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Red Knit Cap Girl and the Reading Tree
     

Red Knit Cap Girl and the Reading Tree

4.5 2
by Naoko Stoop
 

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This new adventure with Red Knit Cap Girl and her friends uses simple prose and radiant illustrations to shine a light on the joy of reading and the importance of working together.

One day Red Knit Cap Girl and her friends discover a hollow tree in the middle of the forest. What can be done with one ordinary tree? "I will keep my book in this nook so everyone can

Overview

This new adventure with Red Knit Cap Girl and her friends uses simple prose and radiant illustrations to shine a light on the joy of reading and the importance of working together.

One day Red Knit Cap Girl and her friends discover a hollow tree in the middle of the forest. What can be done with one ordinary tree? "I will keep my book in this nook so everyone can read it," Red Knit Cap Girl says.

But the tree isn't only for books. Little by little, one by one, the animals share their unique gifts and turn the ordinary tree into a special spot for everyone to enjoy!

Editorial Reviews

The New York Times - Maria Russo
This is an especially clever contribution to Stoop's earthy yet sweetly mystical series…because in all three books her unusual illustrations—pops of bright color against soft washes of neutral earth tones—are done with acrylic, ink and pencil on plywood. You can see the grain of the wood emanating through the artwork, and the effect is quite striking. In the way that looking at actual trees can call forth deep-seated human emotion, the books deliver a pleasantly grounded feeling; there is something simultaneously calming and mood-elevating about them. It's as though the pages were themselves part of the natural world, and in Red Knit Cap Girl and the Reading Tree, Stoop uses the actual wood grain to create the texture on her many drawings of trees. Which feels like a slam-dunk decision.
From the Publisher
"Children will delight in pointing out the many little humorous touches, while parents and librarians will take a quiet and glorious pleasure in sharing a story about books and reading. There is nary a beep to be heard or a flashing to be seen in this loving ode to the printed page, reading and sharing stories."—Kirkus"

This combines a bundle of sweet elements-soft, inviting artwork; a simple yet attention holding tale; and a strong message. The adorable Red Knit Cap Girl, with her readily identifiable outfit and her pinpoint eyes, is a charmer."—Booklist

Children's Literature - Heidi Hauser Green
This is a book to really look at. The soft and gentle coloring of the cover, the simple tree branches and blossoms against the rainbow wash of the appealing end pages, the curvy lines of the young protagonist and her woodland friends all deserve notice. The gorgeous art—rendered in acrylic, ink, and pencil—was created on plywood. The media of Stoop’s work gives the book a unique and appealing effort that draws the idea. The story also engages. The girl and her rabbit settle under the tree to play because it is too hot to play. Squirrel comes along, eager to show them something, and so they follow. It’s a hollowed-out tree, a “nook,” and Red Knit Cap Girl has an idea of how they can use it. She puts her book in, and Rabbit does the same. With each turn of the page, other animals contribute what they can—newspapers, a shelf, knitted blankets, and (of course) more books. Over time, the nook is transformed; moon and owl recognize the truth of what it has become and work together on a sign for the space Red Knit Cap Girl created: library. In the final spread, everyone expresses gratitude for the hard work that has led to the creation of this community treasure. Stoop’s work calls to mind the importance of libraries, and also of community. This book seems particularly timely in light of a pair of current trends across the U.S.: cuts in library funding and the development of “little free libraries” (littlefreelibrary.org). Although readers may wonder why she continues to wear her usual yellow scarf and red knit cap when it is “too hot to run and too hot to play,” they are sure to enjoy this addition to the popular “Red Knit Cap Girl” series. Reviewer: Heidi Hauser Green; Ages 4 to 8.
School Library Journal
10/01/2014
PreS-Gr 1—Red Knit Cap Girl and her woodland friends return in an adventure focused on about books. When Squirrel shows Red Knit Cap Girl a tree with a huge nook, she has an idea. "I will keep my book in this nook so everyone can read it.'" Squirrel, White Bunny, Bear, and Hedgehog love the idea so much that they soon add their own books, too. As the idea spreads, more and more animals add to the nook. Beaver wants to participate, but he doesn't have any books, so he gnaws a bookshelf for the contributions. When autumn arrives, so do the sheep with warm wool blankets for the readers. The final touch is when Moon and Owl work through the night to make the perfect sign: "Library." "'A library is a place where anyone can borrow a book,'" the child explains. This last bit is aimed at Sly Fox, who thought he was stealing books. Stoop's straightforward text is a good match for her illustrations. Soft, sweet, and a bit retro, they are done on plywood whose grain shows subtly under the art. Beautiful background washes set the scene for the main characters, who are expressive despite having no mouths and dots for eyes. The pictures, on single page and full spreads, clearly support the text. A story about reading, friendship and working together—what's not to love?—Catherine Callegari, Gay-Kimball Library, Troy, NH
Kirkus Reviews
2014-07-29
A little girl and her forest friends build the perfect, albeit old-fashioned, library. In two previous titles, Red Knit Cap Girl talked to the moon and rescued a lost animal. Here, readers see her as a book lover who establishes a library in a "nook," a hollow in a great tree. With contributions from White Bunny, Squirrel, Hedgehog, Bear and the Birds, its collection of books grows. Beaver has no books, but he builds a shelf. Only Sly Fox lacks the requisite community spirit (he steals a book). The Sheep bring blankets for winter snuggling, while Moon and Owl provide a finishing touch by creating a sign that says "Library." Once again, Stoop's acrylic, pencil and ink artwork on plywood provides appealing textures and delicately nuanced colors for daytime, nighttime and the passing seasons. Children will delight in pointing out the many little humorous touches, while parents and librarians will take a quiet and glorious pleasure in sharing a story about books and reading. There is nary a beep to be heard or a flashing light to be seen in this loving ode to the printed page, reading and sharing stories. All will agree with Red Knit Cap Girl: "It is good to share books." (Picture book. 3-6)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780316228862
Publisher:
Little, Brown Books for Young Readers
Publication date:
09/23/2014
Series:
Red Knit Cap Girl Series , #3
Pages:
40
Sales rank:
306,037
Product dimensions:
9.20(w) x 9.10(h) x 0.50(d)
Age Range:
4 - 8 Years

Meet the Author

Naoko Stoop's love of drawing began when she was a young child growing up in Japan. Naoko now lives and paints in Brooklyn, New York. She uses found materials including plywood and brown paper bags as her canvas. Naoko has shown her work in a variety of galleries and stores in New York and hopes that, through her artwork, she can inspire the child within everyone. Her website is www.redknitcapgirl.com.

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Red Knit Cap Girl and the Reading Tree 4.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
enjoy and cherish alone or share with a child of any age and stage! d
YoungMensanBookParade More than 1 year ago
This is a picture book. It is about a girl who makes a library with all of her friends in the forest. Sly fox tries to take the books, but then she gives them back. I think it can teach you a lesson not to take things without asking. I think it’s a really good book. I think other people would like it, because it’s a really fun and caring book. It’s caring because the girl lets everybody read her book in the forest. My favorite part is when they make the discovery of the Library sign that Owl and Moon made, because when Red Knit Cap Girl and her friends saw it, that was like a lifetime moment. Younger kids and middle age kids like me who are six and who like books would like this story. Review by Aubrey L, Age 6, Greater NY Mensa