Reflections on the Revolution in France (Barnes & Noble Library of Essential Reading) by Edmund Burke, NOOK Book (eBook) | Barnes & Noble
Reflections on the Revolution in France (Barnes & Noble Digital Library)

Reflections on the Revolution in France (Barnes & Noble Digital Library)

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by Edmund Burke
     
 

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Edmund Burke’s Reflections on the Revolution in France (1790) is the undisputed foundation of modern conservatism. It is a brilliant pamphlet against the French Revolution, one rooted in the solid ground of a practical political philosophy. Burke’s central argument is that the French Revolution was driven by a utopian

Overview

Edmund Burke’s Reflections on the Revolution in France (1790) is the undisputed foundation of modern conservatism. It is a brilliant pamphlet against the French Revolution, one rooted in the solid ground of a practical political philosophy. Burke’s central argument is that the French Revolution was driven by a utopian egalitarianism, which was dangerously disconnected from the actual experience of politics. A conservative, he grants centrality to the practical rationality of existing socio-political traditions and institutions, criticizes radical changes at all costs, and advocates gradual political reforms.

 

“But what is liberty without wisdom, and without virtue? It is the greatest of all possible evils; for it is folly, vice, and madness, without tradition or restraint.”— Edmund Burke

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781411468795
Publisher:
Barnes & Noble
Publication date:
04/16/2012
Series:
Barnes & Noble Digital Library
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
272
Sales rank:
867,238
File size:
428 KB

Meet the Author



Edmund Burke was an outstanding politician, polemicist, and political thinker, as well as a theorist of aesthetics and literature. Born in Dublin in 1729, he graduated from Trinity College in 1748. From there, he moved to London with the intention of studying law at the Inns of Court, but soon abandoned his studies to pursue a career in literature.  Soon he was moving in the artistic circle of Joshua Reynolds, Samuel Johnson, David Garrick, and Oliver Goldsmith.. In 1756, Burke published A Vindication of Natural Society, a satire that took issue with the rationalist principles of the Enlightenment. In 1757, he wrote a short treatise that laid the groundwork for a new conception of aesthetics that would influence, among others, Immanuel Kant.

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Reflections on the Revolution in France 3.7 out of 5 based on 1 ratings. 6 reviews.
Anonymous 8 months ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Amazing <br> Well written <br> Fantastically done <br> Uber-good <br> Lovely vocabulary <br> <br> <br> ~Christine
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is an easily navigable treatise on what a British statesman thought of what was happening in France during the French Revolution, in the form of letters written to an acquaintance in France. This was a wonderful read.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is one of those books that always comes with the word "classic" attached to it, so I'm assuming that my "not getting it" has more to do with me than Mr. Burke. Nevertheless, how he can justify being so hell-bent against the French Revolution and at the same time so for the American Revolution escapes me. The French revolt against a sitting King was entirely unjustified according to Burke (although the English Revolution of a century earlier against a seating King was completely justified. Go figure.) Thomas Paine's "Rights of Man," written as a response to this book, makes a lot more sense, seems to have much more logical arguments, and doesn't read as nearly as dated as this.