Red Knife (Cork O'Connor Series #8)

( 71 )

Overview


The newest book in William Kent Krueger's award-winning Corcoran O'Connor series finds the charismatic private investigator caught in the middle of a racial gang war that's turning picturesque Tamarack County, Minnesota, into a bloody battlefield.

When the daughter of a powerful businessman dies as a result of her meth addiction, her father, strong-willed and brutal Buck Reinhardt, vows revenge. His target ...

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Red Knife (Cork O'Connor Series #8)

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Overview


The newest book in William Kent Krueger's award-winning Corcoran O'Connor series finds the charismatic private investigator caught in the middle of a racial gang war that's turning picturesque Tamarack County, Minnesota, into a bloody battlefield.

When the daughter of a powerful businessman dies as a result of her meth addiction, her father, strong-willed and brutal Buck Reinhardt, vows revenge. His target is the Red Boyz, a gang of Ojibwe youths accused of supplying the girl's fatal drug dose. When the head of the Red Boyz and his wife are murdered in a way that suggests execution, the Ojibwe gang mobilizes, and the citizens of Tamarack County brace themselves for war, white against red.

Both sides look to Cork O'Connor, a man of mixed heritage, to uncover the truth behind the murders. A former sheriff, Cork has lived, fought, and nearly died to keep the small-town streets and his family safe from harm. He knows that violence is never a virtue, but he believes that it's sometimes a necessary response to the evil that men do. Racing to find answers before the bloodshed spreads, Cork himself becomes involved in the darkest of deeds. As the unspeakable unfolds in the remote and beautiful place he calls home, Cork is forced to confront the horrific truth: Violence is a beast that cannot be contained.

In Red Knife, Krueger gives his readers a vivid picture of racial conflict in small-town America, as well as a sensitive look at the secrets we keep from even those closest to us and the destructive nature of all that is left unsaid between fathers and sons, husbands and wives, friends and lovers.

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"If you don't know Cork O'Connor, get to know him now." — Booklist

"Cork O'Connor...is one of those hometown heroes you rarely see...someone so decent and true, he might restore his town's battered faith in the old values." — The New York Times Book Review

"William Kent Krueger is one of the best mystery writers out there. Any reader who has yet to pick up one of his Cork O'Connor suspense novels is in for a rare treat." — Vince Flynn

Marilyn Stasio
Cork O'Connor, a former sheriff whose Indian bloodline gives him tribal access, is one of those hometown heroes you rarely see (and can hardly believe in) anymore—someone so decent and true, he might restore his town's battered faith in the old values.
—The New York Times
Publishers Weekly
Buck Schirner, an actor with a deep, full-bodied voice, narrates Krueger's ninth novel about Minnesota private detective Cork O'Connor with a blunt, no-frills delivery. His voice is a perfect match for a cleanly written, robust adventure featuring an honorable hero of Caucasian-Ojibwe Indian heritage who keeps his human faults and strengths under wraps. As the sleuth is drawn into a series of violent events triggered by the death of a local power broker's meth-addicted daughter-including a brutal double murder, a potential race war, a looming north woods drug infestation and a school takeover by an armed student-Schirner subtly shifts his narration to fit the situation. He softens it a bit for O'Connor's sensitive probing of his suspects, but toughens up when necessary, as in the detective's violent confrontation with a group of drug dealers determined to kill or be killed. An Atria hardcover (Reviews, July 14).
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Library Journal

Although it is spring in Tamarack County, MN, a darkness looms over the townspeople of Aurora and the Ojibwe of the Iron Lake Reservation. Kristi Reinhardt is dead, and the blame falls on Lonnie Thunder, a young Ojibwe man known to deal both drugs and child pornography. Former sheriff Cork O'Connor, now working as a part-time PI, is called to a meeting with Alex Kingbird, leader of the Red Boyz, an Ojibwe gang rumored to be part of the local drug trade. Alex wants to offer Kristi's father justice to avert further violence, and he has called on part-Ojibwe Cork to set up a meeting. But then Alex and his wife are executed outside their home. Krueger's eighth O'Connor installment (after Thunder Bay) involves several mysteries as more violence and deaths occur. Cork tries to find answers while keeping his family safe and doing right by both his former law enforcement colleagues and the Ojibwe people. While this tale of small-town racial tensions and drug trafficking by Native Americans is drawn from the pages of the newspaper, Krueger puts a very human face on these issues. For most mystery collections; recommend to patrons who enjoy atmospheric outdoor mysteries by C.J. Box and Steve Hamilton.
—Eric Norton

Kirkus Reviews
In Minnesota's Tamarack County, it's all about an eye for an eye, for an eye, for an eye. Payback makes the world go round in Cork O'Connor country. The code is inflexible and non-negotiable. So when Buck Reinhardt's daughter is murdered and conventional wisdom pins the killing on Lonnie Thunder, Cork and the rest wait knowingly, a little like spectators in a Roman amphitheater. Never mind that Lonnie has made himself scarce. Since he's alleged to be a member of the Red Boyz-a group of young militants operating out of the local Ojibwe reservation-Alex Kingbird, their charismatic leader, serves as a scapegoat to be slaughtered along with his wife, Rayette, for good measure. It follows that Red Boyz-baiting Buck Reinhardt, who was surely behind the grisly double murder, must in turn become a target. So it goes, with Cork (Thunder Bay, 2007, etc.) drawn ever deeper into the bloody vortex. Not that he appears to mind all that much, for Cork, Tamarack County born and bred, knows what's in the air. Only Cork's wife Jo and a few of the other women find the code out of kilter. But this is Tamarack County, where men rule and the eyes have it. Colorful characters, spot-on sense of place, but the attempts to prettify vigilantism will leave some readers cold. Agent: Danielle Egan-Miller/Browne & Miller Literary Associates
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781416556756
  • Publisher: Atria Books
  • Publication date: 5/12/2009
  • Series: Cork O'Connor Series , #8
  • Edition description: Reprint
  • Pages: 336
  • Sales rank: 105,069
  • Product dimensions: 5.30 (w) x 8.10 (h) x 0.90 (d)

Meet the Author

William Kent Krueger

William Kent Krueger is the New York Times bestselling author of fourteen mysteries in the Cork O’Connor series, including Trickster’s Point and Tamarack County, as well as the novel Ordinary Grace, which won the 2014 Edgar Award for Best Novel. He lives in the Twin Cities with his family. Visit his website at WilliamKentKrueger.com.

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Read an Excerpt

One

The words on the note folded around the check in his wallet read: Here's $500. A retainer. I need your help. See me today. The note and the money were from Alexander Kingbird, although it was signed Kakaik, which was the name of an Ojibwe war chief. It meant Hawk.

Five hundred dollars was a pretty sound enticement, but Cork O'Connor would have gone for nothing, just to satisfy his curiosity. Although the note didn't mention Kingbird's situation, it was easy to read between the lines. In Tamarack County, unless you were stupid or dead you knew that Alexander Kingbird and the Red Boyz were in trouble. How exactly, Cork wondered, did Kingbird think he could help?

Kingbird and his wife, Rayette, lived on the Iron Lake Reservation. Their home was a nice prefab, constructed to look like a log cabin and set back a hundred yards off the road, behind a stand of red pines. A narrow gravel lane cut straight through the trees to the house. As Cork drove up, his headlights swung across a shiny black Silverado parked in front. He knew it belonged to Tom Blessing, Kingbird's second-in-command. It was Blessing who'd delivered the note that afternoon.

And it was Blessing who opened the door when Cork knocked.

"About time," Blessing said.

He wasn't much more than a kid, twenty-one, maybe twenty-two. Long black hair falling freely down his back. Tall, lean, tense. He reminded Cork of a sapling that in the old days might have been used for a rabbit snare: delicately balanced, ready to snap.

"The note said today. It's still today, Tom," Cork said.

"My name's Waubishash."

Each of the Red Boyz, on joining the gang, took the name of an Ojibwe war chief.

"Let him in." The order was delivered from behind Blessing, from inside the house.

Blessing stepped back and Cork walked in.

Alexander Kingbird stood on the far side of his living room. "Thank you for coming."

He was twenty-five, by most standards still a young man, but his eyes weren't young at all. They were as brown as rich earth and, like earth, they were old. He wore his hair in two long braids tied at the end with strips of rawhide, each hung with an owl feather. A white scar ran from the corner of his right eye to the lobe of his ear. Cork had heard it happened in a knife fight while he was a guest of the California penal system.

Kingbird glanced at Blessing. "You can go."

Blessing shook his head. "Until this is over, you shouldn't be alone."

"Are you planning to shoot me, Mr. O'Connor?"

"I hadn't thought of it, but I may be the only guy in this county who hasn't."

Kingbird smiled. "I'll be fine, Waubishash. Go on."

Blessing hesitated. Maybe he was working on an argument; if so, he couldn't quite put it together. He finally nodded, turned, and left. A minute later, Cork heard the Silverado's big engine turn over, followed by the sound of the tires on gravel. Everything got quiet then, except for a baby cooing in a back room and the low, loving murmur of a woman in response.

"Mind taking your shoes off?" Kingbird said. "New carpet and Rayette's kind of particular about keeping it clean."

"No problem." Cork slipped his Salomons off and set them beside a pair of Red Wing boots and a pair of women's Skechers, which were on a mat next to the door.

"Sit down," Kingbird said.

Cork took a comfortable-looking easy chair upholstered in dark green. Kingbird sat on the sofa.

"You know why you're here?" he said to Cork.

"Instead of twenty questions, why don't you just tell me."

"Buck Reinhardt wants me dead."

"You blame him?"

"I'm not responsible for his daughter dying."

"No, but you're hiding the man who is."

"And you know this how?"

"Popular speculation. And he's one of the Red Boyz."

"I want to talk to Reinhardt."

"Why?"

Kingbird sat tall. He wore a green T-shirt, military issue it looked like. On his forearm was a tattoo. A bulldog — the Marine Corps devil dog — with USMC below.

"I have a daughter of my own," he said. His eyes moved a hair to the right, in the direction from which the cooing had come. "I understand how he feels."

"I don't think you do. Your daughter is still alive."

"My daughter will also never use drugs."

"In that, I wish you luck."

"Then give him what he wants. Give him the man responsible for his daughter's death. Give him Lonnie Thunder."

The suggestion seemed to have no effect on Kingbird. "Will you arrange a meeting?"

"Why me?"

"Because you're not just another white man. You've got some Ojibwe blood in your veins. Also, you used to be sheriff around here and I figure that gives you a certain standing. And — " He held up a card, one of the business cards Cork routinely tacked to bulletin boards around Aurora. " — it's how you earn your living."

"How do I know, and how can Buck be sure, that you won't just shoot him as soon as he shows up?"

"Let him name the place and the time. You'll be there to observe and to maintain the peace."

"Five hundred dollars isn't nearly enough to get me to step between blazing guns."

"I'll be unarmed. You make sure Reinhardt is, too. And the five hundred dollars is a retainer. When this meeting is done, you'll have another five hundred."

Rayette Kingbird strolled into the room carrying her child. Misty had been born six months earlier. When Alexander Kingbird looked at his wife and his daughter, his face softened.

Cork stood up. "Evening, Rayette."

"Cork."

"Bedtime for Misty?"

She smiled. She was full-blood Ojibwe. Her life before Kingbird had been hard. Abandoned by her mother and raised by her grandparents she'd been into every kind of trouble imaginable. When Cork was sheriff of Tamarack County, he'd picked her up a few times, juvenile offenses. She'd skipped childhood through no fault of her own and he'd thought that any youth she might have had had been squeezed out long ago. Then she met Kingbird and married him and things changed. She looked young and she looked happy.

"Past bedtime," she said. "She wants a kiss from her daddy."

Rayette held the baby out and Kingbird took his daughter. He nuzzled her neck. She gurgled. He kissed her forehead. She squirmed. "Night, little turtle," he said. He handed her back to his wife.

Rayette left with the child. Kingbird looked after them a moment, then turned to Cork.

"We've named her Misty, but her real name is Tomorrow. Every child's name is Tomorrow. You, me, Buck Reinhardt, we're Yesterday. Kristi Reinhardt shouldn't have died. No child's life should be cut short of tomorrow."

"Nice sentiment, Alex, but what are you going to offer Buck? What do I tell him that will make him agree to meet you?"

He ignored the fact that Cork had used his given name, not the one he'd taken as a member of the Red Boyz. He said, "Tell him he will have justice. Tell him I give my word." Copyright © 2008 by William Kent Krueger

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 71 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(34)

4 Star

(22)

3 Star

(8)

2 Star

(4)

1 Star

(3)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 71 Customer Reviews
  • Posted October 22, 2008

    Wow! Keeps you guessing through out..

    Great story. Sometimes a little more complicated than it needs to be but you can stay with it, and most of the characters, as you turn the pages. Just when you think it's over, it's not! Krueger ties up everything at the end. Sub plots and all. Just the way a good story should end. I am ordering "Thunder Bay".

    5 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 10, 2008

    Another tale from Mr. Krueger always over too soon !

    Cork O'Connor, former sheriff and now a private investigator, shines on the pages as always. Time is well spent with Cork O'Connor. There are the twists and turns, violence but not just for the sake of violence, family first values and the workings of a small town. I try to take my time reading my annual 'Cork' book but end up racing thru the pages. Always a winner !!

    5 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 7, 2008

    Violence, Drawn & Quartered

    So readers know, Mr. Krueger and I are very well-acquainted. This is his eighth entry in a powerful award-winning series about Corcoran O¿Conner, family man, ex-sheriff, sometime private investigator, and an upright and very moral man. O¿Connor¿s life is complicated by his staunch roots in both Native American and Caucasian ethnicity. His life is also complicated by his two daughters, a son, and his feisty, bright and somewhat uptight wife, Jo. Their communication at times seems as obtuse as between strangers from different worlds. There are times in this story when this reader would like to reach out and kick O¿Connor in his well-shaped backside. Krueger has carefully shaped each episode in this long family saga to explore significant and troubling aspects of our modern society. Red Knife is no different. It begins with a significant and violent episode in the life of a young Ojibwa boy. The story then commences to explore in some detail the influences of violence in our society. The genius of this storyteller, aside from his consummate storytelling skills is that he is careful to avoid sweeping polemical statements. The novel examines some of the causes of violence in intimate and personal ways. Then it goes beyond the acts themselves, almost always leaving to reader to sort out her or his own reactions to the violence. Red Knife commences to also explore how violence can affect individuals not directly engaged in the violence itself family members, friends and even enemies, members of the law enforcement community, and those on the periphery. And always there is that layer of intimate struggle for understanding and connection between Jo and Cork O¿Connor. I don¿t wish to suggest this is a heavily violent novel. It is not. It is, rather, a smoothly written, carefully plotted and laid out examination of an intimate group of individuals, some of whom are family members, some not, and their responses to the violence they experience and observe. Krueger has produced a thoughtful, richly textured human novel, one that most readers, I suspect, will remember and think about long after they close the book.

    5 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 7, 2008

    The Cork O¿Connor mysteries are consistently some of the best regional whodunits

    While there is not always harmony in rural Minnesota especially in Tamarack County between the Anglos and the Native Americans who reside on the Ojibwe Reservation, there is respect. Now there is a war coming ever since Alexander Kingbird formed the gang the Red Boyz, who affirm that Anglo law does not apply to them rumors fly they are part of the illegal drug pipeline. Kristi Reinhardt died from a dose of Meth given to her by the Red Boyz whose name is Thunder. Buck Reinhardt want the leader of the Red Boyz gang dead as Kingbird defies the law hiding Thunder on the Rez.------------- Alexander asks part Ojibwe former sheriff and current private detective Cork O¿Connor to arrange a meeting with Buck so that the Red Boyz leader can assure the grieving angry man that justice will be done. He fears that if he takes matters into his own hands, a heated race war will ignite. However, before that can occur Alexander and his wife Rayette are executed almost immediately afterward Buck is killed in a drive by shooting. Tensions have boiled over between the two groups with Cork believing only the hidden Thunder is able to ease the rising conflict before an open war explodes.------------------ The Cork O¿Connor mysteries are consistently some of the best regional whodunits. Cork has switched from law enforcement to private detective work, but though at times he misses his former job not in this case he is thankful that he is no longer a sheriff as he has to go outside the law to insure justice occurs and a deadly war prevented. The story line is told from various viewpoints so the reader obtains a deep understanding of the Ojibwe need for the youth to know and cherish their heritage while many of the Anglo sees that as ironically an internal form of immigration. William Kent Kreuger is at his best with this strong thriller as his hero struggles to stop a lethal range war that will only harm everyone.----------------- Harriet Klausner

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted November 23, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    Violence Creates More Violence.

    "Red Knife", by William Kent Krueger takes place in Minnesota on an Indian Reservation. The Red Boyz are the trouble-makers and the gang on the reservation; they are thought to be responsible for a girl's death, the daughter of Buck Reinhardt, a hard-nosed individual with quite a temper. Cork O'Connor, the main character solves various murder cases that are linked together; the first includes Rayette and Alexander (a.k.a. Alejandro). They are originally thought to be killed by Buck Reinhardt, and this rumor causes more and more violence to erupt throughout and around the reservation.
    Overall, the theme of the book of the book is that violence should not be responded to with more violence. The murder of Rayette and Alexander Kingbird towards the beginning of the book causes more violence throughout the reservation. Many people's lives are taken, and if this moral was followed, most of it would not have happened. Violence alone causes pain and sorrow, and more of it only devastates further.
    This book was very fast-paced, and had a lot of detail, which at times was quite difficult to follow. However, this book was well written and its theme can be applied to life today. This book should be read by everyone, because the acts of violence that take place within it teach everyone a lesson. Violence should not be inflicted unless absolutely necessary, because it causes pain...it causes remorse.

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 7, 2014

    Sitting on the edge of your seat reading experience!

    Each one of the books in this series that I have read, I say to myself, this has got to be the best book William Kent Krueger has written in the Cork O'Connor series. Then I open the next book in the series, in this case "Red Knife", and I can truthfully say, this is the best in the series! Of the books I have read... LOL!) If you haven't read it, you are missing out! It is a story that is so current with some of the things that are happening in the USA today. You just have to read it, that is all!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 13, 2013

    Great service

    Great service

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 13, 2013

    High Recommened

    I highly recommend the Cork O'Connor series. I am on #9 and still not bored with them.

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  • Posted March 30, 2013

    highly recommend

    Love a series of books and these are so great, I read it all night. I was surprised when the sun came up and I was still reading. Couldn't put it down

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 11, 2013

    Another great read

    Krueger did it again

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  • Posted October 12, 2012

    Am Enjoying This Series

    William Kent Krueger tells a great story and the books get better with each addition to the series.

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  • Posted September 29, 2012

    Read Mercy Falls first

    This Cork O'Connor book is a continuation of Mercy Falls. There's a bounty on
    Cork so he escapes to UP Michigan to hideout but he can run but not hide. The
    thugs follow him. All turns out well eventually as he also makes a few other
    things right along the way.

    If you like the predominantly northern Minnesota, small town setting and are interested in
    colorful, genuine, characters, you will love the entire Cork O'Connor series starting with Iron Lake.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 9, 2012

    Red Knife was surprisingly good

    Enjoyed this one.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 1, 2012

    Scavenger hunt2

    Go to Zombie tenth result. See you there.

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 25, 2012

    Highly Recommend

    Fast read and enjoyable.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 27, 2011

    *****

    I have read all O'Connor Series they were wonderful

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 20, 2011

    Great Book

    this was an awesome read

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  • Posted December 3, 2011

    great book

    this book is a great read for anyone wanting to go on an adventure.
    I love all his books.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 28, 2011

    Good until....

    I've enjoyed the Cork O'Connor books. There were moments that I didn't enjoy alnong the way, but overall the stories of the O'Connor family were interesting. This book has a blatant, heavy-handed anti-gun message. And re-hashing the Columbine mass-shooting was bogus.

    If these ideals appeal to you; i.e. Cork regretting saving his friends' lives, the idea that disarming is the only path to peace, etc. this is the book for you! :-P

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted October 28, 2011

    Good Read

    This is the first book by this author I have read and I enjoyed. The characters were developed enough that I really started caring about them. The book nicely dealt with some fairly tough issues. I didn't care for the ending in that 2 plot lines came to a head. The second one was somewhat of a surprise although thinking back the signs of it were there. I don't really like the last chapter it went too far in the future. I thought some of it should be covered in the next book. I have the first book in this series now and do look forward to reading it as well as the others.

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