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Rebound!: Basketball, Busing, Larry Bird, and the Rebirth of Boston [NOOK Book]

Overview

In the mid-1970s, the city of Boston entered a period of upheaval on both its historic cobblestone streets and its legendary parquet basketball court. The Boston Celtics’ long dominance of the NBA came to an abrupt end, and the city's image as a hub of social justice was shaken to its core. When the federal courts declared, in 1974, that the city was in violation of school desegregation rulings and would need to institute a busing program, Boston became deeply polarized.

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Rebound!: Basketball, Busing, Larry Bird, and the Rebirth of Boston

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Overview

In the mid-1970s, the city of Boston entered a period of upheaval on both its historic cobblestone streets and its legendary parquet basketball court. The Boston Celtics’ long dominance of the NBA came to an abrupt end, and the city's image as a hub of social justice was shaken to its core. When the federal courts declared, in 1974, that the city was in violation of school desegregation rulings and would need to institute a busing program, Boston became deeply polarized.

          Then, just as the city was struggling to pull itself out of economic and social turmoil, the Boston Celtics drafted a forward from Indiana State named Larry Bird. Upon the arrival of the “Hick from French Lick” to Boston in 1979, the fates of team and city were reborn. Pride, championships, reduced crime, and an economic boom re-emerged in Boston.

          In Rebound!, author Michael Connelly chronicles these parallel but intertwining worlds. It is an account of a city in financial, moral, and social decline brought back to life by the re-emergence of the Boston Celtics dynasty and the return of hope, purpose, and pride to “Hub of the Universe.” Interviews with city officials, former players, and others on the frontlines provide a fascinating exploration into this tumultuous time.

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Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble
This exceptional book juxtaposes two Boston crises: one on the basketball court, the other, far more serious. In the mid-1970s, the judicially ordered busing of students to achieve integration in Boston's public schools lit a powder keg of racial hatred; physical attacks, vehement protests, and boycotts dominated the news. Meanwhile, Bean Town's legendary Celtics were suffering, too. The retirement of Hall of Fame player and coach Bill Russell in 1969 extinguished a dynasty that had won 11 National Basketball Association championships. Suddenly, it seemed as if the place revered as "the City on a Hill" and "the Hub of the Universe" was relegated to mockery and deep divisions. Gradually, the city healed its political wounds, and the advent of a new Celtics superstar, Larry Bird, seemed to symbolize not only the revival of the team's championship ways but also the resurgence of a great American city.
Booklist
Bill Russell was the key player on Boston Celtics teams that won 11 championships in 13 years in the 1950's and 1960's. Yet Russell never felt comfortable in Boston, a notoriously segregated and often overtly racist city. In 1974, five years after Russell's retirement, the city was forced to embark on a bitterly contested program of bussed integration. It was a city divided. And the Celtics fell on hard times. Then Larry Bird, a white forward from southern Indiana, arrived. Black and white Beantown citizens found common ground in their admiration for Bird's excellence and, Connelly argues, began to heal. There are two books here: one is a brief history of the pain caused by the desegregation ruling; the other, more interesting one is a history of the post-Russell Celtics. Connelly, a native Bostonian, lived through the racial turmoil and was a devoted Celtics fan. Worth reading, both as an account of urban political turmoil and as a basketball history.
The Bulletin
At its heart, Connelly's book is often a love letter to the city and praise for how it - like the Celtics team it loves - has proved resilient over the years.
From the Publisher
The book seamlessly ties these two themes - busing and basketball - together, with each subject trading chapters back and forth with the other. The reader is taken on a trip through the history of the city and its basketball team from its birth right up to its “rebirth” - the Larry Bird-led 1981 championship Celtics. Well written and well researched, Rebound will be an entertaining read for anyone, whether they are a New Englander or not.
collegehoopsnet.com, April 8, 2009

There are two books here: one is a brief history of the pain caused by the desegregation ruling; the other, more interesting one is a history of the post-Russell Celtics. Connelly, a native Bostonian, lived through the racial turmoil and was a devoted Celtics fan. Worth reading, both as an account of urban political turmoil and as a basketball history.
Booklist, December 1, 2008

At its heart, Connelly’s book is often a love letter to the city and praise for how it — like the Celtics team it loves — has proved resilent over the years.
The Bulletin, December 18, 2008

“Bill Russell was the key player on Boston Celtics teams that won 11 championships in 13 years in the 1950’s and 1960’s. Yet Russell never felt comfortable in

Boston

, a notoriously segregated and often overtly racist city. In 1974, five years after Russell’s retirement, the city was forced to embark on a bitterly contested program of bussed integration. It was a city divided. And the Celtics fell on hard times. Then Larry Bird, a white forward from southern

Indiana

, arrived. Black and white Beantown citizens found common ground in their admiration for Bird’s excellence and, Connelly argues, began to heal. There are two books here: one is a brief history of the pain caused by the desegregation ruling; the other, more interesting one is a history of the post-Russell Celtics. Connelly, a native Bostonian, lived through the racial turmoil and was a devoted Celtics fan. Worth reading, both as an account of urban political turmoil and as a basketball history.” – Booklist,

December 1, 2008

The Bulletin

(circ.: 30,000) and

www.bulletinnewspapers.com, December 18, 2008

“At its heart, Connelly’s book is often a love letter to the city and praise for how it — like the Celtics team it loves — has proved resilient over the years.”

Booklist,

December 1, 2008 (circ.: 24,000)

“Bill Russell was the key player on Boston Celtics teams that won 11 championships in 13 years in the 1950’s and 1960’s. Yet Russell never felt comfortable in Boston, a notoriously segregated and often overtly racist city. In 1974, five years after Russell’s retirement, the city was forced to embark on a bitterly contested program of bussed integration. It was a city divided. And the Celtics fell on hard times. Then Larry Bird, a white forward from southern Indiana, arrived. Black and white Beantown citizens found common ground in their admiration for Bird’s excellence and, Connelly argues, began to heal. There are two books here: one is a brief history of the pain caused by the desegregation ruling; the other…a history of the post-Russell Celtics. Connelly, a native Bostonian, lived through the racial turmoil and was a devoted Celtics fan. Worth reading, both as an account of urban political turmoil and as a basketball history.”

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781616731472
  • Publisher: Voyageur Press
  • Publication date: 11/10/2010
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • File size: 4 MB

Meet the Author

A lifelong Bostonian, Michael Connelly has lived through the best of times and the worst of times in “the Hub.” As a writer for the Boston Herald and author of the book 26 Miles to Boston, he has chronicled the life and sports world of Boston for many years.
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 5 )
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Sort by: Showing all of 5 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 11, 2013

    Good

    Nice book for people looking up the history of boston

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted December 10, 2008

    I Also Recommend:

    Great book

    That period in Boston was quite complicated and Connelly does a great job of intertwining the two parallel stories. It was a great book and the details are fascinating to read and remember. This is the second book that I read from this author and he has shown that he has the ability to bring great stories together.

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  • Posted November 18, 2008

    This is simply a great book

    A wonderful book that chronicles the racial divide in the City of Boston during the 70's on the back of the desegreagation order from Judge Garrity. Connelly draws paralells of this issue with that of the Celtics and their fall from grace during that same period. The story then culminates in the drafting of Larry Bird and renewed success of the Celtics while the city subsequently comes together. I enjoyed this book from cover to cover

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 8, 2008

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted October 21, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 5 Customer Reviews

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