Reba

Reba

5.0 2
by Madison C. Scott
     
 

If your family is with you, you don't need the approval of friends; and if your family is big enough, you don't even need friends! Or you don't if you're Reba Chester. No one else approves of her or the things she does. "A lady," they claim, "does not rope cattle, does not ride bareback. A lady does not know how to handle a gun, and most certainly has never killed

Overview

If your family is with you, you don't need the approval of friends; and if your family is big enough, you don't even need friends! Or you don't if you're Reba Chester. No one else approves of her or the things she does. "A lady," they claim, "does not rope cattle, does not ride bareback. A lady does not know how to handle a gun, and most certainly has never killed a man! A lady does not go visit her sister and deliver her baby nephew before leaving. A lady would never ride in a horse race and she wouldn't refuse a proposal from the aristocratic but deceitful young Bruce Lawton!" But Reba does all of these things and more. No one but her family approves of her. That doesn't bother Reba. She's a new kind of lady, and the people of Bramble Ford would do well to realize it!

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781604747980
Publisher:
Publish America
Publication date:
03/03/2008
Pages:
178
Product dimensions:
5.50(w) x 8.50(h) x 0.41(d)

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Reba 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
AnnBKeller More than 1 year ago
Reba Chester grew up a little differently than the other girls in Bramble Ford. She didn't gossip, wasn't concerned about the latest fashions and vastly preferred leaping a horse over a fence than being squired about town on the arm of some beau. Reba loved her mother and father, but adored her nine brothers and sisters. To Reba, her family was everything - that is, until Vic Shaw rode up to the ranch. Vic, the Marshall's son, was very much like one of Reba's brothers. She liked him. Vic was tall, handsome and he seemed to understand her, something Reba's other suitors had never attempted to do. To them, she was a fellow competitor, a prize to be won, but Vic treasured Reba for who and what she was. When Reba's horse threw her, Vic came back for her, while the other riders raced for the finish line. As affection slowly grew into love, Reba finally realized that she could keep her family and still follow her heart. Ms. Scott's characterizations were superb. I really enjoyed the verbal exchanges between the man-hungry Missy, Reba and her brothers, the sage advice of the elder Chesters and Shaws, the effervescent Meg, Russ, and Vic, the man who slowly became a part of the Chester family and light of Reba's heart. Six stars to this wonderful new writer. I'm looking forward to reading more of Ms. Scott's work in the future.
Eris_L More than 1 year ago
¿Reba¿, by Madison C. Scott, tells the story of young cowgirl Reba Chester, a spirited tomboy growing up in a large family. The title character is the daughter every parent wishes for-- simultaneously obedient to her parents, loyal to her siblings, and indifferent to the opinions of anyone else. She spends her days doing hard work on the family ranch, and her free time reading books.

Though Reba is an undoubtedly idealized character, she is brought somewhat down to earth by her dislike of the vile Missy Theodore, a boy-obsessed girl who fancies herself Reba's friend. Despite her feelings about Missy, Reba still tries to treat her with respect. Reba's brothers and sisters provide diplomatic assistance by helping distract Missy and keeping Reba busy whenever Missy comes around. This practical example of how to handle an unwanted guest is one of the many lessons kids can take away from ¿Reba¿.

Dodging Missy Theodore is not the only challenge to confront Reba and the other Chesters. One of the high points in the book is a confrontation with dangerous cattle rustlers. Reba also endures constant nagging about when and to whom she will be married, which keeps the reader wondering if she will be able to find a man worthy of her.

The life of Reba Chester is far different than that of the average modern-day girl, but that difference is what gives the book much of its charm. Girls who dream of owning horse will enjoy identifying with Reba, who is an accomplished equestrian. The idea of a life free from peer pressure and preteen social politics provides a nice escape for girls who are inundated by messages about the importance of fashion and fitting in.

Light and well-written, ¿Reba¿ is an enjoyable book for preteens and young adults. Girls age 10-13 will probably enjoy reading it themselves, while younger children could have it read to them. There is no foul language or objectionable content, other than perhaps a mention of an incident where Reba is forced to kill a man while defending the ranch. The incident is treated as something Reba regrets, and nothing in the book could be viewed as condoning or encouraging violence.

While ¿Reba¿ does contain a few explicit references to religious values, they never feel forced or ¿preachy¿. Parents, religious or otherwise, can feel good about reading this book with their children or buying it for them to read. The values ¿Reba¿ emphasizes are those that any parent would want to teach.

¿Reba¿ is not a book that attempts to present kids with relatable challenges or show them how to deal with modern-day problems. Instead, it is a book that seeks to take the reader away from her own life and into the world of the Chester ranch, a Western Utopia where a young woman can grow up without fretting about cliques and rumors or obsessing over boys. Parents who want their daughters to be uplifted as well as entertained should buy them a copy of ¿Reba.¿