Reading Now (with NEW MyReadingLab with Pearson eText Student Access Code Card) / Edition 1

Other Format (Print)
Used and New from Other Sellers
Used and New from Other Sellers
from $160.99
Usually ships in 1-2 business days
Other sellers (Other Format)
  • All (1) from $160.99   
  • Used (1) from $160.99   

Overview

ALERT: Before you purchase, check with your instructor or review your course syllabus to ensure that you select the correct ISBN. Several versions of Pearson's MyLab & Mastering products exist for each title, including customized versions for individual schools, and registrations are not transferable. In addition, you may need a CourseID, provided by your instructor, to register for and use Pearson's MyLab & Mastering products.

Packages

Access codes for Pearson's MyLab & Mastering products may not be included when purchasing or renting from companies other than Pearson; check with the seller before completing your purchase.

Used or rental books

If you rent or purchase a used book with an access code, the access code may have been redeemed previously and you may have to purchase a new access code.

Access codes

Access codes that are purchased from sellers other than Pearson carry a higher risk of being either the wrong ISBN or a previously redeemed code. Check with the seller prior to purchase.

--

Reading Now engages students through thematic content to connect meaning with reading skill development and a richly illustrated design that delivers key concepts in an inviting way.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

Advance praise for Reading Now

Presenting the skills together is brilliant
I think the idea to cover all of the skills up front and reinforce later is a clever idea. It is difficult to teach the reading process in an artificially segmented way.
--Laurel Severino, Santa Fe College

I love that the pre-reading questions ask them to look at the picture/graph before they read. This helps developmental reading students understand the importance of previewing the photos/graphs.
--Barbara Kashi, Cypress College

I LOVE the use of photographs and graphs, etc. Visuals are very important to readers, they draw the reader in and help them understand what the author is trying to say. Readers learn to use picture clues early on, and if we use them they make the reading selections more interesting for those visual learners.
--Eileen P. Steeples, Middlesex Community College

The first two chapters are excellent. Presenting the “big picture” at the beginning is not done nearly enough in developmental reading textbooks. Students are going to be reading many things in their other classes and need to have an overview as soon as possible. Helping students to see the big picture right at the start is an excellent idea. I really like the major comprehension concepts introduced right at the beginning. Too often developmental reading instruction is presented as a combination of discrete skills. The reality is that all of it relates together. This synthesis of ideas/concepts is very appealing to me.
--Linda Huber Mininger, Harrisburg Area Community College

I like the inclusion of photographs a lot! They are real and students can respond to them in open-ended ways, where cartoons or graphs may require deeper thinking to come to the “right” answer. I think they add tremendously to the chapters, not just for the aesthetic quality of them, but because the author asks the reader to think about them, to answer questions about them, to “read” them, it engages the reader.
--Lynette D. Shaw-Smith, Benedictine University at Springfield

Students are more interested in reading and analyzing current trends and issues, such as politics and global warming. I have seen that using these types of materials have a greater impact on my students’ ability to do well in class when current events are used rather than old material from textbooks. Therefore, I would like to use a text that has up to date material.
--Marisol Varela, Miami Dade College

I love the tone and way the author presents the information. It is very approachable and conversational. I teach my students to ask similar questions with my students in an effort to make them active readers… to show them how to interact with the text… and these questions apply to various types of texts and summarize the reading process very well.
--Karen Larmon Whalen, Collin College

The best part of the book is the selection of readings.
--Lynette D. Shaw-Smith, Benedictine University at Springfield

The questions before and after the reading selections are amazingly comprehensive, thought-provoking, cover the basic skills, but also “dig a little deeper” so the reader makes text-to-self connections, learns vocabulary in a context, is engaged in before, during and after reading strategies… The author designed these questions based on what the reading research suggestions effective readers do, the strategies they have internalized, which our developmental students need help mastering and applying.
--Lynette D. Shaw-Smith, Benedictine University at Springfield

I like the diversity of texts and genres. I like how some of the readings can really help them in the time of their life right now — a subtle message being taught when practicing the skills of reading — nice touch! And I found the articles that I skimmed through very attention-getting and interesting, and I’m sure my students would feel the same way. The literature based readings are good also.
--Rachel Evans, St. Charles Community College

Overall, I feel that the material covered in Reading Now is a complete and comprehensive manual for teaching students how to improve their reading comprehension.
--Rachel Evans, St. Charles Community College

I really liked the chapter content. I sincerely appreciate the vocabulary section as this could potentially eliminate the need for a separate, more costly, vocabulary book purchase. I appreciated the Internet activities because students today are on the Internet more than ever and they enjoy using it for their coursework.

-Melanie Ward, Tyler Junior College

The themes are appealing and seem applicable to real-world reading that a college student is required to complete.
--Linda Huber Mininger, Harrisburg Area Community College

The holistic and specific-skills approach is totally unique. I think it is a more natural way to learn reading skills which engages the brain in problem solving.
--Sandra Jones, Community College of Baltimore County

The readings are current and very interesting and provocative. I think they would also spark discussion and debate and group projects. They excite the teacher in me to think of additional activities for small group work. It is important that one textbook reading is included in each chapter. Students need “real” textbook excerpts to practice the skills on in preparation for their general education classes.
--Sandra Jones, Community College of Baltimore County

The readings are appropriate and interesting. They cover a variety of topics and are timely. They seem to be at the proper level for our developmental students.
--Helen L. Streicher, Kankakee Community College

I found the readings to be very valid for the course. They are real world, relevant, and cross-curricular, three things I struggle to find each semester.
-Melanie Ward, Tyler Junior College

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780321829115
  • Publisher: Longman
  • Publication date: 5/11/2012
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 544
  • Product dimensions: 8.50 (w) x 10.80 (h) x 0.80 (d)

Table of Contents

BRIEF TABLE OF CONTENTS

PART I OVERVIEW OF THE READING PROCESS

Chapter 1 The Active Reader Part 1: Asking the Right Questions

Chapter 2 The Active Reader Part 2: Answering Your Questions

Chapter 3 A Word about Words

PART II SKILL REVIEW AND PRACTICE READINGS

Chapter 4 Everyday Life: Finding the Special in the Ordinary (Skill: Main Idea)

Chapter 5 In the News: Lasting Issues that Spark Debate (Skill: Supporting Details)

Chapter 6 Work and the Dollar: How They Influence Decisions (Skill: Organization)

Chapter 7 Health: Preserving the Mind and Body (Skill: Purpose and Tone)

Chapter 8 Science and Technology: Investigating New Realms (Skill: Making Inferences)

Chapter 9 The Environment: Interacting with a Changing Planet (Skill: Critical Thinking)

Chapter 10 The World: Glimpses of Different Places and Perspectives (Skill: Checklist Review)

PART III ADDITIONAL RESOURCES

Using the Internet

Skimming and Scanning

Forms for Photocopying

DETAILED TABLE OF CONTENTS

Detailed Table of Contents

Preface

To the Student

PART 1 OVERVIEW OF THE READING PROCESS

Chapter 1 The Active Reader Part 1: Asking the Right Questions

Essential Questions to Ask

What Is the Main Idea of the Reading?

How Does the Writer Support the Main Idea?

How Is the Reading Organized?

What Is the Writer’s Purpose?

What Is the Writer’s Tone?

What Can I Infer from the Reading?

What Other Critical-Thinking Skills Do I Need to Use to Fully Appreciate the Reading?

Chapter 2 The Active Reader Part 2: Answering Your Questions

Delivering the Answers

Annotating

Making Connections

Recording Your Findings

Paraphrase

Summary

Outline

Visual Aids

Applying the Techniques

“Sport or Not a Sport” by David Andriesen

Textbook Considerations

Organization

SQ4R Reading Method

Applying the Techniques

“The Nature of Remembering” from Mastering the World of Psychology by Samuel E. Wood, Ellen Green Wood, and Denise Boyd

Short Story Considerations

Plot

Characters and Dialogue

Conflict

Setting and Tone

Symbolism

Theme

Applying the Techniques

“The Stolen Party” by Liliana Heker

Chapter 3 A Word about Words

Expanding Your Vocabulary

Context Clues

Dictionary Use

Dictionary Entries

Online Dictionaries versus Paper Dictionaries

Flash Cards

Multiple Meanings

Denotations and Connotations

Word Parts

Prefixes

Roots

Suffixes

PART 2 SKILL REVIEW AND READINGS

Chapter 4 Everyday Life: Finding the Special in the Ordinary

Main Ideas

The Topic

Topic Sentences

Thesis Statements and Implied Main Ideas

Readings

“Get Time on Your Side” by Jennifer Nichols

“The Blessed Bean: There’s Nothing on Earth like Coffee" by Slim Randles

“Professor Delves into Odd Culture of Freshmen” by Michelle Roberts

“Behind Every Grad …” by Thomas L. Friedman

“Socialization” from Essentials of Sociology: A Down-to-Earth Approach by James M. Henslin

“Thank You, Ma’am” by Langston Hughes

Chapter 5 In the News: Lasting Issues that Spark Debate

Supporting Details

Major and Minor Supporting Details

Types of Supporting Details

Examples

Statistics

Testimony

Reasons

Fact or Opinion

Evaluating Supporting Details

Readings

“We Need to Get Smart about Marijuana” by Rick Steves

“Have Gun, Will Show It” by Nicholas Riccardi

“Under Whom?” editorial from the Los Angeles Times

“Complexion” from Hunger of Memory: The Education of Richard Rodriguez by Richard Rodriguez

“Identity in Contemporary America” from Created Equal by Jacqueline Jones, Peter H. Wood, Thomas Borstelmann, Elaine Tyler May, and Vicki L. Ruiz

“Harrison Bergeron” by Kurt Vonnegut

Chapter 6 Work and the Dollar: How They Influence Decisions

Organization

Methods of Ordering Information

Patterns of Organization

Transition Words and Phrases

Readings

“Life Stages of Debt” by Sheyna Steiner

“How to Buy Happiness: Choosing between Stuff and Experiences” by Cynthia G. Wagner

“For Love or Money: Workers Weigh Professional Passion with the Need to Make a Living” by Michelle Goodman

“School Again” from Dust Tracks on a Road by Zora Neale Hurston

“Becoming Financially Independent” from Planning Your Future: Keys to Financial Freedom by Stephan Konowalow

“Hot Dog Grotto” by Katy Tallorin

Chapter 7 Health: Preserving the Mind and Body

Purpose and Tone

Purpose

Tone

Selecting Tone Words

Readings

“The Great Awakening” by Catherine Price

“Sun Savvy: Myth or Reality? From Blistering to Bronze, the Truth about Tanning” by Tracy Davis

“Cross-Train Your Brain” by Kate Hanley

“How We Eat Reflects and Defines Our Personal and Cultural Identity” from Eating Well for Optimum Health by Andrew Weil, M.D.

“Healthy Relationships” from Access to Health by Rebecca J. Donatelle

“The Masque of the Red Death” by Edgar Allan Poe

Chapter 8 Science and Technology: Investigating New Realms

Making Inferences

Inference Clues

Bias

Readings

“Kids Led the Way, But Texting’s GR8 for All” by Kevin Simpson

“Constant Techno Communication Brings Lack of Focus and Loss of Privacy” by Eric Adler and Laura Bauer

“Happily Ever Laughter” by Peter Doskoch

“In the Mountain Meadow” from Gorillas in the Mist by Dian Fossey

“Responding to Stress” from Mastering the World of Psychology by Samuel E. Wood, Ellen Green Wood, and Denise Boyd

“Virtuoso” by Herbert Goldstone

Chapter 9 The Environment: Interacting with a Changing Planet

Critical Thinking

Faulty Logic

Figurative Language

Readings

“Where to Hide from Mother Nature” by Brendan I. Koerner

“Stuffing a Lifetime into a Suitcase” by Janet Eastman and Bettijane Levine

“Mayors Take the Lead” by Anne Underwood

“Surface Waters and Underground Seas” from Silent Spring by Rachel Carson

“What Makes Cities Livable?” from Environmental Science by Richard T. Wright

“The Phoenix” by Sylvia Townsend Warner

Chapter 10 The World: Glimpses of Different Places and Perspectives

Checklist Review

SQ4R Method

Main Idea

Supporting Details

Organization

Purpose and Tone

Inference

Critical Thinking

Short Story

Readings

“Journey to the Seven Wonders” by Tony Perrottet

“Country of Longitudinal Essences” from My Invented Country by Isabel Allende

“Mongolia . . . Dancing in the Village of Delight” by Louisa Waugh

“Uluru from In a Sunburned Country” by Bill Bryson

“Gestures” from Essentials of Sociology: A Down-to-Earth Approach by James M. Henslin

“Folktales From Around the World: The Roaming Horse, Snake’s Promise, Cat and Fox in the Forest, and Crossing the Lake”

PART 3 ADDITIONAL RESOURCES

Using the Internet

Skimming and Scanning

Skimming

Scanning

Forms for Photocopying

Reading Review Form

Evidence Chart

Checklists

SQ4R Method

Main Idea

Supporting Details

Evaluating Supporting Details

Organization

Purpose and Tone

Inference

Critical Thinking

Short Story

Glossary

Credits

Index

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)