Recovering the Lost Tools of Learning: An Approach to Distinctively Christian Education

Overview

Public education in America has run into hard times. Even many within the system admit that it is failing. While many factors contribute, Douglas Wilson lays much blame on the idea that education can take place in a moral vacuum. It is not possible for education to be nonreligious, deliberately excluding the basic questions about life. All education builds on the foundation of someone's worldview. Education deals with fundamental questions that require religious answers. Learning to read and write is simply the ...

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Overview

Public education in America has run into hard times. Even many within the system admit that it is failing. While many factors contribute, Douglas Wilson lays much blame on the idea that education can take place in a moral vacuum. It is not possible for education to be nonreligious, deliberately excluding the basic questions about life. All education builds on the foundation of someone's worldview. Education deals with fundamental questions that require religious answers. Learning to read and write is simply the process of acquiring the tools to ask and answer such questions.

A second reason for the failure of public schools, Wilson feels, is modern teaching methods. He argues for a return to a classical education, firm discipline, and the requirement of hard work.

Often educational reforms create new problems that must be solved down the road. This book presents alternatives that have proved workable in experience.

"Good at diagnosing our educational afflictions, Douglas Wilson is still better at finding remedies. His Logos School provides a model, a practical design, for the restoration in the curriculum of Christian humanism--as contrasted with what Christopher Dawson called secular humanism." --Russell Kirk, D. Litt., editor, The University Bookman

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Product Details

Meet the Author

Douglas Wilson, a popular speaker and author, helped to found Logos School in Moscow, Idaho. A fellow of Philosophy and Classical Languages at New St. Andrews College, he has an M.A. in philosophy and a B. A. in classical studies.

Marvin Olasky (PhD, American Culture, University of Michigan) is the editor-in-chief of World Magazine. He has been interviewed numerous times by the national media as the developer of the concepts of compassionate conservatism and biblically objective journalism and is the author of twenty books.

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Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 22, 2007

    A reviewer

    Douglas Wilson's book, 'Recovering the Lost Tools of Learning,' takes a hard look at what has caused our failing educational system and provides remedies that have proven workable and successful. He offers a a step by step response to the educational break down, by discussing the nature of the curriculum and the efforts of Logos School to follow the pattern set down by Dorothy Sayers in her essay, 'The Lost Tools of Learning.' This is a must read for any teacher who is concerned about the dumbing down of education and the decline of a thinking public.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 21, 2009

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