Reflections in a Jaundiced Eye

Overview

In this collection of essays, Florence King confirms her position as one of the wittiest social critics now writing-and certainly the most uninhibited. Nothing escapes her withering gaze, from our greatest national institution ("Democrazy"), to the cult of Helpism ("Does Your Child Taste Salty?"), to the rules of historical romance writing ("Sex and the Saxon Churl"). If caring 'n' compassion are getting you down, open this book for a refreshing whiff of vitriol.

In...

See more details below
Paperback (REV)
$16.10
BN.com price
(Save 10%)$17.99 List Price
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (36) from $1.99   
  • New (7) from $6.69   
  • Used (29) from $1.99   
Reflections In A Jaundiced Eye

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • NOOK HD/HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK Study
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$7.99
BN.com price

Overview

In this collection of essays, Florence King confirms her position as one of the wittiest social critics now writing-and certainly the most uninhibited. Nothing escapes her withering gaze, from our greatest national institution ("Democrazy"), to the cult of Helpism ("Does Your Child Taste Salty?"), to the rules of historical romance writing ("Sex and the Saxon Churl"). If caring 'n' compassion are getting you down, open this book for a refreshing whiff of vitriol.

In this collection of essays, King surveys the wide spectrum of American foolishness, leaving few sacred cows ungored. Her subjects include "helpism, " education, feminist literature, and America's most fundamental principle, "Democrazy."

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"One of the most exhilarating essayists alive: occasionally raunchy but always full of high humor, casually erudite, animated by an original and constantly surprising turn of mind." —Andrew Ferguson, The American Spectator

"Not many [authors] are worth dropping everything you're doing to read his or her new book. One of the few who makes it worthwhile is Florence King...Her essays might make you angry, but they'll also make you laugh." —Jay Strafford, Richmond News-Leader

"King is exactly on target...One of the few contemporary American essayists of sufficient pungency and wit as to be almost always worth reading." —Jonathan Yardley, Washington Post Book World

"To say that Florence King doesn't suffer fools gladly is an understatement akin to suggesting that Fred Astaire could maneuver quite nicely on the dance floor." —Joanne Kaufman, People

People Magazine
To say that Florence King doesn't suffer fools gladly is an understatement akin to suggesting that Fred Astaire could maneuver quite nicely on the dance floor.
Washington Post
. . .A Southern spinster who doesn't suffer fools gladly and likes to see fools suffer.
New York Times Book Review
This collection of humorous and satirical writings treats such subjects as "men, women, historical romance novels, computer-written letters, lesbians and martinis."
Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
King expresses her opinions with the subtletyand effectiveness of a flamethrower in her savagely funny look at American life. Whether taking aim at an institution (marriage), a movement (``Helpism'') or an individual (John Updike), she is seldom off-target and never conciliatory: ``I'd rather be a human mine sweeper in the Strait of Hormuz than read John Updike'' leaves little room for backpedaling. Even if King (Confessions of a Failed Southern Lady) were not funny herself, her ability to spot the ludicrous statements of others (a flight attendant after a hijacking attempt: ``He was very cooperative; he's almost a model hijacker'') would make her a top-of-the-line satirist. King's wit and intelligence complement a refreshing angle of attack that allows her to strike at Phyllis Schlafly and Betty Friedan with equal vigor. While readers will be alternately offended and delighted by her barbs, they will not be bored.
Library Journal
To say that King is just a mite critical of the American way of life would be putting it mildly indeed. As she writes in her first chapter, ``. . . life in America has the same effect on me as 'The Morton Downey, Jr. Show.'" Her zingers are memorable: ``If we want to regain the respect of the world,'' she writes, ``we should begin by announcing that children have no business expressing opinions on anything except `Do you have enough room in the toes?''' King weaves her Southern upbringing throughout her narrative, often through reminiscences of her family and life in the South. Blount also tackles the social fabric of America--and himself--from the point of view of a Southerner. He talks about the New South, giving up dirt-eating in the South, Southern politicians, and how to walk in New York (as opposed to other regional pedestrian styles, such as lolly-gagging, traipsing, gallivanting, and slow-loping). Wonder where he gets his ideas? Just lucky, he says: ``It was not my idea, in the first place, to be the kind of person to whom ideas come. Some people get eczema, I get ideas.'' Blount's humor elicits more grins and snickers than does King's, which is more cynical (well, she warned us in her title, didn't she?). Both offer a look at modern-day America through uniquely Southern eyes, one from the male, the other the female perspective. They are both worth reading and deserve places on the shelves of public libraries. You may even find yourself agreeing with what they have written . . . even if you're not a Southerner yourself.-- Carol Spielman Lezak, General Learning Corp., Northbrook, Ill.
Library Journal
To say that King is just a mite critical of the American way of life would be putting it mildly indeed. As she writes in her first chapter, ``. . . life in America has the same effect on me as 'The Morton Downey, Jr. Show.'" Her zingers are memorable: ``If we want to regain the respect of the world,'' she writes, ``we should begin by announcing that children have no business expressing opinions on anything except `Do you have enough room in the toes?''' King weaves her Southern upbringing throughout her narrative, often through reminiscences of her family and life in the South. Blount also tackles the social fabric of America--and himself--from the point of view of a Southerner. He talks about the New South, giving up dirt-eating in the South, Southern politicians, and how to walk in New York (as opposed to other regional pedestrian styles, such as lolly-gagging, traipsing, gallivanting, and slow-loping). Wonder where he gets his ideas? Just lucky, he says: ``It was not my idea, in the first place, to be the kind of person to whom ideas come. Some people get eczema, I get ideas.'' Blount's humor elicits more grins and snickers than does King's, which is more cynical (well, she warned us in her title, didn't she?). Both offer a look at modern-day America through uniquely Southern eyes, one from the male, the other the female perspective. They are both worth reading and deserve places on the shelves of public libraries. You may even find yourself agreeing with what they have written . . . even if you're not a Southerner yourself.-- Carol Spielman Lezak, General Learning Corp., Northbrook, Ill.
The Washington Post
. . .[A] Southern spinster who doesn't suffer fools gladly and likes to see fools suffer.
NY Times Book Review
This collection of humorous and satirical writings treats such subjects as "men, women, historical romance novels, computer-written letters, lesbians and martinis."
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780312039783
  • Publisher: St. Martin's Press
  • Publication date: 2/28/1990
  • Edition description: REV
  • Pages: 208
  • Sales rank: 924,987
  • Product dimensions: 5.50 (w) x 8.50 (h) x 0.48 (d)

Meet the Author

Florence King is the author of Confessions of a Failed Southern Lady, With Charity Toward None, and other books. Though she still lives in Fredericksburg, Virginia, Washington-fed yuppies may yet drive her father into the hills.

Read More Show Less

Read an Excerpt

Reflections In A Jaundiced Eye


By Florence King

St. Martin's Griffin

Copyright © 1990 Florence King
All right reserved.

ISBN: 9780312039783

REFLECTIONS IN A JAUNDICED EYE
1AUTHOR'S NOTEIf suicide notes can be said to possess nationality, surely the most American one was left by historian Wilbur J. Cash: "I can't stand it anymore, and I don't even know what it is."In 1964, rightwing maven Phyllis Schlafly published a book called A Choice, Not an Echo in which she condemned President Lyndon B. Johnson for awarding the Medal of Freedom to the leftwing literary critic Edmund Wilson. Among her objections to Wilson, Schlafly noted: "Edmund Wilson revealed his lack of patriotism in these words from his latest book (The Cold War and the Income Tax): 'I have finally come to feel that this country, whether or not I continue to live in it, is no longer any place for me.'"It's time Schlafly knew that Alexander Hamilton said it first. In a letter to Governor Clinton of New York he wrote: "Every day proves to me more and more that this American world was not made for me." Moreover, in another letter to Rufus King, Hamilton said: "Am I a fool--a romantic Quixote--or is there a constitutional defect in the American mind?"Like all members of the God 'n' Country Club, Schlaflythinks that only leftwing teeth are set on edge by America. She's wrong. I'm slightly to the right of Baby Doc, but life in America has the same effect on me as "The Morton Downey, Jr. Show."Alexander Hamilton was neither a fool nor a romantic Quixote. According to the laws of logic, A is A; a thing cannot be other than itself; parallel lines cannot meet. Except in America, where the movement of Birnam Wood to Dunsinane is a regular occurrence in the lumberyard of our national psyche. Unstrung Americans are found in both political camps, and our common motto is: "My nerves, right or wrong."This book is about my nerves and the lumberyard. That's not a good title, however, so I called it Reflections in a jaundiced Eye.REFLECTIONS IN A JAUNDICED EYE. Copyright © 1989 by Florence King. All rights reserved. No part of this book may be used or reproduced in any manner whatsoever without written permission except in the case of brief quotations embodied in critical articles or reviews. For information, address St. Martin's Press, 175 Fifth Avenue, New York, N.Y. 10010.

Continues...

Excerpted from Reflections In A Jaundiced Eye by Florence King Copyright © 1990 by Florence King. Excerpted by permission.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)