Redefining Adaptation Studies

Overview

Since films were first produced, adapted works have predominantly borrowed primarily from traditional texts, such as novels and plays. Likewise, the study of film adaptations has also been fairly traditional, rarely venturing beyond a comparison of the source material to its often less revered counterpart. Redefining Adaptation Studies breaks new ground in showing the range of possibilities that transcend the literature/film paradigm. These essays focus on the idea of 'adaptation' and what it means in different ...

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Redefining Adaptation Studies

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Overview

Since films were first produced, adapted works have predominantly borrowed primarily from traditional texts, such as novels and plays. Likewise, the study of film adaptations has also been fairly traditional, rarely venturing beyond a comparison of the source material to its often less revered counterpart. Redefining Adaptation Studies breaks new ground in showing the range of possibilities that transcend the literature/film paradigm. These essays focus on the idea of 'adaptation' and what it means in different socio-political contexts. Above all this collection shows how cultural and political factors determine the meaning of the term and its potential for developing new approaches to learning.

The contributors to this volume look at adaptation in different contexts and develop new ways to approach adaptation, not just as a literature-through-film issue but as something which can be used to develop other skills, such as creative writing and personal and social skills. Aimed at teachers in high schools and universities at the under- and postgraduate levels, this volume not only suggests how 'adaptation' might be used in different disciplines, but how it might improve the learning experience for teachers and students alike.

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Editorial Reviews

Choice
A superb resource for teachers....Practical and theoretically aware; will be of service to those who teach courses that involve screen adaptation. Recommended.
CHOICE
A superb resource for teachers....Practical and theoretically aware; will be of service to those who teach courses that involve screen adaptation. Recommended.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780810872981
  • Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, Inc.
  • Publication date: 2/23/2010
  • Pages: 182
  • Product dimensions: 5.90 (w) x 8.90 (h) x 0.50 (d)

Meet the Author

Dennis Cutchins is associate professor of English at Brigham Young University, where he teaches adaptation studies, as well as American and western literature.

Laurence Raw teaches at Baskent University. He is the author of Adapting Henry James to the Screen (2006), Adapting Nathaniel Hawthorne to the Screen (2008), and The Ridley Scott Encyclopedia (2009), all published by Scarecrow Press.

James M. Welsh is professor emeritus of English at Salisbury University. He is the coeditor of The Literature/Film Reader (2007) and No Country for Old Men: From Novel to Film (2009), both published by Scarecrow Press.

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Table of Contents

Foreword Deborah Cartmell vii

Introduction: How Should We Teach It? How Could We Teach It? James M. Welsh ix

1 Adapting Wilde for the Performance Classroom: "No Small Parts" Frances Babbage Robert Neumark Jones Lauren Williams 1

2 "It Must All Change Now": Victor Hugo's Lucretia Borgia and Adaptation Richard J. Hand 17

3 "Never Seek to Tell Thy Love": E-Adapting Blake in the Classroom Richard Berger 31

4 Adaptation and Creative Writing: Brokeback Mountain on the London Underground Mark O'Thomas 45

5 Pedagogy and Policy in Intermedial Adaptations Freda Chapple 55

6 Toward a Pedagogy for Adaptation Studies Sevgi Şahin Laurence Raw 71

7 Writing the Adaptation: Teaching an Upper-Division College Course for the Screenwriter Diane Lake 85

8 Whose Life Is It, Anyway? Adaptation, Collective Memory, and (Auto)Biographical Processes Suzanne Diamond 95

9 The Numbers Game: Quantifying the Audience Alexis Weedon 111

10 Engaging the Ear: Teaching Radio Drama Adaptations Elke Huwiler 133

11 The Pleasures of "Theater Film": Stage to Film Adaptation Milan Pribisic 147

Filmography 161

Bibliography 163

Index 173

About the Editors and Contributors 179

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