Reading for the Body: The Recalcitrant Materiality of Southern Fiction, 1893-1985

Overview

Jay Watson argues that southern literary studies has been overidealized and dominated by intellectual history for too long. In Reading for the Body, he calls for the field to be rematerialized and grounded in an awareness of the human body as the site where ideas, including ideas about the U.S. South itself, ultimately happen.

Employing theoretical approaches to the body developed by thinkers such as Karl Marx, Colette Guillaumin, Elaine Scarry, and Friedrich Kittler, Watson ...

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Reading for the Body: The Recalcitrant Materiality of Southern Fiction, 1893-1985

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Overview

Jay Watson argues that southern literary studies has been overidealized and dominated by intellectual history for too long. In Reading for the Body, he calls for the field to be rematerialized and grounded in an awareness of the human body as the site where ideas, including ideas about the U.S. South itself, ultimately happen.

Employing theoretical approaches to the body developed by thinkers such as Karl Marx, Colette Guillaumin, Elaine Scarry, and Friedrich Kittler, Watson also draws on histories of bodily representation to mine a century of southern fiction for its insights into problems that have preoccupied the region and nation alike: slavery, Jim Crow, and white supremacy; the marginalization of women; the impact of modernization; the issue of cultural authority and leadership; and the legacy of the Vietnam War. He focuses on the specific bodily attributes of hand, voice, and blood and the deeply embodied experiences of pain, illness, pregnancy, and war to offer new readings of a distinguished group of literary artists who turned their attention to the South: Mark Twain, Jean Toomer, Zora Neale Hurston, William Faulkner, Richard Wright, Katherine Anne Porter, Bobbie Ann Mason, and Walker Percy.

In producing an intensely embodied U.S. literature these writers, Watson argues, were by turns extending and interrogating a centuries-old tradition in U.S. print culture, in which the recalcitrant materiality of the body serves as a trope for the regional alterity of the South. Reading for the Body makes a powerful case for the body as an important methodological resource for a new southern studies.

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

“A visceral and invigorating study that takes us on a fantastic voyage through southern bodies and narratives, providing superb and often startling readings of texts we thought we knew. Critically sophisticated, daring, and eloquent, Reading for the Body offers a thrilling ride for aficionados of Southern and American literature.”—John Wharton Lowe, Robert Penn Warren Professor, Louisiana State University

Reading for the Body is a landmark study of Southern literature, a magnificent work of scholarship written with crystal clarity. Theoretically sophisticated and historically grounded, Watson’s book repeatedly leads us to new insights, new illuminations. A remarkable achievement.”—Robert H. Brinkmeyer Jr., author of The Fourth Ghost: White Southern Writers and European Fascism, 1930–1950

“[Reading for the Body] is certainly one of the most important books in Southern studies to appear in recent years. . . . Watson is a beautiful writer who has the uncanny ability to make the most difficult arguments surprisingly straightforward.”—Robert H. Brinkmeyer Jr., Southern Register

“This work provides a powerful argument for using the body and as a methodological point of departure for southern studies. . . . Highly recommended.”—C. R. Bloss, Choice

“Reading for the Body interrogates somatic reifications of [the U.S. South’s] paradigms and uncovers subjectivities struggling to understand the world through their corporeal existence. . . .Given how unavoidable bodies are in the current election year’s discourses about war, voter identification laws, women’s reproductive rights, and marriage equality, Watson’s study is quite timely and important.”—Jordan J. Dominy, H-Net Reviews

Reading for the Body is a stimulating approach to southern literature that is well worth pursuing. Watson is provocative in his call for southern studies to avoid ‘over-intellectualization and over-idealization’ by focusing instead on how the somatic experience of fictional southern bodies is portrayed in order to engage and explore this promising hermeneutic.”—Lucas Carpenter, The Journal of Southern History

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780820343389
  • Publisher: University of Georgia Press
  • Publication date: 8/1/2012
  • Series: The New Southern Studies Series
  • Pages: 472
  • Sales rank: 1,422,953
  • Product dimensions: 5.90 (w) x 8.90 (h) x 1.30 (d)

Meet the Author

Jay Watson is the Howry Professor of Faulkner Studies and Professor of English at the University of Mississippi. He is the author of Forensic Fictions: The Lawyer Figure in Faulkner (Georgia) and editor of Conversations with Larry Brown and Faulkner and Whiteness.

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Table of Contents


Acknowledgments

Introduction. Recalcitrant Materialities

Part One. Bodily Attributes
Chapter 1. Manual Discourse: A Problem in Mark Twain's America
Chapter 2. Listening for Zora: Voice, Body, and the Mediat(iz)ed Modernism of Jonah's Gourd Vine and Moses, Man of the Mountain
Chapter 3. Writing Blood: The Art of the Literal in William Faulkner's Light in August

Part Two. Embodied Experiences
Chapter 4. Richard Wright's Parables of Pain: Uncle Tom's Children and the Making and Unmaking of a Southern Black World
Chapter 5. Difficult Embodiment: Coming of Age in Katherine Anne Porter's Miranda Stories
Chapter 6. Reading War on the Body: The Example of Bobbie Ann Mason's In Country

Coda. Overreading (for) the Body: Walker Percy's Cautionary Tale

Notes
Works Cited
Index

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