Rearing Wolves to Our Own Destruction: Slavery in Richmond Virginia, 1782-1865 / Edition 1

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Charlottesville, Virginia, U.S.A. 2002 Paperback New 081392099x. FLAWLESS COPY, PRISTINE, NEVER OPENED--Richmond was not only the capital of Virginia and of the Confederacy, it ... was also one of the most industrialized cities south of the Mason-Dixon Line. Boasting ironworks, tobacco-processing plants, and flour mills, the city by 1860 drew half of its male workforce from the local slave population. "Rearing Wolves to Our Own Destruction" examines this unusual urban labor system from 1782 until the end of the Civil War. Richmond's urban slave system offered blacks a level of economic and emotional support not usually available to plantation slaves. "Rearing Wolves to Our Own Destruction" offers a valuable portrait of urban slavery in an individual city that raises questions about the adaptability of slavery as an institution to an urban setting and, more importantly, the ways in which slaves were able to turn urban working conditions to their own advantage. * TABLE OF CONTENTS: List of Illustrations * List o Read more Show Less

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Overview

RICHMOND WAS NOT only the capital of Virginia and of the Confederacy; it was also one of the most industrialized cities south of the Mason-Dixon Line. Boasting ironworks, tobacco processing plants, and flour mills, the city by 1860 drew half of its male workforce from the local slave population. Rearing Wolves to Our Own Destruction examines this unusual urban labor system from 1782 until the end of the Civil War. Many urban bondsmen and women were hired to businesses rather than working directly for their owners. As a result, they frequently had the opportunity to negotiate their own contracts, to live alone, and to keep a portion of their wages in cash. Working conditions in industrial Richmond enabled African-American men and women to build a community organized around family networks, black churches, segregated neighborhoods, secret societies, and aid organizations. Through these institutions, Takagi demonstrates, slaves were able to educate themselves and to develop their political awareness. They also came to expect a degree of control over their labor and lives. Richmond's urban slave system offered blacks a level of economic and emotional support not usually available to plantation slaves. Rearing Wolves to Our Own Destruction offers a valuable portrait of urban slavery in an individual city that raises questions about the adaptability of slavery as an institution to an urban setting and, more importantly, the ways in which slaves were able to turn urban working conditions to their own advantage.

University of Virginia Press

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Editorial Reviews

Charles B. Dew

This book is an impressive piece of work. Based on solid research, it makes an important contribution to the history of Richmond, to our understanding of urban and industrial slavery, and to the broader field of slave historiography.

Michael P. Johnson

A thoughtful exploration of the promises and pitfalls of urban residence and factory labor for enslaved Virginians in Richmond, and for their enslavers, between independence from the British and the defeat of the Confederacy.

Choice

An outstanding addition to the literature of placing slaves at the center of slave history.

Choice

An outstanding addition to the literature of placing slaves at the center of slave history.

Choice
An outstanding addition to the literature of placing slaves at the center of slave history.
Booknews
Takagi (history, Fairhaven College, Western Washington U.) examines nearly a century of the development of the institution of slavery in an urban setting. She argues that slavery was an integral part of the industrialization and urbanization of parts of the south, but that both processes contributed to a weakened bond between owner and slave that could have ended urban slavery without the intervention of the Civil War. In addition to an emphasis on the development of the slave community, she focuses on the efforts of white Richmond to police and monitor slave activities. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780813920993
  • Publisher: University of Virginia Press
  • Publication date: 12/28/2001
  • Series: Carter G. Woodson Institute Series
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 200
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 0.60 (d)

Meet the Author

Midori Takagi is Assistant Professor of History at Fairhaven College, Western Washington University.

University of Virginia Press

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Table of Contents

List of Illustrations
List of Tables
Acknowledgments
Introduction 1
1 Inauspicious Beginnings 9
2 The Road to Industrialization and the Rise of Urban Slavery, 1800-1840 16
3 Behind the Urban "Big House" 37
4 Maturation of the Urban industrial Slave System, 1840-1860 71
5 Formation of an Independent Slave Community 96
6 The War Years, 1861-1865 124
Epilogue 145
Notes 149
Bibliography 168
Index 180
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