Rebeca [NOOK Book]

Overview

El duelo y la desgracia enturbian el regreso de los aqueos tras la caída de Troya. Agamenón muere a manos de Egisto y Clitemnestra. Áyax es víctima de la ira de Poseidón. Ulises emprende su interminable periplo. Y Diomedes, traicionado por su esposa, en quien adivina la venganza de Afrodita, abandona Argos con sus hombres en busca de una nueva patria. Los dioses no olvidan las ofensas... Y ni la conquista de la paz y de un nuevo reino impedirá que la tragedia se cierna sobre el ...
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Rebeca

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Overview

El duelo y la desgracia enturbian el regreso de los aqueos tras la caída de Troya. Agamenón muere a manos de Egisto y Clitemnestra. Áyax es víctima de la ira de Poseidón. Ulises emprende su interminable periplo. Y Diomedes, traicionado por su esposa, en quien adivina la venganza de Afrodita, abandona Argos con sus hombres en busca de una nueva patria. Los dioses no olvidan las ofensas... Y ni la conquista de la paz y de un nuevo reino impedirá que la tragedia se cierna sobre el último héroe homérico.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9788490624340
  • Publisher: Penguin Random House Grupo Editorial España
  • Publication date: 7/3/2014
  • Language: Spanish
  • Sold by: RANDOM HOUSE MONDADORI
  • Format: eBook
  • Sales rank: 43,783
  • File size: 561 KB

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 342 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(235)

4 Star

(66)

3 Star

(20)

2 Star

(16)

1 Star

(5)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 342 Customer Reviews
  • Posted February 17, 2009

    Rebecca

    When I first began reading Rebecca, I felt that it wasn't catching my attention, and know that I am a reader of much romance and suspense. But once I jumped into the 2nd or 3rd chapter, things began to really roll in my mind. The imagery was truly fantastic, though a few words may seem unfamiliar to a reader who isn't used to highly sophisticated speech, yet most words can be solved using context clues. This story may definitely capture your heart with its deep suspense and loving sincerity. You just never know what's going on is Mr. de Winter's mind, regardless of his honest actions or words. It also makes you wonder whether the heroine really holds Maxim's heart. Daphne Du Maurier really knew how to hold the reader's attention, and I highly suggest this book if you're a reader who enjoys romance, suspense, and books that are hard to put down.

    14 out of 14 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted September 14, 2009

    AN ABSOLUTELY FANTASTIC READ! MY ALL TIME FAVORITE BOOK!

    I am a reader, always have been. I read everything from classical literature to cozy mysteries. To me "REBECCA" will always be my favorite book because it is so beautifully written. The characters are so well developed, we can see them in the mind's eye. There are so many, never anticipated, twists and turns that captivate your imagination and keep you guessing. It has an element of "Jane Eyre" and a bit of "Withering Heights" but with an added dimension of Alfred Hitchcock. Only Hitchcock could have directed the movie, which I also recommend.
    Enjoy! You will love it, I always have!

    12 out of 12 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 22, 2011

    Highly recommended

    This is one of those books that you should have read years ago. If you didn't, try it, it's a page turner. If you read it years ago, try it again, there are many facets to this book, you will notice things you didn't the first time. I felt it was very worth the time.

    8 out of 8 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted July 19, 2009

    I Also Recommend:

    What a suspenseful read

    I just finished reading "Rebecca" and I'm still shaking my head at how it ended. Wow! I bought this book because I had just read the book "The Forgotten Garden" by Kate Morton and she mentioned that du Maurier was one of her favorite authors. So I thought I'd read something by her and "Rebecca" looked pretty interesting so I bought it. I have to say that the story had me from the first sentence and I was hooked the whole way through. I loved it because it was full of mystery and suspense, it kept me on the edge of my seat the entire time. I think they should do a remake of this movie because it would be amazing. I think the film was originally done back in the 1940s so it would be so good if it were done now. I'll definitely have to read more by du Maurier because I love her writing style.

    8 out of 8 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted September 10, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    best of classics

    Takes you over. A definite, can't put it down, mysterious drama. Very fun read!

    6 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 15, 2007

    A 20th century Jane Eyre

    Rebecca is one of the greatest novels of 20th century. It is said that Daphne Du Maurier took her inspiration for this novel from Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte and the similarities are evident. The narrator is un-named except to be called 'The second Mrs. DeWinter.' This woman marries a mysterious man named Maxim DeWinter and he brings her to live at his house Manderley. Mrs. DeWinter lives in a constant and suffocating shadow of her predocessor, the beautiful, incomparable Rebecca. Rebecca's presence remains in the house by the efforts of the creepy housekeeper, Mrs. Danvers and the shady Jack Favell. The marriage between Mrs. DeWinter and Maxim slowly unravels to reveal a shocking secret. If you love gothic literature, you must read Rebecca. It's a classic.

    5 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted January 4, 2013

    My favorite book of all time. I read it during my sophmore year

    My favorite book of all time. I read it during my sophmore year in High School in Modern Lititure. It has been my constant companion, I have read it so many times over the years I could not count. This is my Perfect book, I love the begining, middle and of course the end!

    4 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 5, 2009

    Rebecca By Daphne DuMaurier

    Quite different than from the movie, directed by Alfred Hitchcock. Still,a great read! More detailed. I recommend the book first, then the movie.

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted January 13, 2012

    GREAT BOOK

    I bought this book because 1. I want to read more and 2. one of my favorite bands wrote a song about it. "Rebecca" by Meg and Dia. When I finally picked it up and saw that it's a "romantic suspense" I was kind of put off. I was imagining cheesy romance novels that old ladies read. (I know I should've known because of the song, but by the time I actually bought the book, I forgot all about the connection) It was slow at first but I've heard from a friend that the book was "haunting" so I pressed forward, excited and curious as to what was so "haunting" about it. I finished the book in 5 days (from a new reader, that's pretty amazing) and I would have to say that I would most likely re-read this book. Although, I was not as "haunting" as they say, it was still a great novel. Really well written, incredibly detailed. I am excited to read more of her books and hope they have the same effect on me as Rebecca did. Also hope the movies don't ruin it for me either.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted October 24, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    Gothic Class - HIGHLY RECOMMEND

    I always put off reading this story because I thought it was a romance. Granted (the cover here is much more indicative of the spookiness quality), I based this solely off the book cover that has the red all over it, so imagine my delight as I got older and heard that it was instead, decidedly Gothic and creepy.

    The entire story is told through a flashback of events that occurred when the unnamed narrator is a hired companion for Mrs. Van Hopper, a gossipy brute of a woman. While traveling through Monte Carlo, they meet Maxim de Winter, whose story is one that Mrs. Van Hopper willingly offers up. Maxim's recent loss of his first wife Rebecca is a sad fate, and as the young narrator spends more time with him, they decide within only a few weeks that they will get married and move to his estate, entitled Manderley.

    But upon arriving to Maxim's estate, it becomes quite a different experience than she anticipated. The mansion is huge, with a full staff to keep up the house and grounds, and the ever-present ghost of the beautiful, social, and popular Rebecca is behind everything that is desirable about Manderley, and even the parties she's hosted are still talked about. But not only is she a part of Manderley's past, she is very much a part of a creepy and sinister presence about the house. Rebecca is everywhere that the new bride finds herself in - from the beautiful landscape of the grounds, the cove where Rebecca lost her life, the little cottage down by the sea that she used to rest in after she would go sailing. Rebecca is everywhere, and the new Mrs. De Winter, meek, quiet, and shy, cannot keep up. Even the housekeeper, Mrs. Danvers is cold and intimidating, harboring secrets that make the new bride fearful. She knows she is being compared by the housekeeper, the visitors to the house on their social calls, and she can't quite help feeling like even Maxim is doing the same, ultimately wondering if he is contemplating if he made the right choice to marry her.

    I loved this story. I've read Du Maurier's short stories last year and enjoyed them, but this struck me much more than anything else and was much, much creepier. It is beautiful and dark and perfect for autumn. I absolutely recommend this story

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted June 13, 2010

    I Also Recommend:

    Wonderful Classic

    The first part of the book started off a little slow. I wasn't really sure why everyone had raved about this classic.......however, after a little bit, I was taken in and could not put the book down. Luckily it was a Sunday and I finished the book by early evening. I absolutely loved it. A wonderful love story and terrific mystery. Fabulous writing. Don't miss it!

    3 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted May 6, 2010

    My first time with this classic

    I purchased the book not realizing it was a work of classic fiction. By the time I finished, I could understand why. Du Maurier's Rebecca was intriguing - a page turner I couldn't put down. It was intellectual and riveting. I thought the story was going to go a certain way, and then Du Maurier traveled down a path I hadn't even thought of.

    A truly great read and a solid addition to any library!

    3 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 13, 2009

    rebecca

    Rebecca is one of the books that catched my attention as soon as I read the back cover. This book, is a stunning, dramatic, and an awesome novel. One of the books I would defenetly recommend, to people who are into drama, and suspense.
    Rebecca is about a poor girl who meets a rich, and handsome man, but the man has a dark past, a past that no one knows about. His past includs his death wife, Rebecca, a beautiful women. After a few days together, the rich men marrys the poor girl, and they are headed to his beautiful mansion, Manderly. Where the dark past is uncovered, and a dramatic ending occurs. To find out the truth about Rebecca, Manderly, and the death that roams the living, you must read this book!!!

    3 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted May 9, 2012

    Rebecca is a novel of great suspense that is being told

    Rebecca is a novel of great suspense that is being told by a nameless narrator whose life has been forever changed by events that happened in the past.
    Author Daphne du Maurier has a brilliant way of developing his characters. The author takes each character from an aspect of happiness to a point of despair. The characters in the beginning of the story develop a strong bond and then start drifting apart due to lies and suspicions. Maurier created characters that were filled with innocence to characters filled with dysfunction and psychotic behaviors.
    The descriptive settings of the book makes it as if you were in the story. Each description of where each event takes place makes you feel as if you were there in the room with the characters. One could get the feel of tension in the room when things begin to get intense. As the main characters walk into their mansion, Manderley, you feel as if you were walking in with them.
    Daphne du Maurier story line takes you from romance to dark suspense and mystery. Some might place this book in a category of gothic writing. The story line carries you through the book so smoothly and yet leaves you with a feeling of suspense wondering what will happen next. She makes it so that just when you thought you knew what had happened, a new twist is thrown in and you are in disbelief at the end.
    In conclusion Daphne du Maurier’s Rebecca, is a story of romance and suspense all in one. It will keep you holding your breath till the end.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted September 28, 2011

    Highly Recommended!

    I for one can say that I actually quite thoroughly enjoyed my reading of the novel Rebecca by Daphne du Maurier. I would definitely recommend it to any of my friends, teacher, colleagues, neighbors and family. It is one of those kinds of books that you really just do not want to put down whatsoever! I sat in my bed at night reading it as much as I could before I went to bed and would even take it out on the patio to read with me while I lay in the sun. I finished it quite quickly though, that's the one thing I do not like about those kind of books that you simply must keep reading; you find yourself finishing it in a matter of days, perhaps even hours if you find yourself that dedicated to it. Enough about my opinion though of course you want to know what the book is about! Basically, in a nutshell, it's a twisted murder mystery and romance rolled all into one, although you don't really find out the murder mystery part until the middle or so, maybe even a little bit past that, into the book. It starts out as a poor girl in the south of France at the Monte Carlo acting as a companion to a snobby, obnoxious woman who thinks that everyone loves her and wants to talk to her and she is so high class, but in reality she is just a loud old woman who laughs a tad too loud at her own jokes and makes others feel quite uneasy in her presence on multiple occasions. The protagonist, her companion, sees this in her and feels bad for the poor old woman, but also doesn't feel sympathy just for the lack of companionship, ironically, that she shows back to the protagonist. Their stay in the Monte Carlo leads to the protagonist and another main character's rendezvous. Leave it to the snobby old woman to attract attention to them and of course get them noticed by someone who really is not looking to notice anyone and wants to be left alone in solitary. She meets Maxim De Winter, who has, even though no one blatantly says it, is obviously on an escape trip from Manderley where his seemingly beautiful, amazing wife Rebecca was killed in a sailing accident. He flees from the memories and the dim, stygian air of England to some fresh coastal air and they are brought together over lunch while the old woman is sick upstairs in her room. While the old woman is sick they go about on drives and have lunches and get to know each other over the next few weeks. Max enjoys her company and the protagonist falls in love with him, practically head over heels. He is mysterious and distant, but that only draws her in more. The thing that I believe drew him to her is companionship and someone to waste away the time with and not be so lonely and always thinking about Rebecca. So he proposes to her and she must tell her companion that she cannot leave with her to New York because she is going to go to Manderley with Mr. De Winter to be married and live with him instead. They are happily, and quietly married right there in France with no large ceremonious gathering of family and friends, considering she has none and he would rather not be around his due to the circumstances. They return home and are welcomed by the whole house staff, this welcoming is organized by the one and only Mrs. Danvers, who is the housemaid of the house. Mrs. Danvers is not welcoming at all, as she is Rebecca's old maid who practically raised her and was strangely infatuated with her, quite possibly even in love with her. Mrs. Danvers resents this newcomer and tries to make her experience there a

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted September 4, 2009

    I Also Recommend:

    Not as spooky as you think

    I never read Rebecca before, but decided to try it after I saw that the book The Thirteenth Tale by Diane Setterfield was compared to it. I very much enjoyed The Thirteenth Tale, but (after reading Rebecca) not sure why the two were compared. The similarities are fairly superficial. Rebecca is not the compelling, chilling gothic tale now that it probably was when it was published in the early 20th century. Readers today (and myself in particular) are now quite familiar with the idea of the psychopath and the wanton destruction and chaos that comes with a character like that. Mrs. Danvers, while obviously not right in the head, was also a disappointment. She's not nearly as creepy and nasty as literary lore makes her out to be. I found the book to be well-written, but not especially compelling until the last 1/3 of the book when Mrs. de Winter the Second wears the ill-chosen white dress to the costume ball. My biggest problem with the book was an extreme dislike of all the characters except Jasper the dog. Mrs. de Winter the Second (who I began to think of as the Idiot Wife because the author never reveals her first name)is a timid, neurotic, annoying mess. I got extremely impatient with her and her imagined conversations (she constantly imagines people saying negative things about her). She's also quite dumb and never really picks up on obvious things she should have, such as Mrs. Danvers suggesting she wear the white dress. I never like her, even at the end of the novel because she always shows herself to be weak, foolish, and not very brave or very bright. Overall I enjoyed the novel, but found most events in the novel predictable and not very shocking or scary. I'm afraid du Maurier's great masterpiece Rebecca did not age well or retain its greatness.

    2 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted August 3, 2012

    A classic. What's not to love?

    A classic. What's not to love?

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted June 8, 2012

    My favorite book.

    My favorite book.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted August 1, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    MY FAVORITE BOOK

    What can I say about Daphne du Maurier`s phenomenal masterpiece? I can tell you that it is one of the best books I have ever read and I have read it repeatedly since. From the first sentence you`re hooked, what is Manderley? Who is this narrator? What happened in this house that so propels the reader forward? Through the lyrical, detailed writing of du Maurier we find out. Our narrator does not tell us her name, but is called throughout the story as the second Mrs. de Winter. And Manderley is the home of her new husband, the ever troubled Maxim de Winter, all but a stranger to her. But the second Mrs. de Winter is young and naive, and the household of Manderley was, and still is, used to obeying Rebecca, the first Mrs. de Winter, the beautiful, graceful Rebecca, dead but not truly forgotten. And as the second Mrs. de Winter stays longer at Manderley she begins a quest for the true fate of the dazzling, elegant Rebecca, and the secrets of the people of Manderley.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 13, 2009

    Rebecca

    It is a good book but i suggest you buy the newer version of Rebecca because since the language is a bit difficult in this book the foggy letters in this version of the book make it ten times harder to read...

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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