Reconstructing Gender In Middle East

Overview

Employing a broad, interdisciplinary perspective on gender relations, Reconstructing Gender in the Middle East questions long-standing stereotypes about the traditional subordination of women in the region. With essays on gender construction in Iran, Turkey, Israel, Morocco, Egypt, Lebanon, and the Occupied Territories, this collection offers a wide-ranging exploration of tradition, identity, and power in different parts of the Middle East.

Seeking to overcome monolithic Western...

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Overview

Employing a broad, interdisciplinary perspective on gender relations, Reconstructing Gender in the Middle East questions long-standing stereotypes about the traditional subordination of women in the region. With essays on gender construction in Iran, Turkey, Israel, Morocco, Egypt, Lebanon, and the Occupied Territories, this collection offers a wide-ranging exploration of tradition, identity, and power in different parts of the Middle East.

Seeking to overcome monolithic Western notions of women's life in "the traditional society," the essays in Part I reexamine the assumption that such societies leave little room for female participation.

Part II focuses on the reconstruction of identities by women in Iran, Turkey, Israel, and the Occupied Territories. The authors examine the complex variables that contribute to the development of identities -- including gender, class, and ethnicity -- in various Middle Eastern societies, questioning whether certain identities are more important to women than others. These essays also look at the issue of group identity formation versus the autonomy of the individual.

Part III looks at the relationship between gender and power in everyday life in Lebanon, Israel, Egypt, and Morocco, showing how power relations are constantly contested and renegotiated among family members and members of a community, between nations and between men and women.

WIth its collection of enlightened and diverse contemporary perspectives on women in the Middle East, Reconstructing Gender in the Middle East is an important work that will have significant impact on the way we look at gender in traditional societies.

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Editorial Reviews

Booknews
An interdisciplinary collection of essays on topics including questions of choice and identity surrounding wearing the hijab in contemporary Morocco; neotraditionalism in the poetry of Simin Behbahani; a personal perspective on growing up in Israel; "engendering" the Intifada; and women and politics in Cairo. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780231101233
  • Publisher: Columbia University Press
  • Publication date: 12/15/1994
  • Pages: 246
  • Product dimensions: 0.56 (w) x 6.00 (h) x 9.00 (d)

Table of Contents

About the ContributorsAcknowledgmentsIntroductionReconstructing Gender in the Middle East Through Voice and Experience, by Fatma Muge Gocek and Shiva BalaghiPart One: The Reconstruction of Tradition Gender, Tradition, and History, by Juan R.I. ColeNeotraditionalism in the Poetry of Simin Behbahani, by Farzaneh MilaniWearing the Hijah in Contemporary Morocco: Choice and Identity, by Leila HessiniTurkish Women and the Republican Reconstruction of Tradition, by Zehra F. Arat, by Part Two: The Reconstruction of IdentityGender, Identity, and Anthropology, by Ruth BeharNotes from the Village: On the Ethnographic Construction of Women in Iran, by Erika FriedlWomen's Movement of the 1980s in Turkey: Radical Outcome of Liberal Kemalism?, by Yesim AratGrowing up in Israel: A Personal Perspective, by Rachel PersicoComing of Age in Occupied Palestine: Engendering the Intifada, by Leila HudsonPart Three: The Reconstruction of Power "Metaphors Can Kill":Gender, Power, and the Field of the Literary, by Anne HerrmannArab Women Arab Wars, by Miriam CookeArab Male, Hebrew Female: The Lure of Metaphors, by Anton ShammasWhere Has All the Power Gone? Women and Politics in Popular Quarters of Cairo, by Diane SingermanKeeping It in the Family: Gender and Conflict in Moroccan Arabic Proverbs, by Elizabeth M. BergmanBibliography

Columbia University Press

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