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Real Essays with Readings: Writing for Success in College, Work, and Everyday Life / Edition 4

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Overview

Real Essays delivers the powerful message that good writing, thinking, and reading skills are both essential and achievable.  From the inspiring stories told by former students in Profiles of Success to the practical strategies for community involvement in the new Community Connections, Real Essays helps students to connect the writing class with their real lives and with the expectations of the larger world.  So that students don’t get overwhelmed, the book focuses first on the most important things in each area, such as the Four Most Serious Errors in grammar; the Four Basics of each rhetorical strategy; and the academic skills of summary, analysis, and synthesis. Read the preface.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780312648084
  • Publisher: Bedford/St. Martin's
  • Publication date: 12/28/2011
  • Edition description: Fourth Edition
  • Edition number: 4
  • Pages: 912
  • Sales rank: 85,114
  • Product dimensions: 7.30 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 1.10 (d)

Meet the Author

Susan Anker (B.A., M.Ed., Boston University) brings a unique perspective to the teaching of the developmental writing course. She taught English and developmental writing before entering college publishing, where she worked for 18 years: as a sales representative and English/ESL editor at Macmillan Publishing Company; as developmental English/ESL editor, executive editor, and editor in chief at St. Martin’s Press; and as vice president and editor in chief for humanities at Houghton Mifflin Company. In each of these positions, she worked with developmental writing instructors and students, maintaining her early interest in the field.

 

Since the publication of the first edition of Real Writing in 1998, Anker has traveled extensively to campuses across the country, continuing her conversations with instructors and students and giving workshops and presentations. She believes that the writing course is, for many students, their first, best opportunity to learn the skills they will need to succeed in college and achieve their goals.

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Table of Contents

* Reading selection new to this edition.

 

Part 1: College Thinking, Reading, and Writing

 

1. Succeeding in College: What You Need to Know
        Practice: Your Educational Experiences Advice from Those Who have Been There

Writing
    Reading and Thinking
    Instructor Expectations
    The Big Picture Four strategies for Success

    Identify Your Goals
        Writing Goals
         Degree Goals
     Manage Your Time
         Make a Course Calendar
         Make a General Calendar
 Use All Resources
          Activity 1: Find Your Resources
     Connect to the College 
     Islam Elshami, “Why Join the Club?” 

        Activity 2: Read to Understand
          Activity 3: Find the Clubs Writing Assignments [1-3]
 
2. Thinking Critically: Developing Your Power of Mind Understand What Critical Thinking Is
        Practice 1: Analyzing a Situation
    Assumptions and Biases Critical Thinking: Key College Skills
    Box: Critical Thinking
    Summary
    Analysi

    Synthesis

    Evaluation 

        Practice 2: Summarize, Analyze, Synthesize, Evaluate
 
3. Reading Critically: Developing Your Understanding Understand What Critical Reading Is
 The Critical Reading Process
 Box: 2PR: The Critical Reading Process
 Preview the Readings
  Read the Title, Head Note, and Introductory Paragraphs
  Read Headings, Key Words, and Definitions
  Look for Summaries, Checklists, and Chapter Reviews
  Read the Conclusion
  Ask a Guiding Question
 Read the Piece: Find the Main Point and the Support
  Main Point and Purpose
  Practice 1: Finding the Main Point
  Support and Logical Fallacies
  Practice 2: Identifying Support
  Either/Or Extremes
  Bad Analogy
  Circular Reasoning
  “Everyone Knows”
  Mistaken Causes or Effects
  Overgeneralization
  Oversimplification
  Slippery Slope
  “This, so That”
  Practice 3:  Identifying Faulty Reasoning
 Pause to Think
 Review and Respond
 Box: Critical Thinking and Reading
 Deborah Tannen, “It Begins at the Beginning”
Reading Visual Images
 Summary
  Dominant Elements
  Figure and Objects
  Practice 4: Summarizing a Visual Image
 Analysis
  Practice 5: Analyzing a Visual Image
 Synthesis
  Practice 6: Synthesizing a Visual Image
 Evaluate
  Practice 7: Evaluating a Visual Image
 Box: Critical Thinking and Visual Images Reading Real-World Documents
  Practice 8: Reading a Real-World Document
  Practice 9: Reading Real-World Documents Writing Assignments [1-4]

 

4. Writing Basics: Audience, Purpose, and Process Box: Four Basics of Good Writing Understand Audience and Purpose
 Audience
  Situation
  Practice 1: Understanding Audience
 Purpose
  Practice 2: Understanding Purpose Understand Paragraph and Essays Forms
 Paragraph Structure
 Essay Structure Understand the Writing Process
[Flow Chart:] The Writing Process
  Practice 3:  What Is an Idea?
Understand Grading Criteria Box: Sample Essay Rubric Sample Student Essays [1-3]
Writing about Readings
 Documenting Sources
 Box: Critical Thinking: Writing about Readings Writing Assignments [1-5]

 

5. Finding and Exploring Your Topic: Choosing Something to Write About Understand What a Good Topic Is
  Practice 1: Finding a Good Topic Narrow Your Topic
 Ask Yourself Questions
 Map Your Ideas
 List Narrower Topics
  Practice 2: Narrowing a Topic Explore Your Topic
 Use Prewriting Techniques
  Freewrite
  List and Brainstorm
  Ask a Reporter’s Questions
  Discuss
  Cluster and Map
 Use the Internet
 Keep a Journal
   Practice 3: Prewriting
 Writer Your Own Topic

 

6. Making a Point: Writing Your Thesis Statement Understand What a Good Thesis Statement Is Practice Developing a Good Thesis Statement
 Writing a Thesis That Focuses on a Single Main Point
 Write a Thesis That Is neither Too Broad nor Too Narrow
 Write a Thesis That Is Specific
 Write a Thesis That You Can Show, Explain, or Prove
 Write a Thesis That Is Forceful and Confident
  Practice 1: Develop a Thesis Statement from a Narrowed Topic
  Practice 2: Write Thesis Statements That Focus on a Single Main Point
  Practice 3: Write Thesis Statements That Are Not Too Broad or Too    Narrow
  Practice 4: Write Thesis Statements That Are Specific
  Practice 5: Write Thesis Statements That You Can Show, Explain, or    Prove
  Practice 6: Write Forceful Thesis Statements
  Practice 7: Revising Thesis Statements Write Your Own Thesis Statement Writing Assignments [1-2]
Checklist: Writing a Thesis Statement

 

7. Supporting Your Point: Finding Details, Examples, and Facts Understand What Support Is Practice Supporting a Thesis Statement
 Prewrite to Find Support
  Practice 1: Prewrite to Find Support
  Drop Unrelated Ideas
  Practice 2: Drop Unrelated Ideas
 Select the Best Support Points
  Practice 3: Select the Best Support Points
 Add Supporting Details
  Practice 4: Add Supporting Details
 Write Topic Sentences for Your Support Points
  Practice 5: Write Topic Sentences and Supporting Details Review Support Writing Assignments [1-2]
Checklist:  Supporting Your Thesis

 

8. Writing a Draft: Putting Your Ideas Together Understand What a Draft Is Arrange Your Ideas
 Chronological Order
 Spatial Order
 Order of Importance Make a Plan
  Practice 1: Outlining an Essay Practice Writing a Draft
 Draft the Body of the Essay
  Practice 2: Writing Topic Sentences
 Write an Introduction
  Start with a Surprising Fact or Idea
  Open with a Quotation
  Give an Example or Tell a Story
  Offer a Strong Opinion
  Ask a Question
  Practice 3: Identify Strong Introductions
  Practice 4: Sell Your Main Point
 Write a Conclusion
  Practice 5: Analyze Conclusions
  Practice 6: Identify Good Introductions and Conclusions
  Practice 7: Write a Conclusion
 Title Your Essay
  Practice 8: Write a Title Write Your Own Draft Deshon Briggs, “You Are the Change in Your Life” (outline and draft) *
Writing Assignments [1-2]
Checklist:  Writing a Draft Essay
 
9. Revising Your Draft: Improving Your Essay Understand What Revision Is Understand What Peer Review Is
 Box: Questions for Peer Reviewers Practice Revising for Unity
  Practice 1: Evaluate Unity
  Practice 2: Revise for Unity Practice Revising for Support and Detail
  Practice 3: Evaluate Support
  Practice 4: Revise for Support Practice Revising for Coherence
 Box: Common Transitional Words and Phrases
  Practice 5: Add Transitional Words
  Practice 6: Add Transitional Sentences
  Practice 7: Add Transitions Revise Your Own Essay Deshon Briggs, “You Are the Change in Your Life”
Revising Assignments [1-2]

Part 2: Writing Different Kinds of Essays


10. Narration: Writing That Tells Stories Understand What Narration Is
 Main Point in Narration
  Practice 1: Determining the Main Point
 Support in Narration
  Point of View
  Major Events and Details
  Dialogue
 Organization in Narration Read and Analyze Narration Narration in College: Jordan Brown, “A Return to Education”
Narration at Work: Profile of Success: Monique Rizer, Journalist and Development Associate. “When Students Are Parents”
Narration in Everyday Life: Howard White, “The Power of Hello” *
Write a Narration Essay
 Assignment 1 Writing about College, Work, and Everyday Life
 Assignment 2: Writing about an Image
 Assignment 3: Writing to Solve a Problem
 Assignment 4: Writing about Connections
 Assignment 5: Writing about Readings Writing Guide: Narration

 

11. Illustration: Writing That Shows Examples Understand What Illustration Is
 Main Point in Illustration
 Support in Illustration
 Organization in Illustration Read and Analyze Illustration Illustration in College: Luz Medina, “To Vice President, Student Affairs”
Illustration at Work: Profile of Success: Juan Gonzalez, Vice President of Student Affairs, University of Texas, Austin: “Address to New Students”
Illustration in Everyday Life: Rob Walker, “Stuck on You” *
Write an Illustration Essay Assignment 1 Writing about College, Work, and Everyday Life
 Assignment 2: Writing about an Image
 Assignment 3: Writing to Solve a Problem
 Assignment 4: Writing about Connections
 Assignment 5: Writing about Readings Writing Guide: Illustration

 

12. Description: Writing That Creates Pictures in Words Understand What Description Is
 Main Point in Description
 Support in Description
 Organization in Description Read and Analyze a Description Essay Description in College: Florence Bagley, “Photograph of My Father Description at Work: Profile of Success: Alex Espinoza, Writer and Associate Professor: “From Still Water Saints
Description in Everyday Life: Jennifer Orlando, “Rattlesnake Canyon: A Place of Peace and Beauty”
Write a Description Essay Assignment 1 Writing about College, Work, and Everyday Life
 Assignment 2: Writing about an Image
 Assignment 3: Writing to Solve a Problem
 Assignment 4: Writing about Connections
 Assignment 5: Writing about Readings Writing Guide: Description

 

13. Process Analysis: Writing That Explains How Things Happen Understand What Process Analysis Is Main Point in Process Analysis
 Support in Process Analysis
 Organization in Process Analysis Read and Analyze a Process Analysis Essay Process Analysis in College: Daniel Flanagan, “The Choice to Do It Over Again” *
Process Analysis at Work: Profile of Success: Patty Maloney, Clinical Nurse Specialist: “A Report on a Patient”
Process Analysis in Everyday Life: Michael Gates Gill, “How I Learned to Be a Barista” *
Write a Process Analysis Essay Assignment 1 Writing about College, Work, and Everyday Life
 Assignment 2: Writing about an Image
 Assignment 3: Writing to Solve a Problem
 Assignment 4: Writing about Connections
 Assignment 5: Writing about Readings Writing Guide: Process Analysis

 

14. Classification: Writing That Puts Things into Groups Understand What Is Classification
 Main Point in Classification
 Support in Classification
 Organization in Classification Read and Analyze a Classification Essay Classification in College: Josef Ameur, “Videogame Genres” *
Classification at Work: Profile of Success: Rebeka Mazzone, Accountant: “Serving on a Nonprofit Board Need Not be Onerous” *
Classification in Everyday Life: Dylan Marcos, “Bad Roommates”
Write a Classification Essay Assignment 1 Writing about College, Work, and Everyday Life
 Assignment 2: Writing about an Image
 Assignment 3: Writing to Solve a Problem
 Assignment 4: Writing about Connections
 Assignment 5: Writing about Readings Writing Guide: Classification

 

15. Definition: Writing That Tells What Something Means Understand What Definition Is
 Main Point in Definition
 Support in Definition
 Organization in Definition Read and Analyze a Definition Essay Definition in College: Anna Puiia, “What is Hip?” *
Definition at Work: Profile of Success: Gary Knoblock, Business Owner:  “Mission Statement to Customers”
Definition in Everyday Life: Baxter Holmes, “My Date with 15 Women” *
Write a Definition Essay Assignment 1 Writing about College, Work, and Everyday Life
 Assignment 2: Writing about an Image
 Assignment 3: Writing to Solve a Problem
 Assignment 4: Writing about Connections
 Assignment 5: Writing about Readings Writing Guide: Definition

 

16. Comparison and Contrast: Writing That Shows Similarities and Differences
 Understand What Comparison and Contrast Is
 Main Point in Comparison and Contrast
 Support in Comparison and Contrast
 Organization in Comparison and Contrast Read and Analyze a Comparison and Contrast Essay Comparison and Contrast in College: “When the Regulation of Eating Behavior Fails”
Comparison and Contrast at Work: Profile of Success:  Garth Vaz, Physician:  “Dyslexia”
Comparison and Contrast in Everyday Life: Stephanie Lindsley, “Autism and Education” *
Write a Comparison and Contrast Essay Assignment 1 Writing about College, Work, and Everyday Life Alternate Assignment 1: Writing about Comparison and Contrast in Everyday Life
 Assignment 2: Writing about an Image
 Assignment 3: Writing to Solve a Problem
 Assignment 4: Writing about Connections
 Assignment 5: Writing about Readings Writing Guide: Comparison and Contrast

 

17. Cause and Effect: Writing That Explains Reasons or Results Understand What Cause and Effect Is
 Main Point in Cause and Effect
 Support in Cause and Effect
 Organization in Cause and Effect Read and Analyze a Cause and Effect Essay Cause and Effect in College: Jeanine Pepper, “Effects of Social Deprivation on Infants” *
Cause and Effect at Work: Profile of Success: Jolanda Jones:  Attorney, Houston City Councilor, and Consultant:  “Consider the Effects of Your Actions: A Talk to Students”
Cause and Effect in Everyday Life: Christopher Shea, “In Praise of Peer Pressure”
Write a Cause and Effect Essay Assignment 1 Writing about College, Work, and Everyday Life
 Assignment 2: Writing about an Image
 Assignment 3: Writing to Solve a Problem
 Assignment 4: Writing about Connections
 Assignment 5: Writing about Readings Writing Guide: Cause and Effect

 

18. Argument: Writing That Persuades Understand What Argument Is
 Main Point in Argument
  Practice 1: Writing a Statement of Your Position
 Support in Argument
  Reasons and Evidence
  Opposing Positions
  Practice 2:  Acknowledging and Addressing the Opposing View
  Faulty Reasoning
 Organization in Argument Read and Analyze an Argument Essay Argument in College: Donnie Ney, “Attendance in College Classes”
Argument at Work: Profile of Success: Shawn Brown, Founder, Diamond Educators: “Letter in Support of a Student”
Argument in Everyday Life: John Around Him, “Letter to Senator Kerry”
Write an Argument Essay Assignment 1 Writing about College, Work, and Everyday Life
 Assignment 2: Writing about an Image
 Assignment 3: Writing to Solve a Problem
 Assignment 4: Writing about Connections
 Assignment 5: Writing about Readings Writing Guide: Argument

Part 3: Special College Writing Projects

 

19. Writing under Pressure: Tests and Essay Exams Studying for Tests
 Ask about the Test
 Predict What Will Be on the Exam
 Use Study Aids
 Review Actively Test-Taking Strategies
 Be Prepared
 Manage Your Nerves
 Understand the Directives
 Survey the Whole Exam before Starting
 Read and Analyze the Question
 Write a Thesis Statement
 Make an Outline
 Write Your Answer
 Read and Revise Your Answer
 Writing an Essays for a Writing Test

 

20. Finding and Evaluating Outside Sources: Preparing to Write a Research Essay Find Sources
 Consult a Librarian
 Use Library Resources
  Books
  Keyword Searches
  Online Databases / Periodical Indexes
  Encyclopedias
 Use Other Resources
  Open Databases
  Search Engines
  Statistical Sources
  Online Research Sites Interview People Evaluate Sources
 Questions for Evaluating All Sources
  Who Is the Author?
  Is the Source Well-known and Respected?
  Is the Source Up-to-Date?
  Is the Source Unbiased?
 Questions for Evaluating Web sites

 

 21. Writing the Research Essay: Using Outside Sources Make a Schedule Choose a Topic Avoid Plagiarism
 Keep a Running Bibliography
 Keep a Card for Each Piece of Information You Might Use
 Indirect Quotation: Summary
 Indirect Quotation: Paraphrase
 Direct Quotation Write a Thesis Statement Make an Outline Write Your Essay Cite Your Sources
 Use In-Text Citations within Your Essay
 Directory of MLA In-Text Citations Revise and Edit Your Essay Sample Student Research Essay:  Michael McQuiston, “To Be Green or not To Be Green” *
Writing Guide: Research Essay

 

Part 4: The Four Most Serious Errors

 

22. The Basic Sentence: An Overview The Four Most Serious Errors The Parts of Speech The Basic Sentence
 Subjects
 Verbs
  Action Verbs
  Linking Verbs
  Helping Verbs
 Complete Thoughts Six Basic Sentence Patterns Edit Paragraphs and Your Own Writing

 

23. Fragments: Incomplete Sentences Understand What Fragments Are
 In the Real World, Why Is It Important to Correct Fragments?
Find and Correct Fragments
 Fragments That Start with Prepositions
 Fragments That Start with Dependent Words
 Fragments That Start with –ing Verb Forms
 Fragments That Start with to and a Verb
 Fragments That Start with Examples or Explanations Edit Paragraphs and Your Own Writing

 

24. Run-Ons: Two Sentences Joined Incorrectly Understand What Run-Ons Are
 In the Real World, Why Is It Important to Correct Run-Ons?
Find and Correct Run-Ons
 Add a Period
 Add a Semicolon
 Add a Comma and a Coordinating Conjunction
 Add a Dependent Word
 A Word That Can Cause Run-Ons: Then
Edit Paragraphs and Your Own Writing

 

25. Problems with Subject-Verb Agreement: When Subjects and Verbs Do Not Match Understand What Subject-Verb Agreement Is In the Real World, Why Is It Important to Correct Subject-Verb Agreement Problems?
Find and Correct Errors in Subject-Verb Agreement
 The Verb Is a Form of Be, Have, or Do
 Words Come between the Subject and the Verb
  Prepositional Phrase between the Subject and the Verb
  Dependent Clause between the Subject and the Verb
 The Sentence Has a Compound Subject
 The Subject Is an Indefinite Pronoun
 The Verb Comes before the Subject
  Questions
  Sentences That Begin with Here or There
Edit Paragraphs and Your Own Writing

 

26. Verb Problems: Avoiding Mistakes in Verb Tense Understand What Verb Tense Is
 In the Real World, Why Is It Important to Use Correct Verbs?
Use Correct Verbs
 Regular Verbs
  Present Tense
  Past Tense
  Future Tense
 Irregular Verbs
  Present-Tense Irregular Verbs
  Past-Tense Irregular Verbs
 Passive Voice
 Consistency of Verb Tense Verb Tense Reference Charts Edit Paragraphs and Your Own Writing

Part 5: Other Grammar Concerns

 

27. Pronouns: Using Substitutes for Nouns Understand What Pronouns Are Practice Using Pronouns Correctly
 Check for Pronoun Agreement
  Indefinite Pronouns
  Collective Nouns
 Making Pronoun Reference Clear
  Avoid Ambiguous or Vague Pronoun References
  Avoid Repetitious Pronoun References
 Use the Right Type of Pronoun
  Subject Pronouns
  Object Pronouns
  Possessive Pronouns
  Pronouns Used with Compound Subjects and Objects
  Pronouns Used in Comparisons
  Choosing between Who and Whom
 Make Pronouns Consistent Edit Paragraphs and Your Own Writing
 
28. Adjectives and Adverbs: Describing Which One? or How?
Understand What Adjectives and Adverbs Are Practice Using Adjectives and Adverbs Correctly
 Choosing between Adjective and Adverb Forms
 Using Adjectives and Adverbs in Comparisons
 Using Good, Well, Bad, and Badly
Edit Paragraphs and Your Own Writing

 

29. Misplaced and Dangling Modifiers: Avoiding Confusing Descriptions Understand What Misplaced Modifiers Are
 Misplaced Modifiers
 Dangling Modifiers Practice Correcting Misplaced and Dangling Modifiers Edit Paragraphs and Your Own Writing

 

30. Coordination and Subordination: Joining Ideas Understand Coordination and Subordination Practice Using Coordination and Subordination
 Using Coordinating Conjunctions
 Using Semicolons
 Using Subordinating Conjunctions Edit Paragraphs and Your Own Writing

31. Parallelism: Balancing Ideas Understand What Parallelism Is Practice Writing Parallel Sentences
 Parallelism in Pairs and Lists
 Parallelism in Comparisons
 Parallelism in Certain Paired Words Edit Paragraphs and Your Own Writing

 

32. Sentence Variety: Putting Rhythm in Your Writing Understand What Sentence Variety Is Practice Creating Sentence Variety
 Start Some Sentences with Adverbs
 Join Ideas Using an –ing Verb Form
 Join Ideas Using an –ed Verb Form
 Join Ideas Using an Appositive
 Join Ideas Using an Adjective Clause Edit Paragraphs and Your Own Writing

 

33. Formal English and ESL: Grammar Trouble Spots for Multilingual Students Basic Sentence Patterns Statements Negatives Questions
There Is and There Are
Pronouns
 Confusing Subject and Object Pronouns
 Confusing Gender
 Leaving Out a Pronoun
 Using a Pronoun to Repeat a Subject
 Using Relative Pronouns Verbs
 The Simple Tenses
  The Simple Present
  The Simple Past
  The Simple Future
 The Progressive Tenses
  The Present Progressive
  The Past Progressive
  The Future Progressive
 The Perfect Tenses
  The Present Perfect
  The Past Perfect
  The Future Perfect
 Gerunds and Infinitives
 Modal Auxiliaries
  Should/Must
  Could/Would
  Modals and Present-Perfect Verbs
 Articles
  Using Definite and Indefinite Articles
  Using Articles with Count and Noncount Nouns
 Prepositions
  Prepositions after Adjectives
  Prepositions after Verbs

Part 6: Word Use

 

34. Word Choice: Avoiding Language Pitfalls Understanding the Importance of Choosing Words Carefully
 Dictionary
 Thesaurus Practice Avoiding Four Common Word-Choice Problems
 Vague and Abstract Words
 Slang
 Wordy Language
 Clichés Edit Paragraphs and Your Own Writing

 

35. Commonly Confused Words: Avoiding Mistakes with Sound-Alikes Understand Why Certain Words Are Commonly Confused Practices Using Commonly Confused Words Correctly Edit Paragraphs and Your Own Writing

 

Part 7: Punctuation and Capitalization

 

36. Commas    
Understand What Commas Do Practice Using Commas Correctly
 Commas between Items in a Series
 Commas between Coordinate Adjectives
 Commas in Compound Sentences
 Commas after Introductory Word Groups
 Commas around Appositives and Interrupters
 Commas around Adjective Clauses
 Other Uses for Commas
  Commas with Quotation Marks
  Commas in Addresses
  Commas in Dates
  Commas with Names
  Commas with Yes or No Edit Paragraphs and Your Own Writing

 

37. Apostrophes   
Understand What Apostrophes Do Practice Using Apostrophes Correctly
 Apostrophes to Show Ownership
  Its or It’s
 Apostrophes in Contractions
 Apostrophes with Letters, Numbers, and Time Edit Paragraphs and Your Own Writing

 

38. Quotation Marks 
Understand What Quotation Marks Do Practice Using Quotation Marks Correctly
 Quotation Marks for Direct Quotations
  Setting Off a Quotation within another Quotation
 No Quotation Marks for Indirect Quotations
 Quotation Marks for Certain Titles Edit Paragraphs and Your Own Writing

 

39. Other Punctuation  
Understand What Punctuation Does Practice Using Punctuation Correctly
 Semicolon
  Semicolons to Join Independent Clauses (Sentences)
  Semicolons When Items in a Series Contain Commas
 Colon :
  Colons before Lists
  Colons before Explanations or Examples
  Colons in Business Correspondence
 Parentheses 
 Dash
 Hyphen
  Hyphens to Join Words That Form a Single Description
  Hyphens to Divide a Word at the End of a Line
 Edit Paragraphs and Your Own Writing

 

40. Capitalization: Using Capital Letters Understand Capitalization Practice Capitalization
 Capitalization of Names of Specific People, Places, Dates, and Things
  People
  Places
  Dates
  Organizations, Companies, and Groups
  Languages, Nationalities, and Religious Courses
  Commercial Products
 Capitalization of Titles Edit Paragraphs and Your Own Writing

 

Editing Review Tests
[1-10]

 

Part 8: Readings for Writers

41. Narration Beth Trimmer, “Birdshot” *
Langston Hughes, “Salvation”
M. Catherine Maternowska, “Lives: Truck-Stop Girls” *
Linked Readings: The Pressure to Conform; Overcoming Adversity and Trauma; Conceptions of Gender

 

42. Illustration Tam Nguyen, “Reflection” *
Kathleen Vail, “Words that Wound”
Deborah Rhodes, “Why Looks Are the Last Bastion of Discrimination” *
Linked Readings: The Pressure to Conform; Chasing Beauty; The Costs of War

 

43. Description Heaven Morrisson, “My Kingdom” *
Alex Espinoza, “An American in Mexico”
Mary Brave Bird, “The Sweat Bath Ritual"

Linked Readings: Feeling Foreign; Experiences that Change Us; Family Ties

 

44. Process Analysis Katie Whitehead, “How to Avoid Carpal Tunnel Syndrome” *
Farhad Manjoo, “Fix Your Terrible, Insecure Passwords in Five Minutes” *
Malcolm X, “My First Conk”
Linked Readings: The Pressure to Conform; Chasing Beauty; Overcoming Adversity and Trauma

 

45. Classification Beth Trimmer, “Birth Order” *
Amy Tan, “Mother Tongue”
Martin Luther King, Jr., “Ways of Meeting Oppression” *
Linked Readings:  Overcoming Adversity and Trauma; Stereotypes; Family Ties

 

46. Definition Kevin Willey, “The Optimistic Generation”

Nancy Mairs, “On Being a Cripple”
Juliet Schor, “Age Compression”
Linked Readings: Stereotypes; Overcoming Adversity and Trauma; What We Buy, Who We Are

 

47. Comparison and Contrast Rui Dai, “The Whiff of Memory” *
Dave Barry, “The Ugly Truth about Beauty”
Nicholas Kristof, “Two Men and Two Paths *
Linked Readings: Conceptions of Gender; Chasing Beauty, Feeling Foreign

 

48. Cause and Effect Michael Jernigan, “Living the Dream” *
Brent Staples, “Just Walk on By”
Amy Beck, “Struggling for Perfection”
Linked Readings: Conceptions of Gender; Chasing Beauty; Stereotypes

 

49. Argument Casebook: Assisted Suicide Barbara Huttman, “A Crime of Compassion”
Marc Siegel, “Treating the Pain by Ending a Life”
Jerry Fensterman, “I See Why Others Choose to Die”
Marilyn Golden, “Why Progressives Should Oppose the Legalization of Assisted Suicide”
Herbert Hendin, “The Case against Physician-Assisted Suicide: For the Right to End-of-Life Care”
Write an Essay: What Do You Think?

 

Appendix: Problem Solving in Writing Index Correction Symbols

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    Posted September 16, 2013

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