Redeye: A Western

Redeye: A Western

5.0 2
by Clyde Edgerton
     
 

View All Available Formats & Editions

A New York Times Notable Book. Hang on to your ten gallon hats--Clyde Edgerton has taken his eye for detail, his ear for humor, and his nose for the odor of religious hypocrisy to the Wild West. In REDEYE, he leads us back to turn-of-the-century Colorado, where a motley crew of innocents and scoundrels, visionaries and vultures, tells us How the West Was Made Safe for

Overview

A New York Times Notable Book. Hang on to your ten gallon hats--Clyde Edgerton has taken his eye for detail, his ear for humor, and his nose for the odor of religious hypocrisy to the Wild West. In REDEYE, he leads us back to turn-of-the-century Colorado, where a motley crew of innocents and scoundrels, visionaries and vultures, tells us How the West Was Made Safe for Free Enterprise. "A Hollywood pitchman might call REDEYE Eudora Welty meets Mark Twain. An admirer of good fiction might say that Clyde Edgerton has combined structure, character, and style to create a small gem of a novel."--New York Times Book Review.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
The redoubtable Edgerton jauntily plumbs new territory in this tall-tale sixth novel (after In Memory of Junior), departing from the South that was the setting of his previous books. The wilds of southern Colorado in the 1890s are home to his cast of transplanted Carolinians, a quirky bunch whose antics have much in common with those of their brethren in Edgerton's other books. The Copeland family has come west to Mumford Rock en masse, led by P.J. (Pleasant James), a newly licensed embalmer with big ideas. His ambitions are abetted by shifty Billy Blankenship, who plans to turn the cliff dwellings at Mesa Largo into the forerunner of Disney World. Together they engage in some highly questionable commercial ventures, encountering en route an oddly matched group of Western frontiersmen, renegade Mormons, a pair of alcoholic Indians, an aristocratic young English scholar and an obsessive bounty hunter and his mixed-breed ``catchdog'' named Redeye. Artfully using a kaleidoscopic sequence of first-person vignettes and shifting the narrative voice among this ragtag crew, Edgerton larks along from one outrageous incident to another, beginning with a plan to explode the corpse of a dead ``Chinaman'' on the platform of the train depot. Lurking on the fringe is the dog-owning bounty hunter intent on wreaking vengeance on the Mormons responsible for an infamous (real) 1892 shootout with a wagon train of pioneers. By the time Redeye narrates his own version of events, we believe every word. Fun from start to finish, this tale should go on building sales right through Christmas. (Apr.)
Library Journal
Edgerton (In Memory of Junior, LJ 9/1/92) has strayed from the familiar North Carolina setting of his former novels to tell a rollicking tale of cowboys and Indians, Englishmen and maidens, all set in Colorado 100 years ago. The cliff dwellings of southwest Colorado attract a motley crew of explorers in 1892, each with a personal agenda. Abel Merriwether, a local rancher and amateur archaeologist, wants to explore and protect the site; Andrew Collier, an Englishman, wants to write about it; Billy Blankenship, a local businessman, wants to develop it for tourism; Bishop Thorpe, a Mormon saint, hopes to find proof that Jesus visited there 2000 years before; and Cobb Pittman, a drifter with a red-eyed dog, seeks revenge on Thorpe for the Mountain Meadows Massacre of 1875. How this diverse bunch converges for an ill-fated tour of the site is unforgettable. A master storyteller, Edgerton proves that he is in full command of his craft no matter what the setting. For all collections.-Thomas L. Kilpatrick, Southern Illinois Univ. Lib, Carbondale
Joanne Wilkinson
If it had been left up to the barmy cowboys who populate Edgerton's latest novel, the West would never have been won. There's P. J. Copeland, recent graduate of the Darless Mortuary Science College, who wishes to introduce the modern method of embalming to the good citizens of Mumford Park, Colorado. His idea of a marketing ploy is to dynamite a corpse in the middle of town and claim it exploded because of the heat. There's also P. J.'s nephew, Bumpy, whose attempt to lasso a donkey almost costs him his thumb, as well as the requisite man in black, Cobb Pittman, a bounty hunter who travels with a red-eyed pit bull confined in a saddle bag--oh yes, the pit bull talks. (One wonders, is a talking dog ever a good idea?) The outlandish plot of this tall tale is almost impossible to summarize but revolves around an infamous Mormon attack on pioneers and the excavation of newly discovered cliff dwellings. Because Edgerton roams so far and wide here, his novel never quite hangs together, but he certainly delivers some hilarious set pieces. The author's many fans, accustomed to the rural North Carolina setting of Edgerton's previous five novels, may be a bit startled by this book's move west, but they'll stick around for the ride anyway.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781565128194
Publisher:
Algonquin Books of Chapel Hill
Publication date:
01/04/1995
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
250
File size:
2 MB

Meet the Author

Clyde Edgerton is the author of eight novels, five of which have been New York Times Notables. He is a professor of creative writing at the University of North Carolina at Wilmington and performs with his band, Rank Strangers. Author Web site—www.clydeedgerton.com.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >

Redeye: A Western 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Heyyy
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Hey