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Recycling
     

Recycling

3.5 2
by Rebecca Stefoff
 

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780791015735
Publisher:
Facts on File, Incorporated
Publication date:
01/01/1991
Series:
Earth at Risk Series
Pages:
128
Product dimensions:
6.44(w) x 9.31(h) x 0.63(d)
Age Range:
10 - 12 Years

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Recycling 3.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Colleen May 1/5/15 Ap Environmental Science The book I read was called “Recycling” by Rebecca Stafoff. This book was written to be very informational. It has the bad and the good of recycling throughout the book,which makes the book more interesting. As we know the world has been falling apart with the economy being bad. The bad economy has to do with recycling, and well other sources. The book really gets into detail about how Americans and other countries pretty much are living in a mess. It mentioned in the book that there is a huge group of people in some places, who live in the dumps, where all the waste gets placed when the trash guy comes around every day. The pile gets so big, and full of products that could have been reused. After taking about that the author talks about how there is step by step processes on what it takes to recycle. It doesn’t just talk about what happens to recycled material, which is very important. But speaking about that, when the waste is not taken care of properly or when there is too much, landfill leaks occur and release toxins into local waterways causing pollution. That ends up leading to more damage later on the worse it gets. The book also states that it is getting worse each and everyday. Americans have the worst reputation with recycling and we are causing a domino effect to other countries. The author gets more into depth with everything, but they are trying to give the readers an inside look on what would happen to America if the recycling industry failed. Honestly this book doesn’t really get the readers attention in the beginning but later on reading it gets better, because after reading what the world is like and how it is falling apart it like a reality check. It was an okay book, I wish it had more pictures to show what everything looked like. Her wording was really easy to understand but to put it in more perspective that most everyone can relate to .This book offers a variety of plans for the recycling industry later in life, and what we as people can do to change the world. The author captured the troubles people face every day by pollution and how one simple bottle can change the world, or how we remove our waste and where we trash it. The lake should not be our junkyards. It is time to make a change, and stand up and fight for our world to get better. There is a saying “reduce, reuse, and recycle”. All i have left to say to that is act upon it and stop holding back.I would definitely recommend this book to someone. It really can change your mind set on the world and what you do with your trash. I give this book a 4 out of 5.
Guest More than 1 year ago
The book Recycling by Rebecca Stefoff is a very informative chapter book on the pros and cons of recycling. Not only does this book educate an everyday citizen on what happens to recycled materials, but it also allows you to read a step by step process on what it takes to recycle. This particular book not only talks about what happens to recyclables but it allows readers to learn about current issues in not only America but various other countries involving recycling. This chapter book gives readers an inside look on what would happen to America if the recycling industry failed. Not only does this book offer all of the above but it gives parents an appealing way for kids to recycle at a younger age. Another tip this book has to offer is how 'virgin' materials cause more pollution than recycled materials in our everyday society. This book holds all the recent studies on the pros to recycling and what it¿s doing to affect our everyday life. Lastly, this book offers a wide variety of future plans for the recycling industry and what we as everyday people can do to change the world around us. In my mind this author captured the troubles people face every day by the pollution and how one simple bottle can fix the world as we know it. Not only was her wording easy to understand but it put things in a perspective that most everyone can relate to. I would definitely recommend this book to someone is search for more ways to improve his/her town. Also anyone in search to know 'behind the scenes' at a recycling plant would gain valuable information from this book. I give this book a 3.5 out of 5.