Reference and Information Services in the 21st Century / Edition 2

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Overview

There are over 1,000 reference resources listed in this book. The hybridization of information sources, the multiplication and diversification of reference services, and the sheer exuberance of communicable information make the constant updating of resources an imperative. Readers and practitioners who come upon an interesting new relevant resource, trend, or a change in existing resources not noted by the authors are invited to send in the information to 21reference@gmail.com. Updates, new annotated bibliographies, and any emerging trends will be added to this site biannually in January and August of each year, beginning in January 2010.

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Editorial Reviews

Doody's Review Service
Reviewer: Kathryn L. Fowler, MLS RN-BC(UPMC Passavant)
Description: This book is intended to be a reference librarian's guide to answering the question, "Where do I begin to make changes or develop any of the areas under my purview?" The book is broken into four major subject headings with 21 chapters, each concluding with an extensive bibliography. This edition covers similar, if not the same, topics as the 2006 edition, with updated references.
Purpose: The authors seek to link their readers to the resources they need to answer the questions they get at the reference desk and within the department.
Audience: This book would benefit future librarians in a reference class as well as librarians transferring between disciplines who are not familiar with resources. It also could provide managers and administrators with ideas for rethinking the "it has always been done this way" tendency at their institutions. Both authors have the background and experience to provide with authority an insider's view of the reference department.
Features: Each topic is covered in a few pages. Among the topics are locating the best sources for collections, developing staff to use the resources and interact with the public, and finding the answer to the question that the patron perhaps did not articulate. Rather than one index, there are two (subject and reference resources), which makes searching through the book much easier. All of the black-and-white screenshots are clear and include attribution.
Assessment: Although the information is relevant, the book only skims each topic. I would have preferred fewer topics covered in more depth, or perhaps the same number of topics in a multiple volume edition. With a larger publication, the needs of the collection, users, management, and librarians could have been covered in more depth, increasing the book's usefulness.
From The Critics
Reviewer: Kathryn L. Fowler, MLS RN-BC(UPMC Passavant)
Description: This book is intended to be a reference librarian's guide to answering the question, "Where do I begin to make changes or develop any of the areas under my purview?" The book is broken into four major subject headings with 21 chapters, each concluding with an extensive bibliography. This edition covers similar, if not the same, topics as the 2006 edition, with updated references.
Purpose: The authors seek to link their readers to the resources they need to answer the questions they get at the reference desk and within the department.
Audience: This book would benefit future librarians in a reference class as well as librarians transferring between disciplines who are not familiar with resources. It also could provide managers and administrators with ideas for rethinking the "it has always been done this way" tendency at their institutions. Both authors have the background and experience to provide with authority an insider's view of the reference department.
Features: Each topic is covered in a few pages. Among the topics are locating the best sources for collections, developing staff to use the resources and interact with the public, and finding the answer to the question that the patron perhaps did not articulate. Rather than one index, there are two (subject and reference resources), which makes searching through the book much easier. All of the black-and-white screenshots are clear and include attribution.
Assessment: Although the information is relevant, the book only skims each topic. I would have preferred fewer topics covered in more depth, or perhaps the same number of topics in a multiple volume edition. With a larger publication, the needs of the collection, users, management, and librarians could have been covered in more depth, increasing the book's usefulness.
From The Critics
Reviewer:Kathryn L Fowler, MLS(Duquesne University)
Description:This book is intended to be a reference librarian's guide to answering the question, "Where do I begin to make changes or develop any of the areas under my purview?" The book is broken into four major subject headings with 21 chapters, each concluding with an extensive bibliography. This edition covers similar, if not the same, topics as the 2006 edition, with updated references.
Purpose:The authors seek to link their readers to the resources they need to answer the questions they get at the reference desk and within the department.
Audience:This book would benefit future librarians in a reference class as well as librarians transferring between disciplines who are not familiar with resources. It also could provide managers and administrators with ideas for rethinking the "it has always been done this way" tendency at their institutions. Both authors have the background and experience to provide with authority an insider's view of the reference department.
Features:Each topic is covered in a few pages. Among the topics are locating the best sources for collections, developing staff to use the resources and interact with the public, and finding the answer to the question that the patron perhaps did not articulate. Rather than one index, there are two (subject and reference resources), which makes searching through the book much easier. All of the black-and-white screenshots are clear and include attribution.
Assessment:Although the information is relevant, the book only skims each topic. I would have preferred fewer topics covered in more depth, or perhaps the same number of topics in a multiple volume edition. With a larger publication, the needs of the collection, users, management, and librarians could have been covered in more depth, increasing the book's usefulness.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781555706722
  • Publisher: Neal-Schuman Publishers, Inc.
  • Publication date: 4/28/2009
  • Edition description: Older Edition
  • Edition number: 2
  • Pages: 461
  • Product dimensions: 5.90 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 1.20 (d)

Table of Contents

Preface xi

Acknowledgments xvii

Part I Fundamental Concepts

1 Introdution to Reference and Information Services 3

Ethical Awareness and Engagement 4

Kinds of Information Service 5

Selecting and Evaluating Print and Electronic Information 9

Creating Finding Tools and Web Sites 10

Promoting and Marketing Libraries and Reference Service 11

Evaluating Staff and Services 11

The Changing Nature of Reference 13

Recommendations for Further Reading 13

Bibliography of Works Cited in This Chapter 14

2 Determining the Question: In-person, Telephone, and Virtual Reference Interviews 15

Why Conduct the Reference Interview? 15

What We Know about the Reference Interview 16

Conducting the Reference Interview 17

Problematic Strategies in the Reference Interview 22

The Telephone Interview 24

Virtual Reference-E-mail, Chat, IM, and SMS 25

Assessment and Accountability 27

RUSA Guidelines-A New, More Integrated Approach 27

Understanding and Respecting Cultural Differences 28

Improving Our Skills 29

A Look Ahead: Striving for Excellent Service 29

Recommendations for Further Reading 30

Bibliography of Works Cited in This Chapter 31

3 Finding the Answer: Basic Search Techniques 35

Tools of the Answering Trade 36

Step 1 Categorize an Answer 36

Step 2 Vizualize an Answer 39

Step 3 Test the Waters 39

Types of Answers 41

Common Pitfalls in Reference Answering 44

Raison d'etre: Finding the Answers 52

Recommendations for Further Reading 53

Bibliography of Works Cited in This Chapter 54

Part II Introduction to Major Reference Sources

4 Answering Questions about Books, Magazines, Newspapers, Libraries and Publishing, and Bibliographic Networks-Bibliographic Resources 57

Overview 57

Major Bibliographic Resources Used in Reference Work 59

Collection Development and Maintenance 67

Further Considerations 68

Reference Resources Discussed in This Chapter 70

Recommendations for Further Reading 72

Bibliography of Works Cited in This Chapter 73

5 Answering Questions about Anything and Everything-Encyclopedias 75

Overview 75

Major Encyclopedic Resources Used in Reference Work 80

Collection Development and Maintenance 92

Further Considerations 95

Recommended Resources Discussed in This Chapter 97

Recommendations for Further Reading 99

Bibliography of Works Cited in This Chapter 100

6 Answering Questions That Require Handy Facts Ready Reference Sources 103

Overview 103

Major Ready Reference Resources Used in Reference Work 104

Collection Development and Maintenance 116

Further Considerations 117

Recommended Resources Discussed in This Chapter 119

Recommendations for Further Reading 121

Bibliography of Works Cited in This Chapter 122

7 Answering Questions about Words-Dictionaries 125

Overview 125

Major Dictionaries Used in Reference Work 127

Collection Development and Maintenance 141

Further Considerations 143

Recommended Resources Discussed in This Chapter 145

Recommendations for Further Reading 150

Bibliography of Works Cited in This Chapter 151

8 Answering Questions about Events and Issues, Past and Present-Indexes and Full-Text Databases 153

Overview 153

Major Indexes Used in Reference Work 155

Collection Development and Maintenance 169

Further Considerations 171

Final Thoughts 171

Recommended Resources Discussed in This Chapter 172

Recommendations for Further Reading 177

Bibliography of Works Cited in This Chapter 178

9 Answering Questions about Health, Law, and Business-Special Guidelines and Sources 179

Overview 179

Major Health Resources Used in Reference Work 183

Major Legal Resources Used in Reference Work 190

Major Business Resources Used in Reference Work 194

Collection Development and Maintenance 200

Further Considerations 203

Recommended Resources Discussed in This Chapter 204

Recommendations for Further Reading 209

Bibliography of Works Cited in This Chapter 211

10 Answering Questions about Geography, Countries, and Travel-Atlases, Gazetteers, Maps, Geographic Information Systems, and Travel Guides 213

Overview 213

Major Geographic Information Resources Used in Reference Work 214

Collection Development and Maintenance 223

Further Considerations 225

Recommended Resources Discussed in This Chapter 226

Recommendations for Further Reading 229

Bibliography of Works Cited in This Chapter 230

11 Answering Questions about the Lives of People-Biographical Information Sources 233

Overview 233

Major Biographical Resources Used in Reference Work 234

Collection Development and Maintenance 242

Further Considerations 243

Recommended Resources Discussed in This Chapter 245

Recommendations for Further Reading 247

Bibliography of Works Cited in This Chapter 248

12 Answering Questions about Governments-Government Information Sources 249

Overview 249

Major Government Publication Resources Used in Reference Work 251

Collection Development and Maintenance 262

Further Considerations 263

Recommended Resources Discussed in This Chapter 264

Recommendations for Further Reading 266

Bibliography of Works Cited in This Chapter 268

Part III Special Topics in Reference and Information Work

13 When and How to Use the Internet as a Reference Tool 271

The Facts 271

The Puzzle 271

The Solution 272

Nature of Internet Reference 273

Five Steps to Successful Internet Reference 278

Recommendations for Further Reading 287

Bibliography of Works Cited in This Chapter 291

14 Reader's Advisory Work Mary K. Chelton 293

Reader's Advisory and Reference: A Marriage of Convenience 293

Common RA Questions 295

The Reader's Advisory Interview 296

Common Mistakes in the RA Encounter 298

Reader's Advisory Reference Tools 300

The Top Ten RA Tools 301

Keeping Current 304

Bibliography of Works Cited in This Chapter 305

15 Reference Work with Children and Young Adults Mary K. Chelton 307

Introduction: Challenges of Working with Young Audiences 307

Special Topics in Reference and Information Work with Youth 308

Research and Assignment Topics 311

Solutions to Common Problems in Reference Work with Youth 311

Reader's Advisory Questions in Youth Reference Services 315

Conclusion 315

Bibliography of Works Cited in This Chapter 315

16 Information Literacy in the Reference Department 319

Standards for Information Literacy 320

Approaches to Information Literacy 321

Information Literacy by Type of Library 322

Social and Ethical Uses of Information 323

One-on-One Instruction 324

Information Literacy in a Classroom Setting 326

Impact of New Technology on the Teaching of Information Literacy 327

Assessment and Evaluation of Information Literacy 328

Information-Seeking Behavior 329

Further Considerations 329

Recommendations for Further Reading 330

Bibliography of Works Cited in This Chapter 333

Part IV Developing and Managing Reference Collections and Services

17 Selecting and Evaluating Reference Materials 337

Identifying, Selecting, and Evaluating New Reference Materials 339

Management of the Reference Budget 344

Ongoing Assessment of Reference Collections 344

Writing a Reference Collection Development Policy 346

Promoting and Marketing Reference Materials to Library Users 348

Recommendations for Further Reading 348

Resources Discussed in This Chapter 349

Bibliography of Works Cited in This Chapter 350

18 Managing Reference Departments 351

Of Car Designs and Learning Styles 351

Organizing Reference Departments 352

Organizing Staff 353

Management of Service Delivery 354

New Roles 357

Further Considerations 360

Recommendations for Further Reading 361

Bibliography of Works Cited in This Chapter 363

19 Assessing and Improving Reference Services 367

Why Assess 367

What to Assess 368

How to Assess 369

Acting on Assessments 382

Ongoing Assessments: An Imperative 384

Recommendations for Further Reading 385

Bibliography of Works Cited in This Chapter 387

20 Reference 2.0 389

Changing Vocabulary Attests to Changing Times 389

What Is the 2.0 Universe? 390

Cooperative Content Creation 391

Social Networking 402

Customization 404

Seamlessness 408

Concluding Remarks: The Tree of 2.0 Knowledge 412

Recommendations for Further Reading 413

Bibliography of Works Cited in This Chapter 415

21 The Future of Information Service 419

New Ways of Doing Business-Reference 2.0 420

Providing New Materials and Formats 421

Providing New Service Models 422

What Will Librarians Do? Competencies Needed 423

Planning the Future 425

What Will the Future of Reference Look Like? 426

Does Reference Have a Future? 426

Recommendations for Future Reading 427

Bibliography of Works Cited in This Chapter 428

Appendix: RUSA Outstanding Reference Sources 2005-2009 431

Subject Index 435

Index of Reference Resources Described 447

About the Authors 461

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