Refiguring Prose Style: Possibilities For Writing Pedagogy [NOOK Book]

Overview

For about two decades, say Johnson and Pace, the discussion of how to address prose style in teaching college writing has been stuck, with style standing in as a proxy for other stakes in the theory wars.

The traditional argument is evidently still quite persuasive to some—that teaching style is mostly a matter of teaching generic conventions through repetition and practice. Such a position usually presumes the traditional view of composition as essentially a service course, one...

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Refiguring Prose Style: Possibilities For Writing Pedagogy

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Overview

For about two decades, say Johnson and Pace, the discussion of how to address prose style in teaching college writing has been stuck, with style standing in as a proxy for other stakes in the theory wars.

The traditional argument is evidently still quite persuasive to some—that teaching style is mostly a matter of teaching generic conventions through repetition and practice. Such a position usually presumes the traditional view of composition as essentially a service course, one without content of its own. On the other side, the shortcomings of this argument have been much discussed—that it neglects invention, revision, context, meaning, even truth; that it is not congruent with research; that it ignores 100 years of scholarship establishing composition's intellectual territory beyond "service."

The discussion is stuck there, and all sides have been giving it a rest in recent scholarship. Yet style remains of vital practical interest to the field, because everyone has to teach it one way or another.

A consequence of the impasse is that a theory of style itself has not been well articulated. Johnson and Pace suggest that moving the field toward a better consensus will require establishing style as a clearer subject of inquiry.

Accordingly, this collection takes up a comprehensive study of the subject. Part I explores the recent history of composition studies, the ways it has figured and all but effaced the whole question of prose style. Part II takes to heart Elbow's suggestion that composition and literature, particularly as conceptualized in the context of creative writing courses, have something to learn from each other. Part III sketches practical classroom procedures for heightening students' abilities to engage style, and part IV explores new theoretical frameworks for defining this vital and much neglected territory.

The hope of the essays here—focusing as they do on historical, aesthetic, practical, and theoretical issues—is to awaken composition studies to the possibilities of style, and, in turn, to rejuvenate a great many classrooms.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780874215199
  • Publisher: Utah State University Press
  • Publication date: 6/15/2009
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 326
  • File size: 765 KB

Table of Contents


CONTENTS


Introduction
T. R. Johnson and Tom Pace

PART I: What Happened: The Rise and Fall of Stylistics in Composition

Introduction
Tom Pace

1. Style and the Renaissance of Composition Studies
Tom Pace

2. Where Is Style Going? Where Has It Been?
Elizabeth Weiser

3. Contextual Stylistics: Breaking Down the Binaries in Sentence-Level Pedagogy
Rebecca Moore Howard

4. Style Redux
Kathryn Flannery


PART II: Belles Lettres and Composition

Introduction
T. R. Johnson

5. The Uses of Literature
Tina Kelleher

6. Persuasion, More Than Argument: Moving Toward a Literary Sensitivity in the Classroom
Allison Alsup

7. An Arts-Centric Composition Classroom
Gabriel Gomez

8. Playing with Echo: Strategies for Teaching Repetition in the Writing Classroom
Melissa A. Goldthwaite

9. "Weird Al" Style Method: Playful Invention as Serious Pedagogy
Keith Rhodes

10. When Their Voice Is Their Problem: Using Imitation to Teach the Classroom Dialect
J. Scott Farrin


PART III: Teaching Prose Style

Introduction
Tom Pace

11. Style: The New Grammar in Composition Studies?
Nicole Amare

12. Balancing Thought and Expression: A Short Course in Style
Lisa Baird

13. Rethinking Stylistic Analysis in the Writing Class
William J. Carpenter

14. Re-Placing the Sentence: Approaching Style Through Genre
Peter Clements

15. Tutoring Taboo: A Reconsideration of Style in the Writing Center
Jesse Kavadlo


PART IV: New Definitions of Style

Introduction
T. R. Johnson

16. Rhetor-Fitting: Defining Ethics through Style
Dion C. Cautrell

17. Style as a System: Toward a Cybernetic Model of Composition Style
Drew Loewe

18. Teaching the Tropics of Inquiry in the Composition Classroom
M. Todd Harper

19. Writing with the Ear
T. R. Johnson



Notes

References

Contributors

Index

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