Redemption of Althalus [NOOK Book]

Overview

Mythmakers and world builders of the first order, David and Leigh Eddings spin tales that make imaginations soar. Readers have thrilled to The Belgarlad. and The Malloreon, magic-filled masterworks chronicling the timeless conflict between good and evil. But with those sagas brought to their triumphant conclusions, fans were left hungry for more. Now at last the wait is over. Althalus is a thief, a scoundrel, and altogether not a very good person. Dwela is a Goddess, the most beautiful, enchanting and powerful of...
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Redemption of Althalus

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Overview

Mythmakers and world builders of the first order, David and Leigh Eddings spin tales that make imaginations soar. Readers have thrilled to The Belgarlad. and The Malloreon, magic-filled masterworks chronicling the timeless conflict between good and evil. But with those sagas brought to their triumphant conclusions, fans were left hungry for more. Now at last the wait is over. Althalus is a thief, a scoundrel, and altogether not a very good person. Dwela is a Goddess, the most beautiful, enchanting and powerful of them all. Together they must go on an epic over evil. Boldly written and brilliantly imagined, The Redemption of Althalus is an epic fantasy to be savored in the reading and returned to again and again.

About the Authors:
David Eddings was born in Spokane, Washington, in 1931, and raised in the Puget Sound area north of Seattle. A born storyteller, Eddings created two of the most popular fantasy series of all-time:The Belgarlad and The Mallorean.

Leigh Eddings has collaborated with her husband for more than a dozen years. The Eddingses live in the southwest.

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Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble
Our Review
A Fun-Filled, One-Volume Epic
The Redemption of Althalus is the first stand-alone, single-volume high fantasy saga written by the bestselling husband and wife team of David and Leigh Eddings. Their previous beloved series include the Belgariad, the Malloreon, and the Elenium, and although Althalus is bursting with all the daring escapades their multitude of fans expect, it is also an engaging departure for the authors. Althalus is a grand adventure that is bound to enthrall readers of the authors' previous, multivolume epics, but it features a precision of plot and language that can be achieved only by having an actual resolution.

Althalus is a young thief and occasional killer known for his skill and incredible luck. A number of capers end without much monetary reward for him, until he stumbles into a shrine built to the fertility goddess Dweia. Soon afterward he meets with the wizard Ghend, who hires him to steal the Book, a magical tome that can be found in the bizarre House at the End of the World. There, Althalus discovers Dweia in the form of a black cat and learns that she has chosen him to aid her in a war against Ghend and her evil brother, the destroyer god Daeva. Together Althalus and Dweia use the power of the Book and gather together a small team of questionable heroes who must battle Ghend's supernatural forces and armies. The thief Althalus can only hope his luck holds out for this one last task, since the very fate of humanity is at stake.

A stand-alone epic fantasy is a rarity in the modern-day publishing world and a concept that should be embraced more often. The Redemption of Althalus gives us all the action, sorcery, humor, and soaring imagination of a grand series but doesn't leave any loose threads, fractured subplots, or loss of momentum. A great deal of fun action and generally good-natured exploits are punctuated by the authors' usual satire on religion and high society. In one clever turn, Althalus enters a city where the wealthy are forced to hide their riches and live even worse than the poor in order to avoid taxation. Althalus is well-polished and smoothly constructed, with real storytelling muscle and a gratifying finale. The Eddingses should be praised for their willingness to put a cap on this particular story in an effort to offer other wonderfully developed worlds to their readers.

--Tom Piccirilli

Tom Piccirilli is the author of eight novels, including Hexes, Shards, and his Felicity Grove mystery series, consisting of The Dead Past and Sorrow's Crown. He has sold more than 100 stories to the anthologies Future Crimes, Bad News, The Conspiracy Files, and Best of the American West II. An omnibus collection of 40 stories titled Deep into That Darkness Peering is also available. Tom divides his time between New York City and Estes Park, Colorado.

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
As the first stand-alone one-volume epic fantasy by the popular Eddings team (whose series include The Belgariad; The Malloreon and The Elenium), this hefty saga about Good trouncing Evil plumps an engaging young reprobate hero into the arms of a--literally--divine feline heroine. A professional thief and occasional murderer, Althalus accepts a commission to steal a supernatural tome known as the Book. When he arrives at the mysterious House at the End of the World, a lissome black cat with emerald eyes turns out to be the fertility goddess Dweia. Together they enlist a Mission Improbable team to out-sorcel the assorted villains marshaled by the sorcerer Ghend, who is bent on converting this medieval-like world from the worship of Dweia's good god-brother, Deiwos, to awful servitude under their wicked sibling Daeva. Plenty of derring-do spices up the first two-thirds of this jolly romp, and some zingy flashes of wit home in neatly on stuffy human institutions like overorganized religion and landed aristocracies. Unfortunately, the Eddingses can't resist a lengthy time-traveling reprise, which drags the story down into so-so conventionality. Though the Eddingses' multitudinous fans will likely feel right at home here in their safely magical realm of good-natured fun, this circle of would-be faerie has been trodden so often that here it yields very little deep-rooted literary greenery to munch on or to savor, still less to ruminate upon. (Dec. 26) Copyright 2000 Cahners Business Information.
VOYA
Good versus evil and epic quests are typical themes in books by the Eddings duo, and this one is no exception. Althalus, a thief and liar, has been chosen by the goddess Dweia to help her with the ongoing argument between her two brothers, Deiwas, Creator of All and Lord of Light, and Daeva, Destroyer of All and Lord of Darkness. Daeva wants to plunge the world into nothingness, and it is up to Althalus to stop him. Dweia sends Althalus on a quest to find the dark book of Daeva so it can be destroyed. Along the way, five special companions join him. With their help, he is able to win the battles, but the war itself actually comes down to a confrontation between him and Ghend, Daeva's puppet. At the final confrontation, Ghend refuses to turn against Daeva, and consequently is pulled through a magical doorway into nothingness, taking the evil book with him. Although a good book and a fun read, Redemption is a bit of a disappointment. The characters all seem like duplicates of those in the authors' Belgariad series, with Althalus being Belgarad and the others in similar visages. The names have changed but the characters and the basic story have not. Libraries that have the Belgariad series in their collections might not need this one. Nevertheless those libraries with many fans of the Eddings will want to give this book a try. VOYA CODES: 3Q 4P J S A/YA (Readable without serious defects; Broad general YA appeal; Junior High, defined as grades 7 to 9; Senior High, defined as grades 10 to 12; Adult and Young Adult). 2000, Del Rey, 726p, . Ages 14 to Adult. Reviewer: Vicky Burkholder SOURCE: VOYA, June 2001 (Vol. 24, No. 2)
Library Journal
Inexplicably down on his luck, the notoriously successful thief Althalus accepts employment by a mysterious stranger who wants him to steal a book from the House at the End of the World. When Althalus reaches his destination, he meets a goddess in the form of a cat and discovers his true mission in life--to save the world from the machinations of a deity bent on destroying creation. The authors of a number of best-selling fantasy series, including the "Belgariad" and the "Mallorean," have created a stand-alone, one-volume "epic" fantasy that features a cast of engaging characters, some fanciful plot twists, and a light-hearted atmosphere that should appeal strongly to fans and first-time readers alike. Libraries should consider multiple copies to fill the probable demand for this title. Highly recommended. Copyright 2000 Cahners Business Information.
From the Publisher
"Highly recommended . . . Featuring a cast of engaging characters, some fanciful plot twists, and a light-hearted atmosphere that should appeal strongly to fans and first-time readers alike."
--Library Journal

"The story takes off. The interactions between characters, straightforward plotting, and doses of wry humor keep the tale humming."
--Booklist

"An engaging young reprobate hero . . . [A] magical realm of good-natured fun."
--Publishers Weekly

"A compelling, involving story."
--Science Fiction Chronicle

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780345446923
  • Publisher: Random House Publishing Group
  • Publication date: 1/23/2001
  • Sold by: Random House
  • Format: eBook
  • Sales rank: 80,961
  • File size: 764 KB

Meet the Author

David Eddings published his first novel, High Hunt, in 1973, before turning to the field of fantasy and The Belgariad, soon followed by The Malloreon. Born in Spokane, Washington, in 1931, and raised in the Puget Sound area north of Seattle, he received his bachelor of arts degree from Reed College in Portland, Oregon, in 1954 and a master of arts degree from the University of Washington in 1961. He has served in the United States Army, has worked as a buyer for the Boeing Company, and has been a grocery clerk and a college English teacher.

Leigh Eddings has collaborated with her husband for more than a dozen years.

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Read an Excerpt

CHAPTER ONE

Althalus the thief spent ten days on the road down out of the mountains of
Kagwher to reach the imperial city of Deika. As he was coming out of the
foothills, he passed a limestone quarry where miserable slaves spent their
lives under the whip laboriously sawing building blocks out of the
limestone with heavy bronze saws. Althalus had heard about slavery, of
course, but this was the first time he'd ever actually seen slaves. As he
strode on toward the plains of Equero, he had a little chat with his good
luck about the subject, strongly suggesting to her that if she really
loved him, she'd do everything she possibly could to keep him from ever
becoming a slave.

The city of Deika lay at the southern end of a large lake in northern
Equero, and it was even more splendid than the stories had said it was. It
was surrounded by a high stone wall made of squared-off limestone blocks,
and all the buildings inside the walls were also made of stone.

The broad streets of Deika were paved with flagstones, and the public
buildings soared to the sky. Everyone in town who thought he was
important wore a splendid linen mantle, and every private house was
identified by a statue of its owner-usually so idealized that any actual
resemblance to the man so identified was purely coincidental.

Althalus was garbed in clothes suitable for the frontier, and he received
many disparaging glances from passersby as he viewed the splendors of the
imperial city. After a while, he grew tired of that and sought out a
quarter of town where the men in the streets wore more commonplace
garments and less superior expressions.

Finally he located a fishermen's tavern near the lakefront, and he stopped
there to sit and to listen, since fishermen the world over love to talk.
He sat unobtrusively nursing a cup of sour wine while the tar-smeared men
around him talked shop.

"I don't believe I've ever seen you here before," one of the men said to
Althalus.

"I'm from out of town," Althalus replied.

"Oh? Where from?"

"Up in the mountains. I came down to look at civilization."

"Well, what do you think of our city?"

"Very impressive. I'm almost as impressed with your city as some of the
town's rich men seem to be with themselves."

One of the fishermen laughed cynically. "You passed near the forum, I take
it."

"If that's the place where all the fancy buildings are, yes I did. And if
you want it, you can take as much of my share of it as you desire."

"You didn't care for our wealthy?"

"Apparently not as much as they did, that's for certain. People like us
should avoid the rich if we possibly can. Sooner or later, we'll probably
be bad for their eyes."

"How's that?" another fisherman asked.

"Well, all those fellows in the forum-the ones who wear fancy nightgowns
in the street-kept looking down their noses at me. If a man spends all his
time doing that, sooner or later it's going to make him cross-eyed."

The fishermen all laughed, and the atmosphere in the tavern became relaxed
and friendly. Althalus had skillfully introduced the topic dearest to his
heart, and they all spent the rest of the afternoon talking about the
well-to-do of Deika. By evening, Althalus had committed several names to
memory. He spent another few days narrowing down his list, and he
ultimately settled on a very wealthy salt merchant named Kweso. Then he
went to the central marketplace, visited the marble-lined public baths,
and then dipped into his purse to buy some clothing that more closely fit
into the current fashion of Deika. The key word for a thief who's
selecting a costume for business purposes is "nondescript," for fairly
obvious reasons. Then Althalus went to the rich men's part of town and
spent several more days-and nights-watching merchant Kweso's walled-in
house. Kweso himself was a plump, rosy-cheeked bald man who had a sort of
friendly smile. On a number of occasions Althalus even managed to get
close enough to him to be able to hear him talking. He actually grew to be
rather fond of the chubby little fellow, but that's not unusual, really.
When you get right down to it, a wolf is probably quite fond of deer.

Althalus managed to pick up the name of one of Kweso's neighbors, and with
a suitably businesslike manner, he went in through the salt merchant's
gate one morning, walked up to his door, and knocked. After a moment or
two, a servant opened the door. "Yes?" the servant asked.

"I'd like to speak with Gentleman Melgor," Althalus said politely. "It's
on business."

"I'm afraid you have the wrong house, sir," the servant said. "Gentleman
Melgor's house is the one two doors down."

Althalus smacked his forehead with his open hand. "How stupid of me," he
apologized. "I'm very sorry to have disturbed you." His eyes, however,
were very busy. Kweso's door latch wasn't very complicated, and his
entryway had several doors leading off it. He lowered his voice. "I hope
my pounding didn't wake your master," he said.

The servant smiled briefly. "I rather doubt it," he said. "The master's
bedroom is upstairs at the back of the house. He usually gets out of bed
about this time in the morning anyway, so he's probably already awake."

"That's a blessing," Althalus said, his eyes still busy. "You said that
Melgor's house is two doors down?"

"Yes." The servant leaned out through the doorway and pointed. "It's that
way-the house with the blue door. You can't miss it."

"My thanks, friend, and I'm sorry to have disturbed you." Then Althalus
turned and went back out to the street. He was grinning broadly. His luck
was still holding him cuddled to her breast. The "wrong house" ploy had
given him even more information than he'd expected. His luck had
encouraged that servant to tell him all sorts of things. It was still
quite early in the morning, and if this was Kweso's normal time to rise,
that was a fair indication that he went to bed early as well. He'd be
sound asleep by midnight. The garden around his house was mature, with
large trees and broad flowering bushes that would provide cover. Getting
inside the house would be no problem, and now Althalus knew where Kweso's
bedroom was. All that was left to do was to slip into the house in the
middle of the night, go directly to Kweso's bedroom, wake him, and lay a
bronze knife against his throat to persuade him to cooperate. The whole
affair could be settled in short order.

Unfortunately, however, it didn't turn out that way at all. The salt
merchant's chubby, good-natured face obviously concealed a much sharper
mind than Althalus expected. Not long after midnight, the clever thief
scaled the merchant's outer wall, crept through the garden, and quietly
entered the house. He stopped in the entryway to listen. Except for a few
snores coming from the servants' quarters, the house was silent. As
quietly as a shadow, Althalus went to the foot of the stairs and started
up.

It was at that point that Kweso's house became very noisy. The three dogs
were almost as large as ponies, and their deep-throated barking seemed to
shake the walls.

Althalus immediately changed his plans. The open air of the nighttime
streets suddenly seemed enormously attractive.

The dogs at the foot of the stairs seemed to have other plans, however.
They started up, snarling and displaying shockingly large fangs.

There were shouts coming from upstairs, and somebody was lighting candles.

Althalus waited tensely until the dogs had almost reached him. Then, with
an acrobatic skill he didn't even know he had, he jumped high over the top
of the dogs, tumbled on down to the foot of the stairs, sprang to his
feet, and ran back outside.

As he raced across the garden with the dogs snapping at his heels, he
heard a buzzing sound zip past his left ear. Somebody in the house, either
the deceptively moon-faced Kweso himself or one of his meek-looking
servants, seemed to be a very proficient archer.

Althalus scrambled up the wall as the dogs snapped at his heels
and more arrows bounced off the stones, spraying his face with chips and
fragments.

He rolled over the top of the wall and dropped into the street, running
almost before his feet hit the paving stones. Things had not turned out
the way he'd planned. His tumble down the stairs had left scrapes and
bruises in all sorts of places, and he'd managed to severely twist one of
his ankles in his drop to the street. He limped on, filling the air around
him with curses.

Then somebody in Kweso's house opened the front gate, and the dogs came
rushing out.

Now that, Althalus felt, was going just a little too far. He'd admitted
his defeat by running away, but Kweso evidently wasn't satisfied with
victory and wanted blood as well.

It took some dodging around and clambering over several walls, but the
thief eventually shook off the pursuing dogs. Then he went across town to
put himself a long way from all the excitement and sat down on a
conveniently placed public bench to think things over. Civilized men were
obviously not as docile as they appeared on the surface, and Althalus
decided then and there that he'd seen as much of the city of Deika as he
really wanted to see. What puzzled him the most, though, was how his luck
had failed to warn him about those dogs. Could it be that she'd been
asleep? He'd have to speak with her about that.
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 148 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(86)

4 Star

(29)

3 Star

(12)

2 Star

(11)

1 Star

(10)

Your Rating:

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 148 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 16, 2001

    do not waste your time

    If you have half a brain and like intelligent, thought-provoking fantasy books (I know, I know, some would say that this is an oxymoron and in today's publishing world, it certainly seems more true than not), don't buy this book and don't waste your time on it. The dialogue is mind-numbingly repetitive and asinine. The plot starts out with promise but quickly degrades into utter predictability. The story is internally contradictory and, without giving away the ridiculous climax of the book, the whole conflict could have been avoided if only the main character had used a certain magic available to him in the beginning, rather than the end. Ugh. This is definitely not the Eddings' finest hour. Reading it is a very disheartening experience, particularly if you've enjoyed some of their previous work. Avoid this book -- save your time and money and read something more challenging and better written, for instance, George R.R. Martin's Fire and Ice series.

    4 out of 11 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted December 9, 2008

    more from this reviewer

    Excellent epic fantasy

    In a choice that only proves the Gods work in mysterious ways, the Goddess Dweia selects a thief, who has committed murder, as humanity's champion. ALTHALUS is proud to be one of the top ten thieves, a top five liar, and an occasional killer when the need is there. <P>His latest client, Ghend, a servant of the destroyer God Daeva, hires ALTHALUS to steal a book in a house at the edge of the world. He arrives at his destination, finds the book, and meets Dweio disguised as a cat. Dweio teaches ALTHALUS to read and use the book before the pair ventures back into the realm of mankind. The latest battle has just begun between good and evil with many dying on both sides, but the final victory resides with THE REDEMPTION OF ALTHALUS. <P> David and Leigh Eddings have been writing exciting epic fantasy for years, but THE REDEMPTION OF ALTHALUS is their finest hour. Readers will liken the work to that of Tolkien and Brooks yet see much originality in the fast-moving story line. Fans will believe in chattering cats speaking 'humanese', magical houses, and godess manifestations as everyday occurrences. This acceptance allows the audience to concentrate on the interpersonal relationships that turn this epic fantasy into quite an achievement for this writing duet. <P>Harriet Klausner

    3 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 13, 2008

    A good read if you've got nothing better to do........

    I first came across Eddings' work several years ago while I was at a point in my life where all there was to do was read or lift weights (some of you will understand that, others won't). Eddings work as always been slightly above average, however......this one was a slight disapointment. The end result of reading 'The redemption of Althalus' was an over powering desire to go back and re-read 'The Belgariad' series and start the whole ride all over again.

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 10, 2007

    One of the Best I've ever read

    When you first start off reading the book it is ok. Then u get to the middle where it's talking about all this war stuff and it's really kind of boring to me. I'm not a big war person, even with strategies and all. But towards the end it gets really facinating! I think everyone should read this book. It's really different and unexpected!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 26, 2007

    Best stand alone book ever

    Brilliant book that is as original as is possible these days. It is the only book i have been able to read 5 times in a row and each time i read it, i uncover new mysteries. To those who found it dissapointing, why not re-read it, you'll be suprised (unless your a shortsighted narrowminded reader with no appreciation for true fantasy)

    1 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 17, 2006

    Best. Book. Ever.

    This book is a wonderful combination of wit, humor, romance, and action. It has a compelling storyline, and in depth characters. A absolute masterpiece.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 27, 2000

    I would have expected better

    A poor showing from the Eddingses. This book draws heavily from their past work on the Belgariad and the Mallorean. It almost seems like it was put together to pay rent in the sense that I found very little originality in the plot. Furthermore, it seemed to have no coherence and jumped around quite a bit. I could equate almost every character's personality with those contained in past works. For example: Althalus - Belgarath/Silk Andine - Ce'Nedra Eliar - Garion Dweia - Polgara Khalor - Brand The similarities made character development almost a joke. Also, the last part is almost a verbatim re-hash of the first section. Not only did the authors cannibalize their prior work, but they had to repeat themselves in the same volume. I have been a dedicated reader of the authors' work and feel comfortable in saying this is by far their worst.

    1 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 11, 2014

    So so

    Starts great...continues that way for about 250 pages. And then it turns into mindless chaotic chatter among all the various characters as they plan the wars, battle, victory, future, etc etc. I do not know why the Eddings did all the "cutsey" stuff, but the story lost the cohesion of earlier chapters. I like most of their books (Belgariad, Malorean etc) but something was lost in the second half of this one, sorry.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 11, 2013

    Love this book. But where is eBelgarion & eSparhawk? Sigh

    More Eddings magic and characterization! Why can't we have his true classics in this form?

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 26, 2012

    An amusing adventure.

    Having found this book through other Edding's books, I was not disappointed to find that his ability to take cliche tropes and make them fun and exciting again had not been lost. I've read this book three or four times, and they will not be my last. Definitely worth a read, particularly if you're a fan of the Belgariad and Mallorean, as you'll find Althalus to be similar to Silk.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 17, 2012

    Second time through

    I've read this book before many years ago. I still have the paperback copy, but the years and humidity got to it. I totally enjoyed reading it before and am enjoying it all over again. I highly recommend this book to Eddings fans. Truly worth the expense! There were funny parts; there were serious parts.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 14, 2012

    Fantastic

    I've read this book more times than I care to count...and I'm still amazed with what I find. A fun story, beautifully written, with believable and easily related to characters that you can't help but love. Granted, its not as good as the belgariad or mallorean, how could it be without being a series? Still, a definite re read for years to come

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 25, 2011

    A story of high wit

    Well written and humorous tale woven like a living legend. The plot turns in funny and smart ways as you follow the cutpurse while he outsmarts the forces of evil.

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  • Posted March 16, 2011

    Amusing

    Not the best book I've ever read but definitely worth my time. I did find it to be funny. My only complaint is that the characters didn't really evolve enough. Also that the me all reacted to their GFs the same way and vice versa (if that makes sense).

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  • Posted December 17, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    Mixed feelings

    CONTAIN SPOILERS! Originally I bought this book for my husband, I was never much for epic fantasies. While waiting for him to finish cooking supper, I started reading the first pages and I was hooked, the story started off really good, and was well written, I was enjoying the book until Althalus leaves the house with Emmy, after that, it wasn't so entertaining, the writing became flat, the characters predictable, and the authors made MAJOR mistakes, for example, Althalus tells Eliar that they shouldn't use the doors to unfamiliar places since they don't know that's on the other side, on the next page Althalus uses the door to go to the unfamiliar place (?!) It took David and Leigh 5 paragraphs to forget that they were not supposed to use the doors, that annoyed me enormously. Two authors, an editor (I assume there is one) and none of them realized that their characters contradict themselves all the time? The ho-hum business with the doors was confusing, and Dweia always had a "rule" that suited them, all the rules she pulled from her sleeve were to their advantage only. I agree with the reader that said that the dialogues are repetitive, and there's no stuggle for the good guys, everything is served to them in a silver plate. On the bright side, Eddings got me interested in epic fantasy, now I want to read more, I enjoyed checking the maps to follow the story, and overall their writing (except for the contradictions and tiresome dialogues I described) was really good. In the end, they atoned with me when they repeat the adventure in Arum, it was great and refreshing to revive the whole thing with Ghend as their partner (and yes, again the annoying contradiction: did't Dweia say that they weren't supposed to used the doors to change the past? OH! But this time Dweia "knew" a way to do it without disturbing the future... Yeah, right! They steal Daeva's black book, something they should have done FROM THE BEGINNING and that doesn't alter the future)
    I don't regreat reading this book, I just wished that the authors weren't so distracted and took more time to polish some details.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 4, 2009

    Amazing Book

    A friend of mine recommended this book to me a couple of weeks back, and i decided to check it out. I ordered the book, and once it came in, i got right to work on reading it.
    I haven't finished the reading it just yet, but it is possibly the best book that i've ever read. Its creative, and it holds my attention quite well. There is never a dull moment in this book. The characters stand out and the plot is amazing. This book is definitely a must have.
    If you enjoy adventure this is definitely the book you should read.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 17, 2006

    beauttiful

    i loved this book, it showed be a different kind of fantasy that have never experienced. it is a wonderful book

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 2, 2006

    Amazing

    This is one of my all-time favorite books. it captivates readers imediately. readers sympathize with althalus' character and despite his roguish ways, i was drawn to the complexity and eagerness to have fun that is displayed in althalus. this fantasy is fast-paced and enjoyable, keeping its audience turning the pages until the very end. in itself, there are many original adventure stories, and the ideas discussed in the book are at the very heart of imagination.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 17, 2005

    Trilogy in itself

    Mr. and Mrs. Eddings do it again. They create in one book what others can't accomplish in three. They come back again with their terrific humor, action and detailed stories. If you don't want to read more than one book, but want great satisfaction this is the one. Be careful though, they will catch you and draw you into reading all of their books.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 28, 2005

    horrible

    the main character was just plain stupid. he announces that he's a thief in a tavern and talks about where he's going for loot. then he goes to break into someone's house and KNOCKS ON THE DOOR pretending to be at the wrong house to look around. his plan? break in and hold a knife to the guy's throat, letting him get a basic description. your supposed to slip in when no ones home, take small things of value and get out. if that were real he wouldnt live long enough to steal much

    0 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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