Read, Reason, Write / Edition 10

Read, Reason, Write / Edition 10

by Dorothy Seyler
     
 

ISBN-10: 0073405930

ISBN-13: 9780073405933

Pub. Date: 07/28/2011

Publisher: McGraw-Hill Higher Education

Our times demand that we understand what we read,that we think critically about others' ideas,argue effectively in support of our own,and be able to systematically go through the wealth of available information and ideas,rejecting what is unreliable and synthesizing the useful with what we already know and understand. Read,Reason,Write combines instruction in…  See more details below

Overview

Our times demand that we understand what we read,that we think critically about others' ideas,argue effectively in support of our own,and be able to systematically go through the wealth of available information and ideas,rejecting what is unreliable and synthesizing the useful with what we already know and understand. Read,Reason,Write combines instruction in critical thinking and analysis,argument,and research techniques with a collection of readings appropriate for practicing these necessary skills. In addition to its ample instruction and opportunities for practice,it also shows students the interrelatedness of reading,analytic,argumentative,and research skills.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780073405933
Publisher:
McGraw-Hill Higher Education
Publication date:
07/28/2011
Pages:
640
Sales rank:
745,766
Product dimensions:
7.30(w) x 9.10(h) x 0.90(d)

Table of Contents

CONTENTS

Preface

SECTION 1CRITICAL READING AND ANALYSIS

Chapter 1WRITERS AND THEIR SOURCES

  • Reading, Writing, and the Contexts of Argument
  • Responding to Sources
  • Abraham Lincoln, “The Gettysburg Address”
  • The Response to Content
  • The Analytic Response
  • The Evaluation Response
  • The Research Response
  • Deborah Tannen, “Who Does the Talking Here?”
  • Writing Summaries
  • Guidelines for Writing Summaries
  • Active Reading: Use Your Mind!
  • Guidelines for Active Reading
  • Susan Cain, “The Rise of the New Groupthink”
  • Using Paraphrase
  • Acknowledging Sources Informally
  • Referring to People and Sources
  • Joel Achenbach, “The Future Is Now: It’s Heading Right at Us, But We Never See It Coming”
  • Presenting Direct Quotations: A Guide for Form and Style
  • Reasons for Using Quotation Marks
  • A Brief Guide to Quoting
  • For Reading and Analysis
  • Alex Knapp, “Five Leadership Lessons from James. T. Kirk”
  • Suggestions for Discussion and Writing

Chapter 2 RESPONDING CRITICALLY TO SOURCES

  • Traits of the Critical Reader/Thinker
  • Examining the Rhetorical Context of a Source
  • Who Is the Author?
  • What Type—or Genre—of Source Is It?
  • What Kind of Audience Does the Author Anticipate?
  • What Is the Author’s Primary Purpose?
  • What Are the Author’s Sources of Information?
  • Analyzing the Style of a Source
  • Denotative and Connotative Word Choice
  • Tone
  • Level of Diction
  • Sentence Structure
  • Metaphors
  • Organization and Examples
  • Repetition
  • Hyperbole, Understatement, and Irony
  • Quotation Marks, Italics, and Capital Letters
  • Dave Barry, “In a Battle of Wits with Kitchen Appliances, I'm Toast”
  • Writing about Style
  • Understanding Your Purpose and Audience
  • Planning the Essay
  • Drafting the Style Analysis
  • A Checklist for Revision
  • Ellen Goodman, “In Praise of a Snail’s Pace”
  • Student Essay: James Goode, “A Convincing Style”
  • Analyzing Two or More Sources
  • Guidelines for Preparing a Contrast Essay
  • Arthur Bright, “Algerian Hostage Crisis Heightens as Scores Are Reported Dead”
  • Jamie Dettmer, “Hostages Reportedly Dead in Algerian Oil Field Siege”
  • For Reading and Analysis
  • Firoozeh Dumas, "The F Word"
  • Alexandra Petri, “Love to Read, Kids? Your Time Is Almost Up”
  • Suggestions for Discussion and Writing

SECTION 2THE WORLD OF ARGUMENT

Chapter 3UNDERSTANDING THE BASICS OF ARGUMENT

STATISTICS IN ARGUMENT

  • Characteristics of Argument
  • Argument Is Conversation with a Goal
  • Argument Takes a Stand on an Arguable Issue
  • Argument Uses Reasons and Evidence
  • Argument Incorporates Values
  • Argument Recognizes a Topic’s Complexity
  • The Shape of Argument: What We Can Learn from Aristotle
  • Ethos (About the Writer/Speaker)
  • Logos (About the Logic of the Argument)
  • Pathos (About Appeals to the Audience)
  • Karios (About the Occasion or Situation)
  • The Language of Argument
  • Facts
  • Inferences
  • Judgments
  • Sam Wang and Sandra Aamodt, “Your Brain Lies to You”
  • The Shape of Argument: What We Can Learn from Toulmin
  • Claims
  • Grounds (or Data or Evidence)
  • Warrants
  • Backing
  • Qualifiers
  • Rebuttals
  • Using Toulmin’s Terms to Analyze Arguments
  • Jeffrey Mateer and Erin Leu, “Cheering Free Speech”
  • William Saletan, “How Can We Ban Insults against Jews but Not Muslims?”
  • Suggestions for Discussion and Writing

Chapter 4WRITING EFFECTIVE ARGUMENTS

  • Know Your Audience
  • Who Is My Audience?
  • What Will My Audience Know about My Topic?
  • Where Does My Audience Stand on the Issue?
  • How Should I Speak to My Audience?
  • Understand Your Writing Purpose
  • What Type (Genre) of Argument Am I Preparing?
  • What Is My Goal?
  • Will the Rogerian or Conciliatory Approach Work for Me?
  • Move from Topic to Claim to Possible Support
  • Selecting a Topic
  • Drafting a Claim
  • Listing Possible Grounds
  • Listing Grounds for the Other Side or Another Perspective
  • Planning the Approach
  • Draft Your Argument
  • Guidelines for Drafting
  • Revise Your Draft
  • Rewriting
  • Editing
  • A Few Words about Words and Tone
  • Proofreading
  • A Checklist for Revision
  • For Analysis and Debate
  • Darius Rejali, “Five Myths about Torture and Truth”
  • M. Gregg Bloche, “Torture Is Wrong—But It Might Work”
  • Suggestions for Discussion and Writing

Chapter 5READING, ANALYZING, AND USING VISUALS AND

  • Responding to Visual Arguments
  • Guidelines for Reading Photographs
  • Guidelines for Reading Political Cartoons
  • Guidelines for Reading Advertisements
  • Reading Graphics
  • Understanding How Graphics Differ
  • Guidelines for Reading Graphics
  • The Use of Authority and Statistics
  • Judging Authorities
  • Understanding and Evaluating Sources
  • Guidelines for Evaluating Statistics
  • Guidelines for Evaluating Statistics
  • Writing the Investigative Argument
  • Gathering and Analyzing Evidence
  • Planning and Drafting the Essay
  • Guidelines for Writing an Investigative Argument
  • Analyzing Evidence: The Key to an Effective Argument
  • Preparing Graphics for Your Essay
  • A Checklist for Revision
  • Student Essay: Garrett Berger, “Buying Time”
  • For Reading and Analysis
  • Joe Navarro, “Every Body’s Talking”
  • Suggestions for Discussion and Writing

Chapter 6LEARNING MORE ABOUT ARGUMENT: INDUCTION,

DEDUCTION, ANALOGY, AND LOGICAL

FALLACIES

  • Induction
  • Deduction
  • “The Declaration of Independence”
  • Analogy
  • Logical Fallacies
  • Causes of Illogic
  • Fallacies That Result from Oversimplifying
  • Fallacies That Result from Avoiding the Real Issue
  • Christian Brahmstedt, “Help Those Who Help, Not Hurt, Themselves”
  • For Reading and Analysis
  • Elizabeth Cady Stanton, “Declaration of Sentiments”
  • Neil de Grasse Tyson, "Things People Say"

SECTION 3STUDYING SOME ARGUMENTS BY GENRE

Chapter 7DEFINITION ARGUMENTS

  • Defining as Part of an Argument
  • When Defining Is the Argument
  • Strategies for Developing an Extended Definition
  • Guidelines for Evaluating Definition Arguments
  • Preparing a Definition Argument
  • A Checklist for Revision
  • Student Essay: Laura Mullins, “Paragon or Parasite?”
  • For Analysis and Debate
  • Robin Givhan, “Glamour, That Certain Something”
  • Suggestions for Discussion and Writing

Chapter 8EVALUATION ARGUMENTS

  • Characteristics of Evaluation Arguments
  • Types of Evaluation Arguments
  • Guidelines for Analyzing an Evaluation Argument
  • Preparing an Evaluation Argument
  • A Checklist for Revision
  • Student Review: Ian Habel, “Winchester’s Alchemy: Two
  • Men and a Book”
  • Evaluating an Argument: The Rebuttal or Refutation Essay
  • Guidelines for Preparing a Refutation or Rebuttal Argument
  • Steven Pinker, “Mind Over Mass Media”
  • For Analysis and Debate
  • Thomas Sowell, “Christmas-Tree Totalitarians”
  • Suggestions for Discussion and Writing

Chapter 9THE POSITION PAPER: CLAIMS OF VALUE

  • Characteristics of the Position Paper
  • Guidelines for Analyzing a Claim of Value
  • Preparing a Position Paper
  • A Checklist for Revision
  • Student Essay: Chris Brown, “Examining the Issue of Gun Control”
  • David Pogue, “To Track My Thief”
  • Gregory M. Kennedy SJ, “Trash Talk: Reflections on Our Throwaway Society”
  • Suggestions for Discussion and Writing

Chapter 10ARGUMENTS ABOUT CAUSE

  • Characteristics of Causal Arguments
  • An Example of Causal Complexity: Lincoln’s Election and the Start of the Civil War
  • Mill’s Methods for Investigating Causes
  • Guidelines for Analyzing Causal Arguments
  • Preparing a Causal Argument
  • A Checklist for Revision
  • For Analysis and Debate
  • Emily Matchar, “Why Your Office Needs More Bratty Millennials”
  • Caroline Simard, “ ‘Daring to Discuss Women in Science’: A Response to John Tierney”

Chapter 11PRESENTING PROPOSALS: THE PROBLEM/SOLUTION

  • Characteristics of Problem/Solution Arguments
  • Guidelines for Analyzing Problem/Solution Arguments
  • Priya Natarajan, “Want More Scientists? Turn Grade Schools into Laboratories”
  • Preparing a Problem/Solution Argument
  • A Checklist for Revision
  • For Analysis and Debate
  • Peter Edelman, “Poverty in America: Why Can’t We End It”
  • Jonathan Swift, "A Modest Proposal"
  • Suggestions for Discussion and Writing

Chapter 12LOCATING, EVALUATING, AND PREPARING TO USE SOURCES

  • Selecting a Good Topic
  • What Type of Paper Am I Preparing?
  • Who Is My Audience?
  • How Can I Select a Good Topic?
  • What Kinds of Topics Should I Avoid?
  • Writing a Tentative Claim or Research Proposal
  • Preparing a Working Bibliography
  • Basic Form for Books
  • Basic Form for Articles
  • Locating Sources
  • The Book Catalog
  • The Reference Collection
  • Electronic Databases
  • Guidelines for Using Online Databases
  • The Internet
  • Guidelines for Searching the Web
  • Field Research
  • Evaluating Sources, Maintaining Credibility
  • Federal, State, and Local Government Documents
  • Correspondence
  • Interviews
  • Lectures
  • Films, DVDs, Television
  • Surveys, Questionnaires, and Original Research
  • Evaluating Sources, Maintaining Credibility
  • Guidelines for Evaluating Sources
  • Preparing an Annotated Bibliography

Chapter 13WRITING THE RESEARCHED ESSAY

  • Guidelines for Studying Sources
  • Avoiding Plagiarism
  • What Is Common Knowledge?
  • Using Signal Phrases to Avoid Confusion
  • Guidelines for Appropriately Using Sources
  • Organizing the Paper
  • Drafting the Essay
  • Plan Your Time
  • Handle In-Text Documentation as You Draft
  • Choose an Appropriate Writing Style
  • Write Effective Beginnings
  • Avoid Ineffective Openings
  • Compose Solid, Unified Paragraphs
  • Write Effective Conclusions
  • Avoid Ineffective Conclusions
  • Choose an Effective Title
  • Revising the Paper: A Checklist
  • Rewriting
  • Editing
  • Proofreading
  • The Completed Paper
  • Sample Student Essay in MLA Style: David Donaldson, “Tell Us What You Really Are: The Debate over Labeling Genetically Modified Food”

Chapter 14FORMAL DOCUMENTATION: MLA STYLE, APA STYLE

  • Guidelines for Using Parenthetical Documentation
  • The Simplest Patterns of Parenthetical Documentation
  • Placement of Parenthetical Documentation
  • Parenthetical Citations of Complex Sources
  • Preparing MLA Citations for a Works Cited List
  • Forms for Books: Citing the Complete Book
  • Forms for Books: Citing Part of a Book
  • Forms for Periodicals: Articles in Journals and Magazines Accessed in Print
  • Forms for Periodicals: Articles in Newspapers Accessed in Print
  • Forms for Web Sources
  • Forms for Other Print and Nonprint Sources
  • Author/Year or APA Style
  • APA Style: In-Text Citations
  • APA Style: Preparing a List of References
  • Form for Books
  • Form for Articles
  • Form for Electronic Sources
  • Sample Student Essay in APA Style: Carissa Ervine, “The Relationship Between Depression and Marital Status”

SECTION 5A COLLECTION OF READINGS

Chapter 15THE MEDIA: IMAGE AND REALITY

  • Derrick Speight, “Of Losers and Moles: You Think Reality TV Just Writes Itself?”
  • Ann Hornaday, “Zero Dark Thirty and the New Reality of Reported Filmmaking”
  • Katherine Ellison, “What’s Up, Doc? A Bloody Outrage, That's What"
  • Student Essay: Sienna Walker, “Big Pun’s Prophesy”
  • Frank Luntz, “Words We Remember”

Chapter 16 THE INTERNET AND SOCIAL MEDIA: THEIR IMPACT ON OUR LIVES

  • Peggy Orenstein, “I Tweet, Therefore I Am”
  • Susan B. Crawford, “The New Digital Divide”
  • Daniel M. Wegner, “Do Not Fear the Cybermind”
  • Eugeny Morozov, “The Death of the Cyberflâneur”
  • Lori B. Andrews, “Facebook Is Using You”

Chapter 17 MARRIAGE AND GENDER ISSUES: THE DEBATES CONTINUE

  • Michael Kinsley, “Abolish Marriage”
  • Andrew Sullivan, “My Big Fat Straight Wedding”
  • Stephanie Coontz, “The Myth of Male Decline”
  • Meg Jay, “The Downside of Living Together”
  • Kathleen Parker, “Un-hitching the Middle Class”
  • Gloria Steinem, “Supremacy Crimes”

Chapter 18 SPORTS TALK—SPORTS BATTLES

  • John Feinstein, “The Lesson of Penn State”
  • Donald Yee, "Show Them the Money"
  • Sally Jenkins, “Rather Than Pay Athletes, Show Them Respect”
  • Ruth Marcus, "Privilege Unchecked in the U-Va. Case?"
  • Megan Greenwell, “Where Have All the Good Coaches Gone?”
  • Jonathan Vaughters, “How To Get Doping Out of Sports”
  • Branden Allenby, “After Armstrong’s Fall, the Case for Performance Enhancement”

Chapter 19 EDUCATION IN AMERICA: PROBLEMS AT ALL LEVELS

  • Richard Kalenberg, "5 Myths about Who Gets into College"
  • Naomi Schaefer Riley, “What’s a College Education Really Worth? Not Enough”
  • Derek Thompson, “What’s More Expensive Than College? Not Going to College”
  • Danielle Allen, “Helping Students Find Their Place in the World”
  • Howard Gardner, “Why Kids Cheat at Harvard”
  • George Will, “The Closed American Mind”

Chapter 20 THE ENVIRONMENT: HOW DO WE SUSTAIN IT?

  • Michael Novacek, “The Sixth Extinction: It Happened to Him. It’s Happening to You.”
  • Daniel T. Willingham, “Trust Me, I’m a Scientist”
  • James R. Lee, “Global Warming Is Just the Tip of the Iceberg”
  • Art Carden, “On Climate Change, Government Is Not the Answer”
  • Kristen Sheeran and Mindy Lubber, “The Cost of Climate Inaction”

Chapter 21 LAWS AND RIGHTS: GUN CONTROL AND IMMIGRATIONDEBATES

  • Katha Pollitt, “Gun Control? Dream On”
  • Petula Dvorak, “We Can’t Afford the True Cost of Gun Crime”
  • Jay Dickey and Mark Rosenberg, “ ‘Senseless’ Is Not Studying Gun Violence”
  • Amy Chua, “Immigrate, Assimilate”
  • Roberto Suro, “Legal, Illegal”
  • Patricia B. Strait, “When Societies Collide: Part Three: Finding the Best Fit Immigration Model”

Chapter 22 AMERICA: PAST, PRESENT, FUTURE

  • Abraham Lincoln, “Second Inaugural Address”
  • Zainab Chaudary, “Your Most Powerful Currency: Your Vote”
  • Thomas L. Friedman, “Do You Want the Good News First?”
  • Fareed Zakaria, “The Emerging America”
  • Colbert I. King, “We Still Aren’t Good Enough”
  • Kwame Anthony Appiah, “How the Future Will Judge Us”
  • Barack H. Obama, “We Made Ourselves Anew, and Vowed to Move Forward Together”

APPENDIX: UNDERSTANDING LITERATURE

  • Getting the Facts: Active Reading, Summary, and Paraphrase
  • Paul Lawrence Dunbar, "Promise"
  • Kate Chopin, "The Story of an Hour"
  • Summary of "The Story of an Hour"
  • William Shakespeare, "Sonnet 116"
  • Paraphrase of "Sonnet 116"
  • Seeing Connection: Analysis
  • Analysis of Narrative Structure
  • Analysis of Character
  • Analysis of Elements of Style and Tone
  • Drawing Conclusions: Interpretation
  • Writing about Literature
  • Andrew Marvell, "To His Coy Mistress"
  • Christopher Marlowe, "The Passionate Shepherd to His Love"
  • Sir Walter Raleigh, "The Nymph's Reply to the Shepherd"
  • A.E. Housman, "Is My Team Ploughing"
  • Amy Lowell, "Taxi"
  • Ursula K. Le Guin, "The Ones Who Walk Away from Omelas"
  • Susan Glaspell, "Trifles"
  • Sample Student Literary Analysis: Alan Peterson “Faulkner’s Realistic Initiation Theme”
  • Suggestions for Discussion and Writing

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