Recipes for Continuous Database Integration: Evolutionary Database Development (Digital Short Cut) [NOOK Book]

Overview

This is the eBook version of the printed book.

The past few years have seen the rise of agile or evolutionary methods in software development. These methods embrace change in requirements even late in the project. The ability to change software is because of certain practices that are followed within teams, such as Test Driven Development, Pair Programming, and Continuous Integration. Continuous Integration provides a way for software teams to integrate their work more than once...

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Recipes for Continuous Database Integration: Evolutionary Database Development (Digital Short Cut)

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Overview

This is the eBook version of the printed book.

The past few years have seen the rise of agile or evolutionary methods in software development. These methods embrace change in requirements even late in the project. The ability to change software is because of certain practices that are followed within teams, such as Test Driven Development, Pair Programming, and Continuous Integration. Continuous Integration provides a way for software teams to integrate their work more than once a day, and promotes confidence in the software that is being developed by the team. It is thought that this practice is difficult to apply when continuously integrating the database with application code; hence, Evolutionary Database Development is considered a mismatch with agile methods. Pramod Sadalage shows that this is not necessarily true.

Continuous Integration changed the way software is written. Why not extend and make the database part of the same Continuous Integration cycle so that you can see integrated results of your application as well as your database? Delivered in PDF format for quick and easy access, Recipes for Continuous Database Integration shows how the database can be brought under the preview of Continuous Integration, allowing all teams to integrate not only their application code, but also their database.

This Short Cut presents a recipe for each task that needs to be done. Each recipe starts with a statement of a problem, followed by an explanation and solution. It provides concrete ways and examples to implement ideas in Refactoring Databases: Evolutionary Database Design by Scott W Ambler and Pramod Sadalage.

Table of Contents

What This Short Cut Covers

Introduction

Recipe 1 Continuously Integrating?

Recipe 2 Extracting Your Database in Scripts

Recipe 3 Using Version Control for Your Database

Recipe 4 Automating Database or Schema Creation

Recipe 5 Creating Objects in Your Database

Recipe 6 Removing Database Objects

Recipe 7 Removing Your Database

Recipe 8 Using the Build Property Files

Recipe 9 Re-Creating Your Application Database for Any Build

Recipe 10 Making It Easy for New Developers to Join the Team

Recipe 11 Integrating on Every Check-In

Recipe 12 Naming Upgrade Scripts

Recipe 13 Automating Database Change Script Creation

Recipe 14 Implementing Database Version Checking

Recipe 15 Sending Upgrades to Customers

Sample Code

Further Reading

About the Author

What’s in the Companion Book

Related Publication

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780132703116
  • Publisher: Pearson Education
  • Publication date: 4/9/2003
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 56
  • Sales rank: 1,149,464
  • File size: 2 MB

Meet the Author

Pramod Sadalage is a consultant for ThoughtWorks, an enterprise application development and integration company. He is coauthor of Refactoring Databases: Evolutionary Database Design with Scott Ambler and Evolutionary Database Design with Martin Fowler. He first pioneered the practices and processes of evolutionary database design and database refactoring in 1999 while working on a large J2EE application using the Extreme Programming (XP) methodology. To make it easy for everyone to use evolutionary design in databases, Pramod writes and speaks about database administration on evolutionary projects, the adoption of evolutionary processes with regard to databases, and evolutionary practices impact upon database administration. When he is not working, you can find him spending time with his wife Rupali and daughter Arula, and trying to improve his running.

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Table of Contents

What This Short Cut Covers

Introduction

Recipe 1 Continuously Integrating?

Recipe 2 Extracting Your Database in Scripts

Recipe 3 Using Version Control for Your Database

Recipe 4 Automating Database or Schema Creation

Recipe 5 Creating Objects in Your Database

Recipe 6 Removing Database Objects

Recipe 7 Removing Your Database

Recipe 8 Using the Build Property Files

Recipe 9 Re-Creating Your Application Database for Any Build

Recipe 10 Making It Easy for New Developers to Join the Team

Recipe 11 Integrating on Every Check-In

Recipe 12 Naming Upgrade Scripts

Recipe 13 Automating Database Change Script Creation

Recipe 14 Implementing Database Version Checking

Recipe 15 Sending Upgrades to Customers

Sample Code

Further Reading

About the Author

What’s in the Companion Book

Related Publication

Read More Show Less

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