Red Dirt Road

Red Dirt Road

5.0 1
by Brooks & Dunn
     
 

View All Available Formats & Editions

The sinewy, Stonesy guitar licks firing up Red Dirt Road's opening sizzler, "You Can't Take the Honky Tonk Out of the Girl," serve notice that Brooks & Dunn are feeling their roots in a profound way. The acclaimed duo's contemporary take on honky-tonk embraces traditional grooves fueled by rock 'n' roll guitar, honkin' saxes, burbling B3 organs, whooping femaleSee more details below

Overview

The sinewy, Stonesy guitar licks firing up Red Dirt Road's opening sizzler, "You Can't Take the Honky Tonk Out of the Girl," serve notice that Brooks & Dunn are feeling their roots in a profound way. The acclaimed duo's contemporary take on honky-tonk embraces traditional grooves fueled by rock 'n' roll guitar, honkin' saxes, burbling B3 organs, whooping female choruses, and powerhouse percussion -- it's a heady brew. Ronnie Dunn's nasally twang has rarely packed so much passion and power as it does here, even to the point of hitting some soul-piercing falsetto notes on the bluesy southern rocker, "Caroline." At the other end of the spectrum, Dunn delivers a stirring, deeply soulful reading of the blues-tinged ballad of love and commitment, "That's What She Gets for Loving Me," a languid affair given a dreamy soundscape courtesy dobro, harmonica, organ, and acoustic guitar strums. Blue-eyed soul meets gospel on Dunn's midtempo love testimonial, "Believer," and Kix Brooks shows off his own gritty vocal prowess on a hard-rocking, Springsteen-like reminiscence of flaming youth, "When We Were Kings." With B&D claiming writing credits on a dozen of the 15 tracks here, Red Dirt Road feels like their most personal album to date: It rocks hard and digs its heels into tough-minded country, but also manages to feel honest and deep in its sensitive moments. The duo's fans will eat this up, and those who aren't on board yet are likely to head down the Red Dirt Road real quick.

Read More

Editorial Reviews

All Music Guide - Stephen Thomas Erlewine
Emboldened by the positive reaction to 2001's Steers and Stripes, where the venerated veteran country duo stretched their musical chops, Brooks & Dunn followed with a record that pushed even further and garnered greater musical achievement. Released in the summer of 2003, Red Dirt Road is a bit of a concept album, with Brooks & Dunn sketching out a nostalgic trip through their past and a tribute to their roots and upbringing. This isn't just conveyed by the lyrics, which contain offhanded references to '70s icons, including Born to Run; the music touches on a bunch of the duo's formative influences, whether it's the Keith Richards homage that kicks off the album opener, "You Can't Take the Honky Tonk Out of the Girl," or the Stax horns that punctuate "Believer." Instead of sounding bound to tradition, Brooks & Dunn sound as musically invigorated as they did on Steers and Stripes, demonstrating nuance and muscle in equal measures; after all, they not only do modern country-rock better than their peers, they can pull off a dobro-driven honky tonk song like "My Baby's Everything I Love" with equal aplomb, and then dive into wry satire with the uncredited gospel satire "Holy War" that closes the album. It's not just the amalgam of styles that impresses, but it's the writing, which is as wide-ranging as the performances and just as convincing. Plus, the loose concept gives the album structure and focus, and this, added to the fine songwriting, means that Red Dirt Road is not just one of Brooks & Dunn's most ambitious records, it's also one of their best.
Rolling Stone - James Hunter
For Brooks and Dunn, traditional country is just a starting place, where you dig deep, then fly high.
Entertainment Weekly - Alanna Nash
For Red Dirt Road, [Brooks & Dunn have] dug even deeper, using autobiography, the musical influences of their teens, and energized roots-rock production. (A-)
Billboard - Ray Waddell
In a career marked by success, this fearless duo serves up its coolest record yet.

Read More

Product Details

Release Date:
07/15/2003
Label:
Arista
UPC:
0078636707020
catalogNumber:
67070

Tracks

Read More

Album Credits

Performance Credits

Brooks & Dunn   Primary Artist
Jerry Douglas   Dobro
John Jorgenson   Electric Guitar
Eric Darken   Percussion
John Wesley Ryles   Background Vocals
Bekka Bramlett   Background Vocals
Pat Buchanan   Electric Guitar
Mark Casstevens   Acoustic Guitar
Jeff Coffin   Horn
J.T. Corenflos   Electric Guitar
Dan Dugmore   Acoustic Guitar,Dobro,Steel Guitar
Ronnie Dunn   Tambourine
Shannon Forrest   Drums
Paul Franklin   Steel Guitar
Kenny Greenberg   Acoustic Guitar,Electric Guitar
Vicki Hampton   Background Vocals
Jim Hoke   Harmonica,Accordion
Jim Horn   Horn
Clayton Ivey   Piano
Sam Levine   Horn
Brent Mason   Electric Guitar
Steve Nathan   Organ,Piano,Keyboards,Hammond Organ,Mellotron,Wurlitzer
Steve Patrick   Horn
Michael Rhodes   Bass
Harry Stinson   Background Vocals
Crystal Taliefero   Background Vocals
Dan Tyminski   Background Vocals
Glenn Worf   Bass
Mark Wright   Tambourine,Background Vocals
Reese Wynans   Hammond Organ
Aubrey Haynie   Fiddle
Bill Kenner   Mandola
James Lowry   Acoustic Guitar
Russell Terrell   Background Vocals
Lou Toomey   Electric Guitar
Bryan Sutton   Acoustic Guitar,Banjo,Mandolin,Slide Guitar
Wes Hightower   Background Vocals
Perry Coleman   Background Vocals
Robert Bailey   Background Vocals
Christopher Willis   Background Vocals
Charlie Crowe   Electric Guitar
Dennis Wilson   Background Vocals

Technical Credits

Nile Rodgers   Composer
Kix Brooks   Composer,Producer
Don Cook   Composer
Bob DiPiero   Composer
Greg Droman   Engineer
Ronnie Dunn   Composer,Producer
Jim Horn   Horn Arrangements
Bob Ludwig   Mastering
Terry McBride   Composer
Paul Nelson   Composer
Gary Nicholson   Composer
Rafe Van Hoy   Composer
Jimmie Vaughan   Composer
Craig Wiseman   Composer
Mark Wright   Producer
Rollow Welch   Art Direction
Bill Brunt   Art Direction
Jerry Lynn Williams   Composer
Kenny Beard   Composer
Todd Gunnerson   Engineer
Michealle Vanderpool   Groomer
Charlie Crowe   Composer
Astrid Herbold May   Art Direction
Bart Allmand   Composer

Read More

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >