Red Dragon (Hannibal Lecter Series #1)

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Overview

In the realm of psychological suspense, Thomas Harris stands alone. exploring both the nature of human evil and the nerve-racking anatomy of forensic investigation, Harris unleashes a frightening vision of the dark side of our well-lighted world. In this extraordinary tale -- which preceded The Silence of the Lambs and Hannibal, Harris introduced the unforgettable character Dr. Hannibal Lecter. And in it, Will Graham -- the FBI man who hunted Lecter down -- risks his sanity and ...

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1981 Hard cover New in new dust jacket. New...Nice DJ/. Sewn binding. Cloth over boards. 352 p. Audience: General/trade.

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Red Dragon (Hannibal Lecter Series #1)

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Overview

In the realm of psychological suspense, Thomas Harris stands alone. exploring both the nature of human evil and the nerve-racking anatomy of forensic investigation, Harris unleashes a frightening vision of the dark side of our well-lighted world. In this extraordinary tale -- which preceded The Silence of the Lambs and Hannibal, Harris introduced the unforgettable character Dr. Hannibal Lecter. And in it, Will Graham -- the FBI man who hunted Lecter down -- risks his sanity and his life to duel a killer called...

The Red Dragon

A quiet summer night...a neat suburban house...and another happy family is shattered -- the latest victims of a grisly series of hideous sacrificial killings that no one understands, and no one can stop. Nobody lives to tell of the unimaginable carnage. Only the blood-stained walls bear witness.

All hope rests on the Special Agent Will Graham, who must peer inside the killer's tortured soul to understand his rage, to anticipate and prevent his next vicious crime. Desperate for help, Graham finds himself locked in a deadly alliance with the brilliant Dr. Hannibal Lecter -- the infamous mass murderer who Graham put in prison years ago. As the imprisoned Lecter tightens the reins of revenge, Graham's feverish pursuit of the Red Dragon draws him inside the warped mind of a psychopath,, into an unforgettable world of demonic ritual and violence, beyond the limits of human terror.

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Editorial Reviews

Gale Research
Critic Jospeh Amie, writing in theSaturday Review, observed: "The suspense is sustained by deft characterizations, fascinating crime-lab details, and a twisting plot, and understated prose," while Newsweek's Jean Strouse deemed Red Dragon "gruesome, appalling, occasionally formulaic and mechanical," but "guaranteed to terrify and succeed." In the New York Times Book Review Thomas Fleming recommends the book for "those who like their flesh to crawl."
Forbes Magazine
Red Dragon has a frightening, chilling chase that holds you in thrall. The book is loaded with acute characterizations.
From the Publisher
Acclaim for the novels of Thomas Harris:

For Black Sunday:

"Frighteningly believable."—Chicago Tribune

"Suspenseful, nightmarish."—Los Angeles Times

"Breathtaking. All forces converge with an apocalyptic bang!"— New York Times

"Fast-paced, all too realistic... with a shattering climax."—Kirkus Reviews

"A spellbinder... The race to save the Super Bowl is hair-raising, one that will keep you rooted to your chair."—Hartford Courant

For Red Dragon:

"Red Dragon is an engine designed for one purpose—to make the pulse pound, the heart palpitate, the fear glands secrete."—New York Times Book Review

"A gruesome, graphic, gripping thriller... Extraordinarily harrowing."—Plain Dealer, Cleveland

"Want to faint with fright? Want to have your hair stand on end? Want to read an unforgettable thriller with equal parts of horror and suspense? Harris was obviously only warming up with his best seller Black Sunday."—Daily News, New York

"Irresistible... A shattering thriller... Readers should buckle themselves in for a long night's read because from the first pages... Harris grabs hold."—Publishers Weekly

"The scariest book of the season."—Washington Post Book World

"Easily the crime novel of the year."—Newsday

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780399124426
  • Publisher: Penguin Group (USA) Incorporated
  • Publication date: 11/16/1981
  • Series: Hannibal Lecter Series, #1
  • Pages: 352
  • Product dimensions: 20.00 (w) x 20.00 (h) x 20.00 (d)

Meet the Author

A native of Mississippi, Thomas Harris began his writing career covering crime in the United States and Mexico, and was a reporter and editor for the Associated Press in New York City. His first novel, Black Sunday, was published in 1975, followed by Red Dragon in 1981, The Silence of the Lambs in 1988, and Hannibal in 1999.

Biography

Insightful. Cunning. Mysteriously elusive. Wickedly dark. Such descriptions could just as easily apply to novelist Thomas Harris as they could to his most famous creation -- one of the most notorious literary (and cinematic) villains of all time. Hannibal Lecter has left a wake of murder and chaos through a trilogy of horrifically mesmerizing thrillers: Red Dragon, The Silence of the Lambs, and Hannibal. Now, twenty-five years after making his debut, Lecter is back in Harris's fifth novel Hannibal Rising. Biography From within the shadows of a darkened cell lurks a human monster with an intellect as sharp as a straight razor and a conscience as blank as a death shroud. He's Hannibal Lecter, a formerly brilliant psychiatrist turned prisoner after it was discovered that the good doctor had some rather, err... unconventional appetites.

Ever since the release of the film version of The Silence of the Lambs in 1991, Hannibal Lecter has been one of the most famous fictional villains in popular culture, perhaps only rivaled by Dracula and Frankenstein's monster. But what of Lecter's creator? Thomas Harris is quite a bit less accessible than the cannibalistic psychopath he crafted. While Harris is infamously media-shy, it is well known that he was once a crime reporter working for the Waco Tribune-Herald, later becoming a reporter and editor for the Associated Press. Harris would carry his fascination with true crime over to the world of literary fiction when he wrote his debut novel in the mid-70s. Black Sunday, the harrowing, terrifying tale of a terrorist attack plotted to take place during the Super Bowl, was inspired by the real-life assassination of eleven Israeli athletes at the 1972 Munich Olympics. The novel revealed a young author with a gift for building palpable suspense out of a seemingly improbable situation (at least, in 1975 the idea of a mass-scale terrorist attack on U.S. soil was considered to be highly improbable). Two years after the novel's release, it became a major motion picture directed by the late John Frankenheimer (The Manchurian Candidate) and starring Robert Shaw and Bruce Dern. Black Sunday was the first film based on a book by Thomas Harris, but it was by no means the last.

In 1981, Harris finally published his second novel. It was Red Dragon that first introduced the world to Hannibal Lecter as he assists Special Agent William Graham of the FBI in his quest to hunt down a ritualistic killer. Lecter was a villain unlike any other: calm, controlled, insightful, even humorous, but ready to strike like a viper at any given moment. The book became a massive hit, both critically and commercially, paving the way for further adventures featuring the flesh-eating Lecter.

When Hannibal "The Cannibal" returned in a novel that propelled the character into the realm of superstardom, he was once again pitting wits with an FBI agent bent on bringing down a serial killer. However, this time the agent was infinitely more complex, her relationship with Lecter infinitely more provocative. Clarice Starling's battle of wits with Lecter was detailed in The Silence of the Lambs, one of the finest thrillers in print. The critical accolades were astounding: The New York Times, The Washington Post, The San Francisco Examiner, and the Chicago Tribune are just a sampling of the periodicals that praised The Silence of the Lambs. But it was Jonathan Demme's film adaptation of the novel that really sealed Harris's -- and Lecter's -- position in pop culture. With Anthony Hopkins giving a career performance as the doctor, The Silence of the Lambs is widely regarded as one of the greatest horror films in cinema history. In fact, it is the only horror film ever to sweep the Academy Awards, winning trophies for Best Film, Best Director, Best Actor, Best Actress (Jodie Foster as Agent Starling), and Best Screenplay Based on Material Previously Published.

Not surprisingly, expectations were high when Harris published Hannibal in 1999. However, this reunion between Hannibal Lecter and Clarice Starling was deemed too-much-of-a-grisly-thing by many critics who felt that the story had stumbled into the realm of gross self-parody. That didn't stop many from praising the book, though. In his review for the New York Times, fellow horror-master Stephen King said that Harris's fourth novel was "one of the two most frightening popular novels of our time, the other being The Exorcist." Larry King wrote in USA Today that Hannibal was nothing less than "a work of art." Once again, the story found a home on the big screen with Anthony Hopkins returning as Lecter and Julianne Moore taking over the role of Clarice. Much like the book upon which it was based, Hannibal received mixed notices because of its graphic violence despite the fact that the original ending of the book had been softened considerably.

For those hoping that the mixed reaction to Hannibal did not result in an end to Lecter's exploits, Harris's next book should be a bit of gruesome good news. Hannibal Rising is a prequel to the Lecter trilogy, tracking how an abandoned boy in Eastern Europe came to become one of the most diabolical creations in literature. So, settle down with some fava beans and a nice chianti, and hold tight... Hannibal Lecter will be back before you can say, "I'm having an old friend for dinner."

Good To Know

Harris is making his screenwriting debut with an adaptation of his Hannibal Rising. Starring the young French actor Gaspard Ulliel as Hannibal Lecter, the film is slated for release in February 2007.

Harris supposedly declined to be involved in the making of The Silence of the Lambs, but when the film wrapped, he sent each member of the cast and crew a bottle of wine.

Hannibal Lecter made his big screen debut as played by Brian Cox in the 1986 Michael Mann film Manhunter, an adaptation of Red Dragon. Sixteen years later, Brett Ratner remade the film with the novel's original title and Anthony Hopkins resuming his role as Lecter.

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Read an Excerpt

Will Graham sat Crawford down at a picnic table between the house and the ocean and gave him a glass of iced tea.

Jack Crawford looked at the pleasant old house, salt-silvered wood in the clear light. "I should have caught you in Marathon when you got off work," he said. "You don't want to talk about it here."

"I don't want to talk about it anywhere, Jack. You've got to talk about it, so let's have it. Just don't get out any pictures. If you brought pictures, leave them in the briefcase. Molly and Willy will be back soon."

"How much do you know?"

"What was in the Miami Herald and the Times," Graham said. "Two families killed in their houses a month apart. Birmingham and Atlanta. The circumstances were similar."

"Not similar. The same."

"How many confessions so far?"

"Eighty-six when I called in this afternoon," Crawford said. "Cranks. None of them knew details. He smashes the mirrors and uses the pieces. None of them knew that."

"What else did you keep out of the papers?"

"He's blond, right-handed and really strong, wears a size eleven shoe. He can tie a bowline. The prints are all smooth gloves."

"You said that in public."

"He's not too comfortable with locks," Crawford said. "Used a glass cutter and a suction cup to get in the house last time. Oh, and his blood's AB positive."

"Somebody hurt him?"

"Not that we know of. We typed him from semen and saliva. He's a secretor."

Crawford looked out at the flat sea. "Will, I want to ask you something. You saw this in the papers. The second one was all over the TV. Did you ever think about giving me a call?"

"No."

"Whynot?"

"There weren't many details at first on the one in Birmingham. It could have been anything--revenge, a relative."

"But after the second one, you knew what it was."

"Yeah. A psychopath. I didn't call you because I didn't want to. I know who you have already to work on this. You've got the best lab. You'd have Heimlich at Harvard, Bloom at the University of Chicago--"

"And I've got you down here fixing fucking boat motors."

"I don't think I'd be all that useful to you, Jack. I never think about it anymore."

"Really? You caught two. The last two we had, you caught."

"How? By doing the same things you and the rest of them are doing."

"That's not entirely true, Will. It's the way you think."

"I think there's been a lot of bullshit about the way I think."

"You made some jumps you never explained."

"The evidence was there," Graham said.

"Sure. Sure there was. Plenty of it--afterward. Before the collar there was so damn little we couldn't get probable cause to go in."

"You have the people you need, Jack. I don't think I'd be an improvement. I came down here to get away from that."

"I know it. You got hurt last time. Now you look all right."

"I'm all right. It's not getting cut. You've been cut."

"I've been cut, but not like that."

"It's not getting cut. I just decided to stop. I don't think I can explain it."

"If you couldn't look at it anymore, God knows I'd understand that."

"No. You know--having to look. It's always bad, but you get so you can function anyway, as long as they're dead. The hospital, interviews, that's worse. You have to shake it off and keep on thinking. I don't believe I could do it now. I could make myself look, but I'd shut down the thinking."

"These are all dead, Will," Crawford said as kindly as he could.

Jack Crawford heard the rhythm and syntax of his own speech in Graham's voice. He had heard Graham do that before, with other people. Often in intense conversation Graham took on the other person's speech patterns. At first, Crawford had thought he was doing it deliberately, that it was a gimmick to get the back-and-forth rhythm going.

Later Crawford realized that Graham did it involuntarily, that sometimes he tried to stop and couldn't.

Crawford dipped into his jacket pocket with two fingers. He flipped two photographs across the table, face up.

"All dead," he said.

Graham stared at him a moment before picking up the pictures.

They were only snapshots: A woman, followed by three children and a duck, carried picnic items up the bank of a pond. A family stood behind a cake.

After half a minute he put the photographs down again. He pushed them into a stack with his finger and looked far down the beach where the boy hunkered, examining something in the sand. The woman stood watching, hand on her hip, spent waves creaming around her ankles. She leaned inland to swing her wet hair off her shoulders.

Graham, ignoring his guest, watched Molly and the boy for as long as he had looked at the pictures.

Crawford was pleased. He kept the satisfaction out of his face with the same care he had used to choose the site of this conversation. He thought he had Graham. Let it cook.

Three remarkably ugly dogs wandered up and flopped to the ground around the table.

"My God," Crawford said.

"These are probably dogs," Graham explained. "People dump small ones here all the time. I can give away the cute ones. The rest stay around and get to be big ones."

"They're fat enough."

"Molly's a sucker for strays."

"You've got a nice life here, Will. Molly and the boy. How old is he?"

"Eleven."

"Good-looking kid. He's going to be taller than you."

Graham nodded. "His father was. I'm lucky here. I know that."

"I wanted to bring Phyllis down here. Florida. Get a place when I retire, and stop living like a cave fish. She says all her friends are in Arlington."

"I meant to thank her for the books she brought me in the hospital, but I never did. Tell her for me."

"I'll tell her."

Two small bright birds lit on the table, hoping to find jelly. Crawford watched them hop around until they flew away.

"Will, this freak seems to be in phase with the moon. He killed the Jacobis in Birmingham on Saturday night, June 28, full moon. He killed the Leeds family in Atlanta night before last, July 26. That's one day short of a lunar month. So if we're lucky we may have a little over three weeks before he does it again.

"I don't think you want to wait here in the Keys and read about the next one in your Miami Herald. Hell, I'm not the pope, I'm not saying what you ought to do, but I want to ask you, do you respect my judgment, Will?"

"Yes."

"I think we have a better chance to get him fast if you help. Hell, Will, saddle up and help us. Go to Atlanta and Birmingham and look, then come on to Washington. Just TDY."

Graham did not reply.

Crawford waited while five waves lapped the beach. Then he got up and slung his suit coat over his shoulder. "Let's talk after dinner."

"Stay and eat."

Crawford shook his head. "I'll come back later. There'll be messages at the Holiday Inn and I'll be a while on the phone. Tell Molly thanks, though."

Crawford's rented car raised thin dust that settled on the bushes beside the shell road.

Graham returned to the table. He was afraid that this was how he would remember the end of Sugarloaf Key--ice melting in two tea glasses and paper napkins fluttering off the redwood table in the breeze and Molly and Willy far down the beach.



Sunset on Sugarloaf, the herons still and the red sun swelling.

Will Graham and Molly Foster Graham sat on a bleached drift log, their faces orange in the sunset, backs in violet shadow. She picked up his hand.

"Crawford stopped by to see me at the shop before he came out here," she said. "He asked directions to the house. I tried to call you. You really ought to answer the phone once in a while. We saw the car when we got home and went around to the beach."

"What else did he ask you?"

"How you are."

"And you said?"

"I said you're fine and he should leave you the hell alone. What does he want you to do?"

"Look at evidence. I'm a forensic specialist, Molly. You've seen my diploma."

"You mended a crack in the ceiling paper with your diploma, I saw that." She straddled the log to face him. "If you missed your other life, what you used to do, I think you'd talk about it. You never do. You're open and calm and easy now . . . I love that."

"We have a good time, don't we?"

Her single styptic blink told him he should have said something better. Before he could fix it, she went on.

"What you did for Crawford was bad for you. He has a lot of other people--the whole damn government I guess--why can't he leave us alone?"

"Didn't Crawford tell you that? He was my supervisor the two times I left the FBI Academy to go back to the field. Those two cases were the only ones like this he ever had, and Jack's been working a long time. Now he's got a new one. This kind of psychopath is very rare. He knows I've had . . . experience."

"Yes, you have," Molly said. His shirt was unbuttoned and she could see the looping scar across his stomach. It was finger width and raised, and it never tanned. It ran down from his left hipbone and turned up to notch his rib cage on the other side.

Dr. Hannibal Lecter did that with a linoleum knife. It happened a year before Molly met Graham, and it very nearly killed him. Dr. Lecter, known in the tabloids as "Hannibal the Cannibal," was the second psychopath Graham had caught.

When he finally got out of the hospital, Graham resigned from the Federal Bureau of Investigation, left Washington and found a job as a diesel mechanic in the boatyard at Marathon in the Florida Keys. It was a trade he grew up with. He slept in a trailer at the boatyard until Molly and her good ramshackle house on Sugarloaf Key.

Now he straddled the drift log and held both her hands. Her feet burrowed under his.

"All right, Molly. Crawford thinks I have a knack for the monsters. It's like a superstition with him."

"Do you believe it?"

Graham watched three pelicans fly in line across the tidal flats. "Molly, an intelligent psychopath--particularly a sadist--is hard to catch for several reasons. First, there's no traceable motive. So you can't go that way. And most of the time you won't have any help from informants. See, there's a lot more stooling than sleuthing behind most arrests, but in a case like this there won't be any informants. He may not even know that he's doing it. So you have to take whatever evidence you have and extrapolate. You try to reconstruct his thinking. You try to find patterns."

"And follow him and find him," Molly said. "I'm afraid if you go after this maniac, or whatever he is--I'm afraid he'll do you like the last one did. That's it. That's what scares me."

"He'll never see me or know my name, Molly. The police, they'll have to take him down if they can find him, not me. Crawford just wants another point of view."

She watched the red sun spread over the sea. High cirrus glowed above it.

Graham loved the way she turned her head, artessly giving him her less perfect profile. He could see the pulse in her throat, and remembered suddenly and completely the taste of salt on her skin. He swallowed and said, "What the hell can I do?"

"What you've already decided. If you stay here and there's more killing, maybe it would sour this place for you. High Noon and all that crap. If it's that way, you weren't really asking."

"If I were asking, what would you say?"

"Stay here with me. Me. Me. Me. And Willy, I'd drag him in if it would do any good. I'm supposed to dry my eyes and wave my hanky. If things don't go so well, I have the satisfaction that you did the right thing. That'll last about as long as taps. Then I can go home and switch one side of the blanket on."

"I'd be at the back of the pack."

"Never in your life. I'm selfish, huh?"

"I don't care."

"Neither do I. It's keen and sweet here. All the things that happen to you before make you know it. Value it, I mean."

He nodded.

"Don't want to lose it either way," she said.

"Nope. We won't, either."

Darkness fell quickly and Jupiter appeared, low in the southwest.

They walked back to the house beside the rising gibbous moon. Far out past the tidal flats, bait fish leaped for their lives.



Crawford came back after dinner. He had taken off his coat and tie and rolled up his sleeves for the casual effect. Molly thought Crawford's thick pale forearms were repulsive. To her he looked like a damnably wise ape. She served him coffee under the porch fan and sat with him while Graham and Willy went out to feed the dogs. She said nothing. Moths batted softly at the screens.

"He looks good, Molly," Crawford said. "You both do--skinny and brown."

"Whatever I say, you'll take him anyway, won't you?"

"Yeah. I have to. I have to do it. But I swear to God, Molly, I'll make it as easy on him as I can. He's changed. It's great you got married."

"He's better and better. He doesn't dream so often now. He was really obsessed with the dogs for a while. Now he just takes care of them; he doesn't talk about them all the time. You're his friend, Jack. Why can't you leave him alone?"

"Because it's his bad luck to be the best. Because he doesn't think like other people. Somehow he never got in a rut."

"He thinks you want him to look at evidence."

"I do want him to look at evidence. There's nobody better with evidence. But he has the other thing too. Imagination, projection, whatever. He doesn't like that part of it."

"You wouldn't like it either if you had it. Promise me something, Jack. Promise me you'll see to it he doesn't get too close. I think it would kill him to have to fight."

"He won't have to fight. I can promise you that."

When Graham finished with the dogs, Molly helped him pack.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 259 )
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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 262 Customer Reviews
  • Posted May 14, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    Great read of a chilling tale

    This is the true masterpiece of an author more well-known for a different book. I read "Red Dragon" before reading "Silence of the Lambs" or seeing any of the movies. I could not put it down, and it kept me on the edge of my seat. When I saw the movies, I was disappointed by the way they failed to capture the suspense Thomas Harris creates in the book. The characters are richly developed, and Harris makes it very easy to empathize with the characters. Whether you have seen the movies or not, this is a great read. The writing is masterful, and the characters are richer and more developed than in "Silence of the Lambs." A great book for those looking for a suspenseful read.

    10 out of 10 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 10, 2012

    Was better than the movie

    The thing about this novel was it was by far better than the movie. But the thing is that you should really read the book before watching the movie. When i read the book after seeing the movie i was dissapointed as to how the plot moved a tad slowly and seemed to drag on. It was certainly enthralling though and a great read.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 10, 1999

    Big Underachieving Dragon

    Can you comprehend an ace FBI investigator tracking down a gnarled, serial-killing ogre by analyzing the blood stains left by his victims on their upholstery? Sounds great, doesn't it? Yeah, but only if it could of been expressed a little better. This is the driving plot in the first effort of Thomas Harris's Silence of the Lamb series. FBI investigator Will Graham is called back from retirement to track down an ugly, disfigured beast that is on a rampage in the south, eviscerating entire families. However, Harris seems like he is writing a screenplay for Paramount Pictures. The story payws too much attention to frivilous detail, such as describing the dandruff on the shoulder of a pharmacist that Graham purchases Bufferin from. If you can plow your way through the sludge, be prepared for a cheesy thriller. If Harris could of written this novel like a novel, he would of been declared 'brilliant.' However, now he only lies at a subpar 'sufficient.' Let it be known, you can move on to Silence of the Lambs without much guilt.

    3 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 24, 2013

    Im 13 and a girl and i love this book!

    -lulu river

    2 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 7, 2012

    This is one of many books ib enjoyed over the years

    Slow moving incredable story an so well davelopd with an ending is so good even better then girl with the dragan tatto an you all how much loved that book

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted May 11, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    awesome book by thomas harris

    this is one totally awesome book by thomas harris!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 25, 2000

    Wow!

    Thomas Harris has been one of those pleasant suprises for me. I only read 'Red Dragon' because my wife was busy reading and praising 'Hannibal'and I am not a patient man. The central plot of the book involves two FBI types, Jack Crawford (of 'Silence of the Lambs') and Will Graham ( a retired civilian specialist with a knack for catching serial killers)chasing one Francis Dolarhyde, a bonafide twisted soul who kills families. The narrative prose is elegant, effortless and exciting and presents the case and the chase in a style so smooth and transparent that Harris hardly ever gets in the way of his own writing. I have always liked this ability in a storyteller. But more importantly, Harris has a remarkable gift for writing deeply in and out of the characters' souls while weaving the unfolding arc of the story in a revealing way about their formative histories. It's easy to write about events, but much harder to create psycho-biography which engages and holds the reader. This is Harris' true gift. He begets utterly 'knowable' characters. One is left exhausted and sad at the end, but with a sense of not having been cheated by the effort of reading because we know the killer so well. We even...dare I say it...understand him and why he is such a brutally disfigured personality. That's refreshing. (Did I really say refreshing?) I will look forward to 'Hannibal' and all subsequent Harris works with enthusiasm.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 25, 2014

    Red Dragon

    I have always wanted to read Thomas Harris, but never got around to it until recently. Well, I am a foolish woman. I finished "Red Dragon" in record time. To be honest, it didn't grab me right away; when I started reading I almost put it down a couple of times. But once I got the flow of the narrative and a feel for the author's style I was hooked. I'm in the middle of "Silence of the Lambs" now and mentally smacking myself for waiting so long to get into this series (no pleasure, no rapture greater than discovering a good book, except perhaps knowing an equally good book will follow). If you're like me, indecisive, hemming and hawing over whether or not to begin, just take the plunge.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 29, 2013

    Fantastic!

    Thomas Harris is not a very good author, however, this is one hell of a story! I literally couldn't put it down.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted August 4, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    One of my all time favorites

    It's a shame after two tries that Hollywood can't get a movie right. I used to be a hardcore horror fan...this is the only book that ever gave me nightmares. I highly recommend this one!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 28, 2002

    Red Dragon, Best of the Trilogy

    This is my favorite book. I have read it many times and have seen the new movie 3 times. (Twice on opening day!) But this one was by far the best of the three books. I enjoyed the first look at Hannibal Lector and watching him evolve. The suspense was great! I love this book!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 1, 2002

    Good, but Harris has gotten better...

    I must admit that I¿ve owned this book for a few years and never attempted reading it until I heard the movie was coming out. Once I started, however, it was really hard to put down. Harris has a way of making you almost ¿root¿ for the bad guy (Francis Dolarhyde in this book). Will Graham is a now-retired FBI agent who originally captured Hannibal `the Cannibal¿ Lecter. The FBI requests that he come out of retirement to assist with finding the ¿Tooth Fairy¿ who has killed two separate families on the past two full moons. The imagery is great (I couldn¿t wait to see Dolarhyde¿s tattoo brought to life) ¿ the book has just enough mystery and is just scary and gory enough to know you¿re reading Thomas Harris. And, they even did a pretty fine job with the movie, although it¿s a bit trite at the end. This book was great, but Harris has definitely gotten better as he¿s gone along.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 26, 2002

    It was good

    I had heard great things about The Silence of the Lambs and Hannibal, and being not allowed to see the movies, read the books first. This one was ok. Not very much suspense, it wasn't even scary. The Silence of the Lambs was a much better book. Kind of creepy, one of the few books that I only read in 2 days. Overall, it was ok, not great.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 11, 2001

    Potential for prequel?

    I enjoyed this book. Had me wanting more 'cause I found it so interesting. I could visualize every scene in the book as though I were shooting the movie in my head. In truth a couple chapters probably could have been shortened or left out. We know how Dolarhyde was disfigured so why go into it so much? One chapter on his history would have been enough. The last chapter really got me when The Dragon shows up at Graham's home and attacks him. Never saw it comin'. Clever plot and very interesting dialogue and characterization make this a worthy read. I was a tad disappointed Lecter didn't get much page time but oh well he makes up for it in Silence and Hannibal.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 10, 2001

    Not the best

    Red Dragon was not a good book. I also thought it would be mostly about Hannibal Lecter, which is why I bought it. I like Hannibal's character. It is not focused on him. The story is not interesting, but more like sick. This is not a book for weak stomachs. Red Dragon is not as interesting as I thought it would be. Not at all scary or suspenseful. The thing that scared me the most was the killer's background and The Dragon.

    1 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 2, 2001

    Thomas Harris? Yes....great story? Not really.

    Yes, 'Red Dragon' was a Thomas Harris novel with all the twists and turns that follow in his other books, but truthfully, 'Red Dragon' was a disappointment. It was a page turner because I was waiting for it to get really good.....it didn't. It was beautifully written but there were not really any ups or downs to the story. The best part of the story were the interactions between the cop and Hannibal. The entire manipulation of Hannibal Lector to the cop was intriguing. Perhaps because I read the series backwards...but 'Red Dragon' was just a complete let down from 'Silence' and 'Hannibal'

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 1, 2014

    Ryv

    Yeuvyr .dh bte dfyrr

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 17, 2014

    Astrid

    Is at res 4

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 17, 2014

    Ashtin

    Walks around " dragon or rider?"

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 17, 2014

    Stormfly

    Astrid?

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