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Redux: Designs that Reveal, Recycle, and Redefine
     

Redux: Designs that Reveal, Recycle, and Redefine

by Jennifer Roberts
 

Redux offers a host of solutions for creating a green home with recycled, reused, and environmentally healthy materials, whether remodeling, redecorating, or building from the ground up. This book combines extensive salvage use with the larger goal of efficiency and environmentalism--and the results are simply stunning.

Overview

Redux offers a host of solutions for creating a green home with recycled, reused, and environmentally healthy materials, whether remodeling, redecorating, or building from the ground up. This book combines extensive salvage use with the larger goal of efficiency and environmentalism--and the results are simply stunning.

Editorial Reviews

Library Journal
These books take a look at the reuse of materials for the home, each with a slightly different approach. Obolensky (The Not So Big House) presents the reuse of materials as a way of saving money. She describes 27 homes located across the United States that have either been renovated, adapted from other spaces, enlarged by additions, or newly constructed and explains how builders and inhabitants approached the design. Color photos show the completed dwellings with captions pointing out the cost-saving details (e.g., formica countertops, prefab cabinets). Roberts (Good Green Homes) examines "green" design-homes that are eco-sensitive, energy efficient, made of recycled materials, and yet comfortable and attractive. She visits 11 homes that have been renovated, adapted from another use, or newly constructed. Sidebars provide tips on finding recycled building materials and organizations involved in eco-sensitive design as well as explanations of the complications that can arise from constructing an energy-efficient home. A resource guide provides a wealth of contacts for locating builders, architects, and designers and suppliers of energy-efficient and recycled building materials. Both books are recommended for academic, professional, and large public library collections. Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781586857011
Publisher:
Smith, Gibbs Publisher
Publication date:
10/07/2005
Pages:
160
Product dimensions:
9.75(w) x 8.50(h) x 0.68(d)
Age Range:
18 Years

Read an Excerpt

From a green point of view, renovation has a lot going for it.

Reusing a home rather than building from the ground up means you're not encroaching on wildlands or farmlands. Reuse also takes advantage of existing infrastructure - roads, utility lines, sewer services and the like. And unless you're doing a gut remodel that strips the building to its skeleton, reuse uses a lot less stuff, from lumber and drywall to nails and screws.

But don't confuse a regular renovation with a green renovation. Eco-friendly reuse means renovating not just with an eye to updating interiors or adding rooms, but with an emphasis on slashing energy use, protecting natural resources and providing healthy indoor air quality.

Ratchet Up the Reuse

Reusing an existing building is a good green strategy, but why stop there? Ratchet up the reuse by getting creative with salvaged and recycled materials as you renovate your home. Depending on your tastes, your reuse of old stuff can be subtle or bold, as you'll see in the four homes featured in this section.

In the chapter "Modernism Redux," bamboo cabinet faces conceal cabinet boxes made of strawboard - similar to particleboard but made from waste straw. Stealth reuse, you might call it. "No House Is an Island" takes us to a Martha's Vineyard home renovated with wood reclaimed from river bottoms and old beer-brewing tanks. What stands out is fine craftsmanship and gorgeous wood, not any sense that the home is built from salvage.

Meet the Author

Jennifer Roberts launched two retail stores in San Francisco specalizing in environmentally sensible consumer products, including household goods; amd is freelance writer and editor on topics that include energy-efficient building design and systems.

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