Ready, Set, Skip!
  • Ready, Set, Skip!
  • Ready, Set, Skip!

Ready, Set, Skip!

by Jane O'Connor, Ann James
     
 

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This little girl can leap, creep, twirl, skate, burp, slurp, and do all the other things kids love to do-except skip! But with the help of a clever suggestion from her mom, she soon finds herself skipping all the way to school. Ready, Set, Skip! is an upbeat, lively readaloud about learning that what you think you can't do may only be a hop, skip, and a jump away!  See more details below

Overview

This little girl can leap, creep, twirl, skate, burp, slurp, and do all the other things kids love to do-except skip! But with the help of a clever suggestion from her mom, she soon finds herself skipping all the way to school. Ready, Set, Skip! is an upbeat, lively readaloud about learning that what you think you can't do may only be a hop, skip, and a jump away!

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly

The likable young narrator of O'Connor's (Fancy Nancy) buoyant tale first admits what she can't do: "I can't skip. I wish I could. Other kids are really good." But she is mighty proud of what she cando: "I can leap. I can creep. Can I twirl? Just watch this girl." Rollerskating, whistling and somersaulting are some of the other feats she proudly demonstrates. When she reiterates that she can't skip (endearingly adding, "It's not my fault."), her mother asks her if she can hop. The gal gleefully shows off her hopping prowess and her parent instructs her to hop first on one foot and then on the other: "That is skipping." The woman then shows how it is done as the girl wryly observes, "Down the street I watch Mom go. She's pretty old to skip, I know." Making sure there are no kids watching, the exuberant child gives skipping a try and adds another accomplishment to her repertoire-she even skips right past her mother. James's (the Penny Pollard series) unadorned illustrations convey the heroine's changeable emotions and abundant energy as she struts her stuff, accompanied by her perky pooch. The tale's simple text and breezy rhyme makes this a good choice for reading aloud to preschoolers or for readers just starting to sound out words. But grownups beware: youngsters will surely be tempted to mimic the high-spirited girl's antics, so they shouldn't be expected to sit still. Ages 4-up. (May)

Copyright 2007 Reed Business Information
Children's Literature
Do you know how to skip? The little girl in this story does not, but she does know how to do numerous other things. The book is full of her varied accomplishments, which include skating, twirling, leaping and creeping. But, she does not know how to skip. Then one day, her mother teaches her that skipping is hopping on one foot and then another. Pretty soon, the little girl is good at skipping--and she wants to skip everywhere. This well-written book is perfect for children who are learning how to skip. The book will teach them step by step (literally) how to learn this important coordinated skill. The illustrations are simple, but perfectly coordinated with the text in the book. They demonstrate all of the actions the little girl is experiencing. This is a timeless picture book that will teach children for generations the simple skill of skipping. Reviewer: Nicole Peterson
School Library Journal

PreS-K
This cheerful book features a little girl who demonstrates for her sympathetic dog all the things that she can do (whistle, skate, leap, creep, etc.), with one exception: "But I can't skip./It's not my fault." Her mother overhears her and asks if she can hop-of course she can-many times. With Mom's help, from hopping to skipping is easy: "My feet are flying!/Skipping's cool./Tomorrow I can skip.../to school." Exuberant color and black line illustrations on a white background depict the actions with élan and convey the special camaraderie between girl and dog and mother and daughter. Although one might question whether skipping is harder to learn than roller skating or whistling, children who haven't mastered a particular skill will be reassured and entertained by the story.
—Judith ConstantinidesCopyright 2006 Reed Business Information.

Kirkus Reviews
The narrator of this effervescent exercise in rhyme cannot skip. She can leap, creep, twirl, skate and "BURRRRRRRRRRP!"-but itches to add skipping to her repertoire. Her wise mom asks, "Can you hop?" and, after a perfectly child-calibrated burst of same ("I can hop and / never stop! / Watch!"), bestows the key to the elusive gait. "‘Hop on one foot. / then the other. / That is skipping,' says my mother." O'Connor's deft turns of phrase masterfully capture the initial glumness and ensuing buoyancy, delivering a text perfectly pitched for both storytime kids and emergent readers. Australian illustrator James's charcoal-shaded watercolors beautifully limn that buoyancy, capturing the narrator's whirling activity and multifold facial expressions in spot illustrations against a crisp white layout. In a brown bob cut, shorts and bare feet, this little one (with her constant companion, a doting dog redolent of Marc Simont), embodies a hallmark symbiosis of childhood-joy expressed as movement, and movement, a joy in itself. (Picture book. 4-6)

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780670062164
Publisher:
Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date:
05/17/2007
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
9.34(w) x 10.30(h) x 0.39(d)
Age Range:
4 - 7 Years

Meet the Author

Jane O'Connor lives in New York City.

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