BN.com Gift Guide

Reds, Whites, and Blues: Social Movements, Folk Music, and Race in the United States

Overview

Music, and folk music in particular, is often embraced as a form of political expression, a vehicle for bridging or reinforcing social boundaries, and a valuable tool for movements reconfiguring the social landscape. Reds, Whites, and Blues examines the political force of folk music, not through the meaning of its lyrics, but through the concrete social activities that make up movements. Drawing from rich archival material, William Roy shows that the People's Songs movement of the 1930s and 40s, and the Civil ...

See more details below
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (8) from $18.98   
  • New (7) from $18.98   
  • Used (1) from $24.58   
Reds, Whites, and Blues: Social Movements, Folk Music, and Race in the United States

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 7.0
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 10.1
  • NOOK HD Tablet
  • NOOK HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK eReaders
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook - Course Book)
$12.99
BN.com price
(Save 43%)$22.95 List Price
Sending request ...

Overview

Music, and folk music in particular, is often embraced as a form of political expression, a vehicle for bridging or reinforcing social boundaries, and a valuable tool for movements reconfiguring the social landscape. Reds, Whites, and Blues examines the political force of folk music, not through the meaning of its lyrics, but through the concrete social activities that make up movements. Drawing from rich archival material, William Roy shows that the People's Songs movement of the 1930s and 40s, and the Civil Rights Movement of the 1950s and 60s implemented folk music's social relationships—specifically between those who sang and those who listened—in different ways, achieving different outcomes.

Roy explores how the People's Songsters envisioned uniting people in song, but made little headway beyond leftist activists. In contrast, the Civil Rights Movement successfully integrated music into collective action, and used music on the picket lines, at sit-ins, on freedom rides, and in jails. Roy considers how the movement's Freedom Songs never gained commercial success, yet contributed to the wider achievements of the Civil Rights struggle. Roy also traces the history of folk music, revealing the complex debates surrounding who or what qualified as "folk" and how the music's status as racially inclusive was not always a given.

Examining folk music's galvanizing and unifying power, Reds, Whites, and Blues casts new light on the relationship between cultural forms and social activity.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
Winner of the 2011 Charles Tilly Best Book Award, Collective Behavior and Social Movements Section of the American Sociological Association

"Although some of Roy's theoretical discussions in the early chapters should interest folk music scholars, his book will be more important to students of social movements."—Robert V. Wells, Journal of American History

"The importance of this excellent book is that it revisits these two movements and reveals once again the power of culture."—Ron Eyerman, American Journal of Sociology

"With these carefully documented and well-argued case studies, Roy makes a considerable contribution to cultural sociology in general and social movement studies in particular, and those with a background in the latter field will gain the most from the work as a whole."—Dana Sawchuk, Political Studies Review

Journal of American History
Although some of Roy's theoretical discussions in the early chapters should interest folk music scholars, his book will be more important to students of social movements.
— Robert V. Wells
American Journal of Sociology
The importance of this excellent book is that it revisits these two movements and reveals once again the power of culture.
— Ron Eyerman
Journal of American History - Robert V. Wells
Although some of Roy's theoretical discussions in the early chapters should interest folk music scholars, his book will be more important to students of social movements.
American Journal of Sociology - Ron Eyerman
The importance of this excellent book is that it revisits these two movements and reveals once again the power of culture.
Political Studies Review - Dana Sawchuk
With these carefully documented and well-argued case studies, Roy makes a considerable contribution to cultural sociology in general and social movement studies in particular, and those with a background in the latter field will gain the most from the work as a whole.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

Meet the Author

William G. Roy is professor and chair of the sociology department at the University of California, Los Angeles. He is the author of "Socializing Capital" (Princeton) and "Making Societies".

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Preface ix
Chapter One: Social Movements, Music, and Race 1
Chapter Two: Music and Boundaries: Race and Folk 28
Chapter Three: The Original Folk Project 49
Chapter Four: White and Black Reds: Building an Infrastructure 79
Chapter Five: Movement Entrepreneurs and Activists 100
Chapter Six: Organizing Music: The Fruits of Entrepreneurship 126
Chapter Seven: The Highlander School 155
Chapter Eight: Music at the Heart of the Quintessential Social Movement 181
Chapter Nine: A Movement Splintered 213
Chapter Ten: How Social Movements Do Culture 234
Appendix: Coding of Songbooks and Song Anthologies 251
Notes 253
References 263
Index 277

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)