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Recovering History, Constructing Race: The Indian, Black, and White Roots of Mexican Americans [NOOK Book]

Overview

The history of Mexican Americans is a history of the intermingling of races-Indian, White, and Black. This racial history underlies a legacy of racial discrimination against Mexican Americans and their Mexican ancestors that stretches from the Spanish conquest to current battles over ending affirmative action and other assistance programs for ethnic minorities. Asserting the centrality of race in Mexican American history, Martha Menchaca here offers the first interpretive racial history of Mexican Americans, ...
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Recovering History, Constructing Race: The Indian, Black, and White Roots of Mexican Americans

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Overview

The history of Mexican Americans is a history of the intermingling of races-Indian, White, and Black. This racial history underlies a legacy of racial discrimination against Mexican Americans and their Mexican ancestors that stretches from the Spanish conquest to current battles over ending affirmative action and other assistance programs for ethnic minorities. Asserting the centrality of race in Mexican American history, Martha Menchaca here offers the first interpretive racial history of Mexican Americans, focusing on racial foundations and race relations from prehispanic times to the present. Menchaca uses the concept of racialization to describe the process through which Spanish, Mexican, and U.S. authorities constructed racial status hierarchies that marginalized Mexicans of color and restricted their rights of land ownership. She traces this process from the Spanish colonial period and the introduction of slavery through racial laws affecting Mexican Americans into the late twentieth-century. This re-viewing of familiar history through the lens of race recovers Blacks as important historical actors, links Indians and the mission system in the Southwest to the Mexican American present, and reveals the legal and illegal means by which Mexican Americans lost their land grants.
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Editorial Reviews

Library Journal
This volume is an examination of the history of Mexicans in the territory of the present-day United States, emphasizing the role of legal systems in restricting racial groups and establishing a second-class political, economic, and social level for the Mexican American minority population. Using the theoretical framework developed by Michael Omi and Howard Winant in Racial Formation in the United States, Menchaca (anthropology, Univ. of Texas, Austin) suggests that the dominant white populations in colonial Spanish America, independent Mexico, and the United States have used the rule of law to discriminate against those descended from African and Indian populations. One significant contribution of the book is an attempt to examine the mostly forgotten role of Mexicans of African descent in the Mexican American population of the United States. The author's focus on this population is important if overemphasized. This volume will be of interest to academic libraries and public libraries with Latino collections. Mark L. Grover, Brigham Young Univ. Lib., Provo, UT Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.
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Product Details

Table of Contents

Acknowledgments
Introduction 1
1 Racial Foundations 14
2 Racial Formation: Spain's Racial Order 49
3 The Move North: The Gran Chichimeca and New Mexico 67
4 The Spanish Settlement of Texas and Arizona 97
5 The Settlement of California and the Twilight of the Spanish Period 127
6 Liberal Racial Legislation during the Mexican Period, 1821-1848 161
7 Land, Race, and War, 1821-1848 187
8 The Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo and the Racialization of the Mexican Population 215
9 Racial Segregation and Liberal Policies Then and Now 277
Epilogue: Auto/ethnographic Observations of Race and History 297
Notes 311
Bibliography 331
Index 367
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Customer Reviews

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 10, 2003

    Inaccurately descriptive.

    My two cents. By M. J Araujo Philosophy major at the University of California Riverside. Something to keep in mind: Blacks were considered property, and a such they were treated. When the land mass which we know today as 'Mexico' was in a revolutionary stage, slave owners transferred their negro property to the Caribbean, so that they would not lose their investment. This makes perfect logical sense, as opposed to Menchaca¿s view that the Spanish made no attempt to protect their investment which is absurd in itself. Her suggestion is equivalent to a person moving out of their house and leaving all their belongings behind for the new tenant to enjoy. Now does this make sense? We must keep in mind that Spain at the time was one of the strongest Countries in the world and was a leading colonizer. The blacks which reside in Mexico today are immigrant arrivals from the Caribbean which came to Mexico upon their own free will. Now the review: She can¿t distinguish the co-reference of the word `Mexican¿, and often confuses her own thoughts, amounting to frequent absurdities. (1)One concept of the word `Mexican¿ means person born in the country Mexico. In other words a citizen of Mexico. Under this thought of the word `Mexican¿ anyone that is a citizen of Mexico qualifies. Whether they be black,white,asian, etc..(Mexico is a multicultural country) A necessary condition for this thought is the existence of the country known as Mexico( in space and in time) (2) The other concept of the word `Mexican¿ refers to the Mexican Race, people of Spanish and Indigenous heritage.Concept (2) can is present within concept(1). Her hypothesis on being 'Mexican' results in the merging of the two concepts together. The problem with this is that if the country known as Mexico were to disappear, meaning that the government would collapse those people that are immigrants of Mexico and those people that are descendants of people that were immigrants in Mexico, would no longer have the claim to being Mexican, because the country does not exist anymore. The very concept that these people are 'Mexican' relies solely on the condition that Mexico exist physically, that is that, it exist in space and time when the concept is expressed. In contrast, a person that is 'Mexican' in the sense that they have Indigenous and Spanish blood, would continue to be Mexican, even after the country Mexico has collapsed and its government has dispersed . When this happens there will only be one referent which refers to the property of 'being Mexican'.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 30, 2013

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