Recipes for Art and Craft Materials

Overview

With these inventive recipes for making inexpensive materials for art and craft projedts, you can cook up your own paste, paint, ink, clay, and dough with ingredients readily available at a grocery store, a drugstore, or in your own kitchen cupboards. Each of the seventy recipes includes step-by-step instructions, special hints for making projects go more smoothly, and safety tips. An ideal reference book to use both at home and at school.

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Overview

With these inventive recipes for making inexpensive materials for art and craft projedts, you can cook up your own paste, paint, ink, clay, and dough with ingredients readily available at a grocery store, a drugstore, or in your own kitchen cupboards. Each of the seventy recipes includes step-by-step instructions, special hints for making projects go more smoothly, and safety tips. An ideal reference book to use both at home and at school.

Includes instructions for making pastes, modeling compounds, papier-mãachâe, paints, inks, and numerous other materials for art and craft works.

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Editorial Reviews

School Library Journal
Gr 3 Up Anyone who has ever worked with crafts and children will want to add this recipe book to their collection. Con coctions include a variety of pastes and glues, modeling compounds, different types of papier-mache paints, inks, and even flower preservation. All ingredients may be found easily in grocery, drug-or hardware stores; many already will be in the kitchen. ``Helpful hints'' identify where less common items may be found as well as other important considerations. Safety tips are presented in a preface and are repeated at the end of a recipe when a potentially harmful ingredient is used. Other craft books, such as Ann Wise man's Making Things: the Hand Book of Creative Discovery, Book 2 (Little, 1975) and Phyllis Fiarotta's Sticks and Stones and Ice Cream Cones (Workman, , 1973) sometimes include a similar recipe or two, but it's quite handy to have a number of these recipes under one cover. This revi sion of the 1973 edition includes more than 12 new recipes, many of which do have warning notes accompanying them, mak ing this edition more appropriate for adult use or adult supervised activities with young children. For young children, the best book is still Chernoff's Clay Dough, Play Dough (Walker, 1974; o.p.). Maria B. Salvadore, District of Columbia Public Library
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780688131999
  • Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
  • Publication date: 4/25/1994
  • Edition description: 1st Beech Tree ed
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 144
  • Age range: 8 - 12 Years
  • Product dimensions: 5.25 (w) x 7.62 (h) x 0.28 (d)

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Using This Book

There is fun and adventure in this book. With it, you can learn how to make your own materials for art projects. The most often used and asked for art and craft recipes are here. The book will save classroom teachers and leaders of troops, campers, clubs, and church and temple groups much money and effort because so many different recipes are compiled under one cover. When children learn to mix and make their own materials, many avenues of creative expression open up to them. Busy parents will find many useful rainy-day projects to both occupy and entertain children.

Most of the materials used in these recipes are inexpensive and are found in the home. A few items must be purchased in crafts stores or in pharmacies. In either case, the finished media will be less expensive than ready-made products. They will certainly be more rewarding.

The first thing you should do is read the Helpful Hints section and look through the entire book to become acquainted with the recipes. In many cases you will find several recipes for the same thing, such as paste, finger paint, and modeling compound. Some of these recipes are simple, some are more complicated. Each produces a medium with a unique texture or consistency. You will have fun experimenting with different recipes to determine which you prefer.

Most of the recipes are designed and measured for individual projects. Some recipes include instructions for increasing them for group work. Teachers, parents, and group leaders should determine which recipes are best suited for their particular needs.

Althoughan effort has been made to avoid the use of harmful ingredients, it is recommended that, when using these recipes, children be supervised to prevent accidents. It is also recommended that no one eat or taste any of the finished products. They are not for human consumption.

Helpful Hints

  1. There are many preservatives for pastes, finger paints, and modeling compounds. You can use powdered alum, oil of cloves, oil of cinnamon, lemon extract or an antiseptic, such as Listerine or Bactine. In most cases only one or two of these preservatives are listed in the recipe, but you can substitute any from the above list. The preservatives suggested in this book arc those most frequently found in the home, at a pharmacy, or in the health-aids section of a grocery store. These substances should not be eaten.

  2. For the most part, coloring materials have been limited to poster paints, powdered pigments, dyes, food coloring, and zinc oxide because they are readily available and inexpensive. Zinc oxide powder is a paint pigment that is often used in antiseptic lotions. It can be purchased in a pharmacy.

  3. Unless another kind of flour is specifically called for, always use plain non-self-rising wheat flour in all recipes calling for flour.

  4. For successful results, all measurements should be followed carefully. Since ingredients may vary somewhat from brand to brand, you may have to experiment until you have found the correct quantities for a particular recipe.

  5. Never pour leftover plaster or plaster mix down the drain. It will clog drainpipes.

  6. A plastic coffee-can lid or similar plastic lid is a good base on which to make bowls or figures with modeling compounds. A lid can be easily turned so that you can work on all parts of the object, and you can easily carry it to another place for drying.

  7. You may wish to purchase a palette pan for mixing paints.

  8. Dextrine, which is used in some of these recipes, is easily obtainable in most groceries or drugstores. It is a powdered or granulated sugar substitute that usually contains saccharin, but this will not affect the recipe.

  9. In several recipes, commercial white household glue -- a casein glue-is suggested for expedience. When other glues can be substituted,they are mentioned.

  10. All of the other ingredients used in this book can be purchased in a grocery store or drugstore except rosin, resin glue, plaster of Paris, and the chemicals needed for making colorful flames, pinecones, and fireplace logs; these items can be purchased at a lumberyard or hardware store.
Recipes for Art and Craft Materials. Copyright © by Helen Sattler. Reprinted by permission of HarperCollins Publishers, Inc. All rights reserved. Available now wherever books are sold.
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