Reflections of an Affirmative Action Baby

Reflections of an Affirmative Action Baby

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by Stephen L. Carter
     
 

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In a climate where whites who criticize affirmative action risk being termed racist and blacks who do the same risk charges of treason and self hatred, a frank and open discussion of racial preference is difficult to achieve. But, in the first book on racial preference written from personal experience, Reflections of an Affirmative Action Baby, Stephen L. Carter,

Overview

In a climate where whites who criticize affirmative action risk being termed racist and blacks who do the same risk charges of treason and self hatred, a frank and open discussion of racial preference is difficult to achieve. But, in the first book on racial preference written from personal experience, Reflections of an Affirmative Action Baby, Stephen L. Carter, Cromwell Professor of Law at Yale University and self-described beneficiary (and, at times, victim) of affirmative action, does it. Using his own story of success and frustration as "an affirmative action baby" as a point of departure, Carter, who has risen to the top of his profession, provides an incisive analysis of one of the most incendiary topics of our day-as well as an honest critique of the pressures on black professionals and intellectuals to conform to the "politically correct" way of being black. Affirmative action as it is practiced today not only does little to promote racial equality, Carter argues, but also allows the nation to escape rather cheaply from its moral obligation to undo the legacy of slavery. Affirmative action, particularly in hiring often reinforces racist stereotypes by promoting the idea that the black professional cannot aspire to anything more than being "the best black." Has the time come to abandon these programs? No--but affirmative action must return to its simpler roots, Carter argues: to provide educational opportunities for those who might not otherwise have them. Then the beneficiaries should demand to be held to the same standards as anyone else.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Yale law professor Carter's provocative critique of affirmative action has stirred much debate and discussion. (Aug.)
Library Journal
The latest book to look at the issues facing African Americans from a point of view different from mainstream civil rights organizations, it begins with Yale law professor Carter discussing the positive and negative effects of affirmative action on his life. He then expands his study to include other topics such as the increase of racial incidents in America, dealing with political correctness and the conflicts between the mainstream liberal black community and the increasingly vocal so-called black conservatives. Like Shelby Steele's The Content of Our Character ( LJ 8/90), Carter's book is well written; unlike Steele, Carter provides lots of detailed documentation to support his ideas. A book that will find lots of readers and stir debate. For all libraries. (Index not seen.)-- Danna C. Bell-Russel, Mary mount Univ. Libs., Arlington, Va.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780465068692
Publisher:
Basic Books
Publication date:
01/28/1991
Edition description:
Reprint
Pages:
300
Sales rank:
1,221,599
Product dimensions:
5.16(w) x 8.00(h) x 0.72(d)
Lexile:
1450L (what's this?)

What People are saying about this

James E. Ellis
Fascinating....Carter thumbs his nose at solutions offered by the right...and by the left.

Meet the Author

Stephen L. Carter is William Nelson Cromwell Professor of Law at Yale University. Once a clerk to former Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall, today Carter is among the nation’s leading experts on constitutional law.

Brief Biography

Hometown:
Connecticut
Date of Birth:
October 26, 1954
Place of Birth:
Washington, D.C.
Education:
B.A. Stanford University, 1976; J.D., Yale Law School, 1979

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Reflections of an Affirmative Action Baby 2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book was not written by Stephen L. Carter, nor was it published in 1968. Please fix this so that potential readers have the proper information and can make an informed choice on whether to read this book.