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Red Roses for Me [Bonus Tracks]
     

Red Roses for Me [Bonus Tracks]

3.0 1
by The Pogues
 

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What set the Pogues apart from any number of other energetic Irish traditional bands was the sheer physical force of their performances, the punky swagger of their personalities, and Shane MacGowan's considerable gifts as a songwriter. Unfortunately, none of these qualities comes through very clearly on their first album, Red Roses for

Overview

What set the Pogues apart from any number of other energetic Irish traditional bands was the sheer physical force of their performances, the punky swagger of their personalities, and Shane MacGowan's considerable gifts as a songwriter. Unfortunately, none of these qualities comes through very clearly on their first album, Red Roses for Me. While the Pogues are in good form here, the production (by Stan Brennan) is thin and lacks the body or nuance to capture the finer details of the performances, robbing this recording of the fire the group would display on their later albums. And it's clear that MacGowan had not yet fully matured as a songwriter; there are a handful of superb songs here, such as "Transmetropolitan," "Streams of Whiskey," and "Down in the Ground Where the Dead Men Go," but some of the others suggest MacGowan was still learning how to fit all his ideas into his songs. Red Roses for Me is good and rowdy fun, but on Rum Sodomy & the Lash and If I Should Fall from Grace with God, the Pogues would prove they were capable of a lot more than that. [In 2006, Rhino Records gave Red Roses for Me a long-overdue reissue in the United States, with remastered audio, new liner notes (an enthusiastic appreciation from filmmaker Jim Jarmusch and a witty essay on the group's early days from Gavin Martin), and six bonus tracks. While "The Leaving of Liverpool" and "The Wild Rover" sound like quickly recorded demos and the version of "And the Band Played Waltzing Matilda" pales in comparison to the later recording on Rum Sodomy & the Lash, "Whiskey, You're the Devil" and "The Repeal of the Licensing Laws" kick up plenty of dust and would have added to the album's impact.]

Product Details

Release Date:
09/19/2006
Label:
Rhino
UPC:
0081227407124
catalogNumber:
74071

Tracks

Album Credits

Performance Credits

Pogues   Primary Artist
James Fearnley   Guitar
Jem Finer   Banjo,Guitar,Group Member
Shane MacGowan   Vocals,Group Member
Andrew Ranken   Drums
Spider Stacy   tin whistle,Group Member
Maestro Jimmy Fearnley   Group Member
Rocky ORiordan   Group Member
Andy The Clobberer Ranken   Group Member

Technical Credits

Eric Bogle   Composer
Elvis Costello   Producer
Pogues   Arranger
Stan Brennan   Producer,Audio Production
Philip Chevron   Producer,Reissue Assistant
Jem Finer   Arranger
Darryl Hunt   Reissue Assistant,Photo Courtesy
Shane MacGowan   Arranger,Composer
Nick Robbins   Engineer
Spider Stacy   Arranger,Composer,Reissue Assistant
Craig Thompson   Engineer
Jim Jarmusch   Liner Notes
Phil Smee   CD Package Design
Eric James   Reissue Assistant
Gavin Martin   Liner Notes
Brendan Behan   Composer
Rick Conrad   Reissue Assistant
Traditional   Composer
Carlos Anaia   Reissue Assistant
Maestro Jimmy Fearnley   Arranger
Rocky ORiordan   Arranger
Andy The Clobberer Ranken   Arranger
Steve Tynan   Sleeve Photo,Original Photography

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Red Roses for Me 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
If The Chieftains and The Clash were ever to collaborate, this might be what it would sound like. While this is the Pogues' first studio album, it is one of the best. While it lacks the polished production quality of later albums such as Hells Ditch and If I Should Fall From Grace With God, it highlights frontman Shane MacGowan's brilliant and unique arrangements of traditional Celtic tunes and his own songwriting and poetic abilities. Indeed, this is the Pogues in the raw--before higher-budget studio production put horns and other fluff on some of their later tracks. Another feature of this album is that you can usually understand the lyrics as sung by the notorious drunkard MacGowan; this is a far more daunting task on later albums, especially Hell's Ditch. A word of caution: this album is not for the squemish. It often deals with its subject matter in vulgar, graphic detail (
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is the Pogues' first studio effort, and while lacking the complexity of later efforts, it still ranks as one of their great albums. A smaller ensemble at the time (only five members, later to number as many as nine), they still deliver the goods on such tracks as Streams of Whiskey and Brendan Behan's The Auld Triangle. The goods they deliver are strong Celtic pub-stomps, with an undeniably punk asthetic, quite unlike anything else around at the time. Erin go Bragh!