finally, the authors discuss how students should be trained. Case examples make the book come alive. In the introduction, the editors discuss how family therapy has evolved through the years. There is also an interesting discussion about the DSM (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders) and labels in general. However, my favorite part of the book is the description of the therapists' personal experiences. These narratives are fascinating reading and include many different cultural identities. The implications for training future family therapists are very important. There is no easy way to teach European-American students about racism and white privilege. The editors provide guidelines for training programs (chapter 37). In the last chapter, Dr. Hardy encourages trainees of color to become GEMM therapists (good, effective, mainstream, minority family therapists).
Assessment: This excellent book does a nice job of showing how race, culture, and gender impact family therapy. It will open the eyes of students and give seasoned veterans food for thought, helping them consider their work given certain societal structures. Ultimately, we can conclude there are no easy answers, but the issues are presented very well here. This should be required reading for graduate students specializing in family work. This edition, a necessary update of a 10-year-old publication, adds 20 new chapters and revises and expands others.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781593854270
  • Publisher: Guilford Publications, Inc.
  • Publication date: 8/15/2008
  • Edition description: Second Edition
  • Edition number: 2
  • Pages: 483
  • Sales rank: 240,602
  • Product dimensions: 6.40 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 1.50 (d)

Meet the Author

Monica McGoldrick, LCSW, PhD (h.c.), is Director of the Multicultural Family Institute in Highland Park, New Jersey, and Associate Professor of Clinical Psychiatry, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School. Her videotape of clinical work with a multicultural family around issues of loss is one of the most widely respected in the field. Several of her books have become bestselling classics, including Ethnicity and Family Therapy; The Expanded Family Life Cycle; Genograms: Assessment and Intervention; Women in Families; Living Beyond Loss: Death in the Family; and Re-Visioning Family Therapy. She is also the author of a book for the general public, You Can Go Home Again: Reconnecting with Your Family. Ms. McGoldrick has received the American Family Therapy Academy's award for Distinguished Contribution to Family Therapy Theory and Practice. An internationally known author, she speaks widely on culture, class, gender, the family life cycle, and other topics.

Kenneth V. Hardy, PhD, is Professor of Family Therapy at Drexel University in Philadelphia and Director of the Eikenberg Institute for Relationships in New York City. He is a former Professor of Family Therapy at Syracuse University, where he also served as the Director of Clinical Training and Research and Chairperson of the Department of Child and Family Studies. Dr. Hardy is also the former Director of the Center for Children, Families, and Trauma at the internationally renowned Ackerman Institute for the Family in New York City. He maintains a private practice in New York City, specializing in family therapy. His work has received considerable public acclaim in both the electronic and print media, with appearances on The Oprah Winfrey Show, Dateline NBC, ABC’s 20/20, and PBS.

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Table of Contents

I. Theoretical Perspectives

1. Introduction: Re-Visioning Family Therapy from a Multicultural Perspective, Monica McGoldrick and Kenneth V. Hardy

2. Transnational Journeys, Celia Jaes Falicov

3. Migration and the Disruption of the Social Network, Carlos E. Sluzki

4. Social Class: Implications for Family Therapy, Tracey A. Laszloffy

5. Spirituality, Healing, and Resilience, Froma Walsh

6. Race, Reality, and Relationships: Implications for the Re-visioning of Family Therapy, Kenneth V. Hardy

7. Understanding Families in the Context of Cultural Adaptations to Oppression, Vanessa McAdams-Mahmoud

II. Cultural Legacies and Stories: Therapists' Experiences

8. Finding a Place Called “Home,” Monica McGoldrick

9. Black Genealogy Revisited: Restorying an African American Family, Elaine Pinderhughes

10. The Discovery of My Multicultural Identity, Fernando Lopez-Colón

11. Our Iranian–African American Interracial Family, Jayne Mahboubi and Nasim Mahboubi

12. Voluntary Childlessness and Motherhood: Afterthoughts, Marlene F. Watson

13. Grieving in Network and Community: Bearing Witness to the Loss of Our Son, Jodie Kliman and David Trimble

14. Going Home: One Orphan’s Journey from Chicago to Poland and Back, John Folwarski

15. Legacies of White Privilege, Lisa Berndt

16. Transforming a Racist Legacy, John J. Lawless

17. The Semitism Schism: Jewish–Palestinian Legacies in a Family Therapy Training Context, Linda Stone Fish

18. My Evolving Identity from Arab to Palestinian to Muslim, Nuha Abudabbeh

19. Biracial Legitimacy: Embracing Marginality, MaryAnna Domokos-Cheng Ham

III. Racial Identity and Racism: Implications for Therapy

20. The Dynamics of a Pro-Racist Ideology: Implications for Family Therapists, Kenneth V. Hardy and Tracey A. Laszloffy

21. White Privilege and Male Privilege: A Personal Account of Coming to See Correspondences through Work in Women’s Studies, Peggy McIntosh

22. Dismantling White Male Privilege within Family Therapy, Ken Dolan-Del Vecchio

23. Latinas in the United States: Bridging Two Worlds, Nydia Garcia Preto

24. Therapy with Mixed-Race Families, Tracey A. Laszloffy

IV. Implications for Clinical Practice

25. Working with LGBT Families, Elijah C. Nealy

26. Gay and Lesbian Couples: Successful Coping with Minority Stress, Robert-Jay Green

27. Working with Immigrant and Refugee Families, Marsha Pravder Mirkin and Hugo Kamya

28. A Fifth-Province Approach to Intracultural Issues in an Irish Context: Marginal Illuminations, Imelda Colgan McCarthy and Nollaig O’Reilly Byrne

29. Working with African Americans and Trauma: Lessons for Clinicians from Hurricane Katrina, Nancy Boyd-Franklin

30. Once They Come: Testimony Therapy and Healing Questions for African American Couples, Makungu M. Akinyela

31. Climbing Up the Rough Side of the Mountain: Hope, Culture, and Therapy, Paulette Moore Hines

32. Interracial Asian Couples: Beyond Black and White, Tazuko Shibusawa

33. Working with Families Who Are Homeless, Peter Fraenkel and Chloe Carmichael

34. Coyote Returns: A Reconciliation between History and Hope, Robin LaDue

V. Implications for Training

35. Teaching White Students about Racism and Its Implications in Practice, Norma Akamatsu

36. Visionary Social Justice: Narratives of Diversity, Social Location, and Personal Compassion, Matthew R. Mock

37. Re-Visioning Training, Kenneth V. Hardy and Monica McGoldrick

38. Becoming a GEMM Therapist: Work Harder, Be Smarter, and Never Discuss Race, Kenneth V. Hardy

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