Really, Really Big Questions About Me and my Body

Really, Really Big Questions About Me and my Body

by Stephen Law, Marc Aspinall
     
 

What am I made of? How do I know I'm real?Will I still be the same person at eighty?

Following up on the success of Really, Really Big Questions, and Really, Really Big Questions About God, Faith, and Religion here comes an entertaining book that explores the important, weird, and sometimes metaphysical questions that children have about themselves. From the

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Overview

What am I made of? How do I know I'm real?Will I still be the same person at eighty?

Following up on the success of Really, Really Big Questions, and Really, Really Big Questions About God, Faith, and Religion here comes an entertaining book that explores the important, weird, and sometimes metaphysical questions that children have about themselves. From the physical—Why do I like chocolate? How does my brain work? —to the philosophical—Is my memory what makes me? Is there life after death? —Really, Really Big Questions About Me and my Body by Stephen Law, illustrated by Marc Aspinall takes on the deeper questions that come with growing self-awareness. Throughout it all, humorous writing, funky art, and fun features like optical illusions, amusing stories, quotes, and mind-teasers keep it light and make this philosophic journey unforgettably interesting.

Editorial Reviews

Kirkus Reviews
In the third of a series of Really, Really Big Question books, Law delves again into philosophy for children. The title might imply that this is going to be yet another anatomy-and-physiology-for-children effort. To a certain extent, it is. Discussing cells and atoms and providing some attention to a few body parts--eyes and brains especially--it meanders about, briefly spotlighting a topic and just as quickly heading off in another direction. While it delves into philosophical questions that have haunted deep thinkers for eons--"How do I know that the world is real?" for example--it also fails to name "the tube into your stomach" or "the different tube into your lungs," with the apparent supposition that these long words might stump readers. In answering "Why do I catch colds?" the author incorrectly reports that the virus is transmitted this way: "You might touch a doorknob that someone with the virus has used and then touch the food you are eating." Actually, stomach acid destroys cold viruses, which spread through the air. Aspinall's quirky, disproportionate people scamper across the brightly colored, sometimes hard-to-read pages, helpfully distracting readers from the watered-down deep thought. This shotgun approach to anatomy and philosophy does justice to neither topic; better works are abundant. A really, really big and more pertinent question is: Who is the audience for this unnecessary effort? (Nonfiction. 9-12)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780753468920
Publisher:
Kingfisher
Publication date:
10/02/2012
Series:
Really Really Big Questions Series
Pages:
64
Product dimensions:
9.10(w) x 10.30(h) x 0.60(d)
Age Range:
9 - 12 Years

Meet the Author

Dr. Stephen Law has written numerous academic papers as well as books for both adults and children including the hugely popular The Philosophy Files.

Marc Aspinoll bridges the gap between Japanese culture, graffiti, and mid century animation; creating super fun, stylish and memorable work

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