The Red Scarf

The Red Scarf

4.4 36
by Kate Furnivall
     
 

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The Russian Concubine dazzled readers. Now, its gifted author delivers another sweeping historical novel.

Davinsky Labor Camp, Siberia, 1933: Only two things in this wretched place keep Sofia from giving up hope: the prospect of freedom, and the stories told by her friend and fellow prisoner Anna, of a charmed childhood in Petrograd, and her…  See more details below

Overview

The Russian Concubine dazzled readers. Now, its gifted author delivers another sweeping historical novel.

Davinsky Labor Camp, Siberia, 1933: Only two things in this wretched place keep Sofia from giving up hope: the prospect of freedom, and the stories told by her friend and fellow prisoner Anna, of a charmed childhood in Petrograd, and her fervent girlhood love for a passionate revolutionary named Vasily.

After a perilous escape, Sofia endures months of desolation and hardship. But, clinging to a promise she made to Anna, she subsists on the belief that someday she will track down Vasily. In a remote village, she's nursed back to health by a Gypsy family, and there she finds more than refuge?she also finds Mikhail Pashin, who, her heart tells her, is Vasily in disguise. He's everything she has ever wanted?but he belongs to Anna.

After coming this far, Sofia is tantalizingly close to freedom, family?even a future. All that stands in her way is the secret past that could endanger everything she has come to hold dear?

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly

Sophia Morozova's relationship with fragile Anna Fedorina begins through a small act of kindness at a 1930s Siberian labor camp. As the two inmates struggle daily to survive, they increasingly rely on each other for hope and comfort; when Anna falls ill, Sophia escapes, intending to find Anna's lifelong love, Vasily, and rescue Anna. Beautiful and charismatic, Sophia quickly becomes a force to reckon with in the town of Tivil, where she hopes to find Vasily, and her connections with powerful gypsy Rafik, the handsome factory director Mikhail Pashin and the stern but unreadable Aleksei Fomenko become satisfying sources of danger and desire. Furnivall (The Russian Concubine) paints a stark picture of rampant scarcity, grim regimentation and blaring propaganda in pre-WWII Soviet Russia. In pushing the limits of Sophia and Anna's love and friendship, she nicely pits small lives against a monolithic state, paradoxically composed of watchful villages. (July)

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Library Journal

Can a Russian Gypsy with mystical powers protect a wretched village from marauding soldiers and commissars? Does the daughter of a murdered priest succeed in springing her best friend from a Siberian labor camp? Will an innocent victim of the Gulag find her true love? Furnivall, whose previous novel, The Russian Concubine, was set in 1920s China, now moves to Siberia in 1933, when Stalin's agricultural collectivization policies sent millions to their deaths. Following the path of Dr. Zhivago and the more recent The People's Act of Love, this romantic confection can make a reader shiver with dread for the horrors visited on the two heroines imprisoned in a labor camp and quiver with anticipation for their happy endings. Furnivall shows she has the narrative skills to deliver a sweeping historical epic, but we get too much of a good thing with a too-convoluted plot and repetitive sufferings. Still, the novel arrives in time for great beach reading and will fit well into the popular fiction collections of most large public libraries.
—Barbara Conaty

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781440637957
Publisher:
Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date:
06/24/2008
Sold by:
Penguin Group
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
480
Sales rank:
281,949
File size:
1 MB
Age Range:
18 Years

Related Subjects

Meet the Author

Kate Furnivall was born in Wales and currently lives in Devon, England. Married and the mother of two sons, she has working in publishing and television advertising. She drew inspiration for The Russian Concubine from her mother’s experiences as a White Russian refugee in China.

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Red Scarf 4.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 32 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I picked this book up after reading The Russian Concubine, Furnivall's first book. I have to say, as much as I enjoyed TRC, this book is 10 times better!! Furnivall manages to blend a historically accurate depiction of Soviet Russia with a beautifully moving story of friendship and fate. The novel progresses at a comfortable pace, builds characters you truly care about, and follows a plot that will keep you enthralled! I am still recovering from the late nights when I simply could NOT put it down. I HIGHLY recommend this book!
TaraNJ More than 1 year ago
Another great book by Kate Furnivall. I love this author!
Kate2666 More than 1 year ago
I enjoyed the book it was well written it had good story line about two girls in labor camp who were able to develop such close friendship in such harsh times where most of the people only look out for themselves and their survival. The story is very sad it happens during Stalin regime where Russian country was starving, 80 % of population was in labor camps, people had to freedom of speech or any type of freedom and everyone was ratting others out for personal gain or because of fear. Anyway, one of the girls Sophia escape from labor camp in order to find her dying friend Anna first love Vasiliy so that he can help get her out of there. Story goes very well until in the middle of the book it becomes a little boring, Sophia reaches her destination she finds Vasiliy and then nothing happens so I was about to give up on the book but then something finally happens this crazy twist that I wasn’t expecting so my interest went back up and I finished the book, it had really good end so it was worth reading 400 something pages.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book is beautifully writen! I love all of Kate Furnivall's books (The Russian Concubine, The Girl from Junchow, and The Jewel of St. Petersburg). I have a passion for historical fiction, especially russian historical fiction. Kate's books are a godsend to me! The Red Scarf is a must read! The relationship between best friends Sophia and Anna is so moving. What those girls endure being imprisoned in Siberia is horrid. This book has everything from friendship, to love and romance, to thrills, as well as mysterious gypsy magic.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I didnt even want the book to end! That was a great read!
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Doc79 More than 1 year ago
I love everything about this book. The plot-The twist-even gypsy hocus pocus:) The main thing is the time period..The way The author writes is beautiful. I read this book after the authors other trilogy (The jewel of St. Petersburg, The Russian concubine, and the girl from Jen-chow) and became familiar with the Russian revolution so this book was a great ending for me. All these books are a must read!
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This book was a story of how one womans spirit and courage can change the lives of many! This story shared russian history that is not always written about and it was interesting...scary but interesting!
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The Red Scarf is an eye opening story of the Russian revolution and the horrors Lenin brought in his early years in order to fully control the country. While the storyline jumping makes the read more difficult, the weaving of the characters' stories by the end of the book makes the effort worthwhile.
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