Refiguring Authority: Reading, Writing, and Rewriting in Cervantes

Refiguring Authority: Reading, Writing, and Rewriting in Cervantes

by E. Michael Gerli, Michael E. Gerli
     
 

In this wide-ranging study E. Michael Gerli shows how Cervantes and his contemporaries ceaselessly imitated one another — glossing works, dismembering and reconstructing them, writing for and against one another — while playing sophisticated games of literary one-upmanship.

The result was that literature in late Renaissance Spain was often more than a

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Overview

In this wide-ranging study E. Michael Gerli shows how Cervantes and his contemporaries ceaselessly imitated one another — glossing works, dismembering and reconstructing them, writing for and against one another — while playing sophisticated games of literary one-upmanship.

The result was that literature in late Renaissance Spain was often more than a simple matter of source and imitation. It must be understood as a far more subtle, palimpsest-like process of forging endless series of texts from other texts, thus linking closely the practices of reading, writing, and rewriting. Like all major writers of the age, Cervantes was responding not just to specific literary traditions but to a broad range of texts and discourses. He expected his well-read audience to recognize his sources and to appreciate their transformations.

The notion of writing as reading and reading as writing is thus central to an understanding of Cervantes' literary invention. As he created his works, he constantly questioned and reconfigured the authority of other texts, appropriating, combining, naturalizing, and effacing them, displacing them with his own themes, images, styles, and beliefs.

Modern literary theory has confirmed what Cervantes and his contemporaries intuitively knew — that reading and writing are closely linked dimensions of the literary enterprise. Reading Cervantes and his contemporaries in this way enables us to cojnprehend the craft, wit, irony, and subtle conceit that he at the heart of seventeenth-century Spanish literature.

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Editorial Reviews

Modern Philology
A thoughtful, ambitious, and, in the best sense, polemical study.
— Modern Philology
From the Publisher
"A thoughtful, ambitious, and, in the best sense, polemical study." — Modern Philology

Booknews
Gerli (Spanish, Georgetown U.) characterizes literature in late Renaissance Spain as an ongoing process of mutual imitation, literary one-upmanship, and displacement of literary authority. He describes Don Quixote as a brilliant instance of this process, observing that Cervantes' novel prefigures the work of many modern literary theorists. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780813119229
Publisher:
University Press of Kentucky
Publication date:
12/28/1995
Series:
Studies in Romance Languages
Pages:
152
Product dimensions:
5.90(w) x 9.10(h) x 0.70(d)

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