Rebel Private: Front and Rear--Memoirs of a Confederate Soldier

Rebel Private: Front and Rear--Memoirs of a Confederate Soldier

4.5 2
by William A. Fletcher
     
 

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"Rebel Private," William A. Fletcher's account of service in all the major theaters of the Civil War, is one of the most compelling books written about service in the War Between the States. William Fletcher's recollection of life as a Confederate soldier are vivid, and his so great is his ability to command the imagination and give the reader a real you-are-there

Overview

"Rebel Private," William A. Fletcher's account of service in all the major theaters of the Civil War, is one of the most compelling books written about service in the War Between the States. William Fletcher's recollection of life as a Confederate soldier are vivid, and his so great is his ability to command the imagination and give the reader a real you-are-there experience. Fletcher was a very practical soldier, and "Rebel Private" reflects this, exposing readers to the everyday concerns of a Confederate soldier, from the plight of the wounded to taking food from women and children in Union territory and scavenging the dying. William Fletcher even expresses regret that he had refrained from shooting an enemy soldier because he appeared very young and he wonders if it hurt his nation's cause. "Rebel Private" also contains exciting stories about being captured and escaping from a moving prison train. After the war, he heard a North Carolina soldier ask Fletcher's Texas cavalry unit if they had any bacon. When one answered yes, the man said "Grease and slide back into the Union." After thinking about it a while, Fletcher saw the wisdom in that advice and did just that. He became a very successful lumber entrepreneur as well as the author of "Rebel Private," which is highly recommend for students of military or Southern history or anyone who likes true adventure.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781453604748
Publisher:
CreateSpace Publishing
Publication date:
05/31/2010
Edition description:
New Edition
Pages:
130
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.28(d)

Meet the Author

William Fletcher isn't different from other soldiers be it outstanding or horrible, but he is the average Confederate soldier from Texas involved in many conflicts. When it comes to soldiering, he is brave and daring but not afraid to admit being scared as he is very honest in his chosen words. The best part of this book isn't the fighting as much as it is the daily life. For the person looking to gain further knowledge, Fletcher writes about his experiences firsthand. Coming up from Texas Fletcher is involved in the Seven Days Battle, 2nd Manassas, Fredericksburg, Gettysburg and Chickamauga campaigns. It was interesting to read about fighting in the 5th Texas, Company F and the thoughts that ran through Fletcher's mind at Gettysburg. The uncertainty, the horrors and the patriotism all wrapped into one was very rewarding to read about. His escape from Union hands was inspiring as he did what he could do to get back to Texas.

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Rebel Private: Front and Rear: Memoirs of a Confederate Soldier 4.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
brf1948 More than 1 year ago
This memoir is of a Civil War Private, a Texas/Louisiana boy who served with the 5th Texas Infantry, Company "F". Written 40 years after the war, it was originally published in 1908 in Beaumont, Texas. That said, this is an insightful look into that war through the eyes of a young man with an optimistic attitude and no expectations. It is what it is, and he records it all. Your understanding and knowledge of the Civil War is not complete until you have read this book. It is one I will keep, and read again.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Reading this account of a common enlisted man's experience in the Confederate Army should show the reader some of the real reasons the Civil War was fought. Bill Fletcher was young, impressionable, and did not own slaves. His father warned him that the people stirring up the war effort were up to no good, but it took a few years and many hardships for Bill Fletcher to appreciate his father's wisdom. Very notable was Fletcher's disdain of rank within the army. He is said to have refused most of the promotions offered to him, because he saw the responsibility they imposed as roadblocks his own personal liberty. Also notable is that the mechanics of the writing within the book improve as the story progresses. This indicates that the man who wrote it had little experience with much writing until he decided to tell this particular story. This is not a tale of a polished writer, nor of an officer who considers himself a military genius. It is an honest account of a man who served his country, as many millions have before and since, although few have written such an honest account.