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Reflections of a Culture Broker: A View from the Smithsonian
     

Reflections of a Culture Broker: A View from the Smithsonian

by Richard Kurin
 

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Drawing on this diverse experiences in producing exhibitions and public programs, Richard Kurin challenges culture brokers -- defined broadly to include museum professionals, filmmakers, journalists, festival producers, and scholars -- to envision the ways in which their messages can "play" to different audiences and to better understand the relationship between

Overview

Drawing on this diverse experiences in producing exhibitions and public programs, Richard Kurin challenges culture brokers -- defined broadly to include museum professionals, filmmakers, journalists, festival producers, and scholars -- to envision the ways in which their messages can "play" to different audiences and to better understand the relationship between knowledge, art, politics, and entertainment.

Editorial Reviews

Library Journal
Written by the director of the Smithsonian's Center for Folklife and Cultural Studies, this book is not an "official" accounting of Smithsonian policies, activities, and decisions but a personal essay based on firsthand knowledge. Intending to present a sorely needed casebook of professional practice for "culture brokers," Kurin offers a descriptive and analytic view of the process by which various types of major cultural presentations such as exhibits, museums, and festivals are developed, enacted, and situated. Regarding the Enola Gay controversy, he discusses the complex concept of "the search for truth and narrative" within "multiparadigmatic, deconstructed frameworks that make multiple versions of reality a fact of life." Kurin concludes that curation is process-oriented, not static, and is "a proactive effort to serve the public, increase understandability, and use the museum as a vehicle of inter- and intracultural communication." This down-to-earth, enjoyable, and thought-provoking title is highly recommended.Jennifer L.S. Moldwin, Detroit Inst. of Arts Lib.
From the Publisher
Written by the director of the Smithsonian's Center for Folklife and Cultural Studies, this book is not an "official" accounting of Smithsonian policies, activities, and decisions but a personal essay based on firsthand knowledge. Intending to present a sorely needed casebook of professional practice for "culture brokers," Kurin offers a descriptive and analytic view of the process by which various types of major cultural presentations such as exhibits, museums, and festivals are developed, enacted, and situated. Regarding the Enola Gay controversy, he discusses the complex concept of "the search for truth and narrative" within "multiparadigmatic, deconstructed frameworks that make multiple versions of reality a fact of life." Kurin concludes that curation is process-oriented, not static, and is "a proactive effort to serve the public, increase understandability, and use the museum as a vehicle of inter- and intracultural communication." This down-to-earth, enjoyable, and thought-provoking title is highly recommended.? (from Library Journal; Jennifer L.S. Moldwin, Detroit Inst. of Arts Lib. Copyright 1998 Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781560987895
Publisher:
Smithsonian Institution Press
Publication date:
11/28/1997
Pages:
315
Product dimensions:
6.35(w) x 9.27(h) x 1.07(d)

Meet the Author

Richard Kurin, formerly director of the Smithsonian's Center for Folklife Programs and Cultural Studies, is Under Secretary for History, Art, and Culture at the Smithsonian Institution.

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