The Red Sea Sharks

The Red Sea Sharks

5.0 4
by Hergé
     
 

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The classic graphic novel When his old friend Mohammed Ben Kalish Ezab is overthrown by Sheikh Bab El Ehr, Tintin goes to his aid. But before Tintin can help return his friend to power, he will have to survive shipwrecks, fires, and worst of all, Abdullah, the emir's rotten son.

Overview

The classic graphic novel When his old friend Mohammed Ben Kalish Ezab is overthrown by Sheikh Bab El Ehr, Tintin goes to his aid. But before Tintin can help return his friend to power, he will have to survive shipwrecks, fires, and worst of all, Abdullah, the emir's rotten son.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780316358484
Publisher:
Little, Brown Books for Young Readers
Publication date:
09/30/1976
Series:
Adventures of Tintin: Original Classic Series
Pages:
62
Sales rank:
171,860
Product dimensions:
8.75(w) x 11.62(h) x 0.50(d)
Age Range:
8 - 18 Years

Meet the Author

Hergé, one of the most famous Belgians in the world, was a comics writer and artist. The internationally successful Adventures of Tintin are his most well-known and beloved works. They have been translated into 38 different languages and have inspired such legends as Andy Warhol and Roy Lichtenstein. He wrote and illustrated for The Adventures of Tintin until his death in 1983.

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Red Sea Sharks 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Another fab story, with perhaps the best opening ever... the discussion about the Western and bumping into General Alcazar, who they've just been talking about. Dear old Zarzar is only one of ten reappearances in this book, the others including Golf Tango Fox himself, the nasally gifted Rastapopulous; his scurvy henchman Allan and (how could I leave her till last?) Castafiore, or as the Captain calls her during their (sadly) brief meeting, 'Castoroili'! It pulls plenty of punches and doesn't waste a moment. Best of all has to be the page with all the newspaper cuttings... but the Captain's battle with his number one fan, the awful Abdullah, is great too... I can't praise it enough, I'm afraid.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Except perhaps figuratively: Slave-trader=shark? Anyway. When the Emir's son Abdullah is sent to Marlinspike to stay for a time because the Emir is in danger, Tintin and the Captain decide to leave as they have put up with enough pranks from the boy. So they go to Khemed to see the Emir and perhaps try to rescue him as well. But when they find out from him that his deposer Bab El Ehr is trafficking in slaves, Tintin decides to put an end to that if he possibly can. He and the captain manage to get on a slave ship. After surviving many dangers - explosives, guns, shipwreck, and a chance meeting with the Milanese nightingale Bianca Castafiore - they end up saving a whole shipload of Negroes from being sold as slaves. This is a fantastic story. One of the frames is worth getting the book - the picture of Captain Haddock with Castafiore.
MusicPrincess7 More than 1 year ago
I am Tintin's number one fan. This is one of my favorite books in the series. I like as much as Tintin in Tibet, which is saying a lot! It's hilarious, and Tintin's noble determination to free the slaves lives up to expectations. To be honest, Herge rocks, and he did great on this one! I only have one question: WHERE ARE CHANG AND ZORRINO?!?!?!?! They're so awesome!!!!!!!!!!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago