The Reflections Of A Married Man

The Reflections Of A Married Man

by Robert Grant
     
 

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Many of the earliest books, particularly those dating back to the 1900s and before, are now extremely scarce and increasingly expensive. We are republishing these classic works in affordable, high quality, modern editions, using the original text and artwork.See more details below

Overview

Many of the earliest books, particularly those dating back to the 1900s and before, are now extremely scarce and increasingly expensive. We are republishing these classic works in affordable, high quality, modern editions, using the original text and artwork.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781444694352
Publisher:
Read Books Design
Publication date:
03/09/2010
Pages:
166
Product dimensions:
5.50(w) x 8.50(h) x 0.38(d)

Read an Excerpt


m. I WAS describing my house. If it be true that 1 a man's house is his castle, it is equally so that the chief seat of his domestic happiness is his parlor. I use the term advisedly, meaning by parlor the room in which his evenings are habitually spent and where he feels most thoroughly and comfortably at home, be it known technically as drawing-room, library, or den. There are people who prefer to maintain a best room for the entertainment of company, where the most magnificently ugly of their belongings are commonly to be found, and in which the window-shades are kept perpetually lowered in order to preserve the carpets, and a fire is never lighted from the dread of smoke-dust. But I agree with Josephine that what we deem comfortable is none too comfortable for our friends ; and as a consequence we have participated freely from the very first in our own splendor. REFLECTIONS OF A MARRIED MAN 33 Is there anything more attractive to the newly married Benedict than the cosiness of his evenings at home, in the midst of his household gods and by the side of his sweet partner for life ? Even though she objects to his putting his boots on the sofa or badgers him into wearing a swallow-tail coat at dinner every night, is ho not a thousand-fold happier than when flitting from ball-room to theatre and from theatre to club in search of feverish excitement ? As a well-to-do bachelor, he may perhaps have endeavored to banish dirt by the witchery of assiduous tipping, and to produce the semblance of connubial comfort by a prodigal display of choice upholstery, rare Japonica, and a masterpiece or two in the line of contemporary art; but, except in moments of occasional self-delusion, he hasever been conscious that his hearth was alike cheerless and dusty. Now, under his changed cond...

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