Rebecca Clarke: Viola Sonata; Dumka; Chinese Puzzle; Passacaglia on an Old English Tune

Rebecca Clarke: Viola Sonata; Dumka; Chinese Puzzle; Passacaglia on an Old English Tune

by Philip Dukes
     
 

The restriction of this disc to the viola music of fairly obscure British-American composer Rebecca Clarke may seem to come from the realm of arcana, but in fact, Clarke seems to have had a predilection for the viola. The 10 works recorded here represent about one-eighth of her total output, and the disc can serve as an introduction to a fascinating story. Clarke may… See more details below

Overview

The restriction of this disc to the viola music of fairly obscure British-American composer Rebecca Clarke may seem to come from the realm of arcana, but in fact, Clarke seems to have had a predilection for the viola. The 10 works recorded here represent about one-eighth of her total output, and the disc can serve as an introduction to a fascinating story. Clarke may have gravitated toward the viola because the "Sonata for viola and piano" that opens the program was her most successful work, taking second prize at a 1919 competition only because patroness Elizabeth Sprague Coolidge broke a tie and proclaimed Ernest Bloch the winner. Clarke was a composer with ears open to much of the diverse music that surrounded her, but she certainly suffered because of her gender. Some claimed, as Clarke recalled in an interview cited in the informative booklet, that she, a woman, couldn't have written the sonata, that Bloch must have written it in order to enter the contest with two different works. Clarke, a student of Charles Stanford, composed only intermittently, but she showed an unusual ability to imprint her own personality on music of various kinds. The short works on the album may be the most compelling, as a distinct lyricism shines through pastoral works (the "Lullaby on an Ancient Irish Tune," track 5, as well as other pieces), concise non-Western-influenced modernism (the little "Chinese Puzzle"), and an almost neo-Classic work (the "Prelude, Allegro, and Pastorale"). The "Sonata for viola and piano" is a Brahmsian late Romantic work, and the "Dumka," track 11, harks back to Dvorák, but neither one sounds derivative, and violist Philip Dukes, collaborating most of the time with pianist Sophia Rahman, gives the music the generally passionate performance it deserves. Sample the hypnotic "Morpheus" (track 7), which Clarke wrote under the pen name of Anthony Trent and accordingly saw it receive a better reception than works published under her own name, for an example of music that is obviously conversant with the works of many twentieth century composers but owes its soul to none of them.

Read More

Product Details

Release Date:
01/30/2007
Label:
Naxos
UPC:
0747313293421
catalogNumber:
8557934
Rank:
223122

Tracks

  1. Sonata for viola & piano  - Rebecca Clarke  - Philip Dukes  - Sophia Rahman
  2. Passacaglia on an Old English Tune, for viola/cello & piano  - Rebecca Clarke  - Philip Dukes  - Sophia Rahman
  3. Lullaby for viola & piano (1909)  - Rebecca Clarke  - Philip Dukes  - Sophia Rahman
  4. Lullaby (An arrangement of an ancient Irish tune), for violin/viola & piano  - Rebecca Clarke  - Philip Dukes  - Sophia Rahman
  5. Morpheus, for viola & piano  - Rebecca Clarke  - Philip Dukes  - Sophia Rahman
  6. Chinese puzzle, for violin & piano  - Rebecca Clarke  - Philip Dukes  - Sophia Rahman
  7. I'll bid my heart be still (after an Old Scottish Border Melody), for viola & piano  - Rebecca Clarke  - Philip Dukes  - Sophia Rahman
  8. Untitled Piece for viola and piano (1917-1918)  - Rebecca Clarke  - Philip Dukes  - Sophia Rahman
  9. Dumka for violin, viola & piano  - Rebecca Clarke  - Philip Dukes  - Sophia Rahman  - Daniel Hope
  10. Prelude, Allegro and Pastorale for viola & clarinet  - Rebecca Clarke  - Philip Dukes  - Robert Plane

Read More

Album Credits

Read More

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >