Redeeming Eve: Women Writers of the English Renaissance

Overview

An introduction to women writers of the English Renaissance which takes up 44 works, many as thumbnail sketches; shows how women's writing was hampered by the assumption that poets were male, by restriction to pious subject matter, by the doctrine that only silent women are virtuous, by criticism that praised women as patrons or muses and ignored their writing, and above all by crippling educational theories.

Originally published in 1990.

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Overview

An introduction to women writers of the English Renaissance which takes up 44 works, many as thumbnail sketches; shows how women's writing was hampered by the assumption that poets were male, by restriction to pious subject matter, by the doctrine that only silent women are virtuous, by criticism that praised women as patrons or muses and ignored their writing, and above all by crippling educational theories.

Originally published in 1990.

The Princeton Legacy Library uses the latest print-on-demand technology to again make available previously out-of-print books from the distinguished backlist of Princeton University Press. These paperback editions preserve the original texts of these important books while presenting them in durable paperback editions. The goal of the Princeton Legacy Library is to vastly increase access to the rich scholarly heritage found in the thousands of books published by Princeton University Press since its founding in 1905.

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

"Redeeming Eve is an introduction to women writers of the English Renaissance which takes up 44 works, many as thumbnail sketches. . . . [Beilin] shows how women's writing was hampered by the assumption that poets were male, by restriction to pious subject matter, by the doctrine that only silent women are virtuous, by criticism that praised women as patrons or muses and ignored their writing, and above all by crippling educational theories. . . . The interesting chapters on Anne Askew, Elizabeth Cary, Aemilia Lanyer, and Mary Wroth are alone well worth the purchase price."--Linda Woodbridge, Renaissance Quarterly

"[Beilin's] approach is wise and fruitful, shunning a radical, imperialistic feminist criticism that would seek to make these Renaissance women feminists. . . . [The book] serves the purpose of an excellent introduction to a lively topic."--Virginia Quarterly Review

"[Beilin] engages the writings of Renaissance women with an understanding and appreciation that render them at once more accessible and more significant. [Her] approach is literary, tactful, and sensitive to tonal and psychic nuance."--Judith H. Anderson, Recent Studies in the English Renaissance

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780691608037
  • Publisher: Princeton University Press
  • Publication date: 7/14/2014
  • Series: Princeton Legacy Library Series
  • Pages: 372
  • Product dimensions: 6.10 (w) x 9.10 (h) x 0.90 (d)

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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 22, 2001

    This is a must-read for students of English Renaissance Literature

    In one of the most seminal books about the growing scholarship of women writers of the English Renaissance, Beilin argues for the success of a plethora of women writers in playing the role of Eves in their literary production, thus gaining a negotiable space for authorship, an arena that was constructed and instructed by male culture and rule. It is mainly through the perspicacious manipulation of the metaphor of 'the redeeming eve' that women writers such as Mary Sidney, Elizabeth Cary, Mary wroth, to name but few, were given a literary and creative space. The importance of this book lies in Beilin's insistence on women's acceptance to integrate into the patriarchal culture through writing what was acceptable, an acceptance that, though, seems consolidatory of the patriarchal culture, was, indeed, subversive and, even, revolutionary.

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