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The Red Rag of Ritual
     

The Red Rag of Ritual

by George Cusack
 

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The Red Rag of Ritual by George Cusack.
This book is a reproduction of the original book published in 1899 and may have some imperfections such as marks or hand-written notes.

Overview

The Red Rag of Ritual by George Cusack.
This book is a reproduction of the original book published in 1899 and may have some imperfections such as marks or hand-written notes.

Product Details

BN ID:
2940025867234
Publisher:
F. Warne
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
404 KB

Read an Excerpt


CHAPTER II 'MY SON' Father Methuen, the vicar of S. Sebastien's, was fond of calling himself a Catholic who worked on broad lines. What that meant exactly, no one knew or cared. If a man is personally popular, he may ' hold the opinions of a heathen Chinee, for all the generality of people will trouble!' And the vicar was popular. He remembered the exact number of children in a family, and always inquired after their respective ailments. For babies, in particular, he had a really intelligent admiration; in fact he never forgot any one, and, on the strength of this, he might have done anything he liked in the ritual line, only he was lazy. He called it having a soul above details. In any case the minutiae of worship with other unimportant duties, as the vicar called them, were left to his coadjutor, Father Philmore. Now Philmore was neither lazy nor popular; he was the sort of person whom people respectand let alone. It was rumoured privately that this apparently austere young man was entirely under the vicar'sthumb. That the vicar took all sorts of liberties with him, and called him ' the Infant,' on account of his youthful and embryonic appearance. In fact, the name had gradually become public property, no one exactly knew how, any more than they knew why they called their clergy 'Father.' Some one had started it, probably, and the others had followed. Inquiring minds were not lacking at S. Sebastien's to demand why these beardless and presumably guileless young clerics, whose lofty aims soared high above vulgar matrimony, should be so ambitious to be called ' Father'; and to demand also why some were Fathers and some were not. But we all know that people with inquiring minds area great nuisance, and that vulgar curiosity deserves no answer, particularly where...

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