Reading Hegel's Phenomenology

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Overview

In Reading Hegel’s Phenomenology, John Russon uses the theme of reading to clarify the methods, premises, evidence, reasoning, and conclusions developed in Hegel’s seminal text. Russon’s approach facilitates comparing major sections and movements of the text, and demonstrates that each section of Phenomenology of Spirit stands independently in its focus on the themes of human experience. Along the way, Russon considers the rich relevance of Hegel’s philosophy to understanding other key Western philosophers, such as Aristotle, Descartes, Kant, Husserl, Heidegger, and Derrida. Major themes include language, embodiment, desire, conscience, forgiveness, skepticism, law, ritual, multiculturalism, existentialism, deconstruction, and absolute knowing. An important companion to contemporary Hegel studies, this book will be of interest to all students of Hegel’s philosophy.

Indiana University Press

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Editorial Reviews

Choice

"The 15 chapters each focus on a section of Hegel's book, making this an excellent resource in a course on Hegel's Phenomenology of Spirit. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Upper-level undergraduates through faculty/researchers." —Choice

J. M. Fritzman

Russon's book differs in two ways from other commentaries on Hegel's Phenomenology of Spirit. First, Russon (Univ. of Guelph) considers only the arguments in that text, rather than discussing its literary allusions or historical context. Second, Russon provides independent studies of the arguments in each section of Hegel's text. Whereas it is generally claimed that any part of Hegel's Phenomenology of Spirit can only be comprehended by understanding the part it plays in the text as a whole, Russon instead tries to investigate the arguments of the individual sections on their own terms. One might think that a disadvantage of Russon's approach would be the difficulty of addressing questions about whether Hegel's Phenomenology of Spirit has an overall trajectory and structure. Even if that is correct, however, an examination of the details of the arguments in each section compensates. The 15 chapters each focus on a section of Hegel's book, making this an excellent resource in a course on Hegel's Phenomenology of Spirit. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Upper—level undergraduates through faculty/researchers.J. M. Fritzman, Lewis and Clark College , 2005jun CHOICE

From the Publisher
"The 15 chapters each focus on a section of Hegel's book, making this an excellent resource in a course on Hegel's Phenomenology of Spirit. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Upper-level undergraduates through faculty/researchers." —Choice

Russon's book differs in two ways from other commentaries on Hegel's Phenomenology of Spirit. First, Russon (Univ. of Guelph) considers only the arguments in that text, rather than discussing its literary allusions or historical context. Second, Russon provides independent studies of the arguments in each section of Hegel's text. Whereas it is generally claimed that any part of Hegel's Phenomenology of Spirit can only be comprehended by understanding the part it plays in the text as a whole, Russon instead tries to investigate the arguments of the individual sections on their own terms. One might think that a disadvantage of Russon's approach would be the difficulty of addressing questions about whether Hegel's Phenomenology of Spirit has an overall trajectory and structure. Even if that is correct, however, an examination of the details of the arguments in each section compensates. The 15 chapters each focus on a section of Hegel's book, making this an excellent resource in a course on Hegel's Phenomenology of Spirit. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Upper—level undergraduates through faculty/researchers.J. M. Fritzman, Lewis and Clark College , 2005jun CHOICE

Choice

"The 15 chapters each focus on a section of Hegel's book, making this an excellent resource in a course on Hegel's Phenomenology of Spirit. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Upper-level undergraduates through faculty/researchers." —Choice

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780253216922
  • Publisher: Indiana University Press
  • Publication date: 10/1/2004
  • Series: Studies in Continental Thought Series
  • Pages: 320
  • Sales rank: 1,091,021
  • Product dimensions: 6.12 (w) x 9.25 (h) x 0.93 (d)

Meet the Author

John Russon is Associate Professor of Philosophy at the University of Guelph. He is author of Human Experience: Philosophy, Neurosis, and the Elements of Everyday Life.

Indiana University Press

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Table of Contents

Acknowledgments
A Note on the Text
Introduction
Part 1. Consciousness
1. Sense, Time, and My Meaning
2. From Perception to Philosophy
3. Understanding: Things, Forces, and the Body
Part 2. Self-Consciousness
4. Death and Desire in Hegel's Epistemology: The Form of Hegel's Argument
5. Reading and the Body
6. Hermeneutical Pressure: Intersubjectivity and Objectivity
7. The "Freedom of Self-Consciousness" and Early Modern Epistemology
Part 3. The Absolute
Reason
8. Reason and Dualism
Spirit
9. Spirit and Skepticism
10. The Contradictions of Moral Life: Hegel's Critique of Kant
11. Selfhood, Conscience, and Dialectic
Religion
12. The Ritual Basis of Self-Identity
13. Vision and Image in Hegel's System
14. Deciding to Read: On the Horizon (of Christianity)
Absolute Knowing
15. Absolute Knowing: The Structure and Project of Hegel's System of Science
Notes
Bibliography
Index

Indiana University Press

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