Regency Buck

Regency Buck

4.1 42
by Georgette Heyer
     
 

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Celebrate the 80th birthday of Regency Romance with great books from Sourcebooks Casablanca!

An altogether unsatisfactory arrangement

After their father's death, Miss Judith Taverner and her brother Peregrine travel to London to meet their guardian, Lord Worth, expecting an elderly gentleman. To their surprise and utter disgust, their guardian is not

Overview

Celebrate the 80th birthday of Regency Romance with great books from Sourcebooks Casablanca!

An altogether unsatisfactory arrangement

After their father's death, Miss Judith Taverner and her brother Peregrine travel to London to meet their guardian, Lord Worth, expecting an elderly gentleman. To their surprise and utter disgust, their guardian is not much older than they are, doesn't want the office of guardian any more than they want him, and is determined to thwart all their interests and return them to the country.

With altogether too many complications

But when Miss Taverner and Peregrine begin to move in the highest social circles, Lord Worth cannot help but entangle himself with his adventuresome wards...

What Reviewers Say About Regency Buck:

"Clever!"
Library Journal

"Georgette Heyer is unbeatable."
Sunday Telegraph

"Light and frothy, in the vein of the author's other Regency novels, this follows the fortunes of Miss Judith Taverner and her brother, Sir Peregrine. A good introduction to Heyer's period stories..."
The Booklist

"Reading Georgette Heyer is the next best thing to reading Jane Austen."
Publishers Weekly

What Readers Say About Regency Buck:

"A writer of great wit and style... I've read her books to ragged shreds"
Katie Fenton, Daily Telegraph

"The conversation sparkles, the characters are real, and the descriptions stand before you. Can't miss it."

"It makes you believe in love all over again."

"Wonderful characters, elegant, witty writing, perfect period detail, and rapturously romantic. Georgette Heyer achieves what the rest of us only aspire too."
Katie Fforde

"Wholly captivating!"

"I have read all of Georgette Heyer's books, and Regency Buck remains my favorite-after a few dozen readings! The mysterious plot, the wonderful dialogue, the splendid Regency settings, the chemistry between the impulsive heroine and the sardonic hero-all these add up to a Regency masterpiece and the ultimate rainy night comfort read!"

"Georgette Heyer has no equal when it comes to that wonderful brand of Regency fun and laughter. Her research is so true to that age I feel as though I am riding in Hyde Park with the characters, or on the battlefield at Waterloo, Regency Buck lead me to read An Infamous Army and many of her other wonderful books."

Editorial Reviews

Library Queue
This is a perfect read for a cold and rainy day--a romance with a little mystery thrown in... I thoroughly enjoyed this and can't wait to read more of Heyer's works.
— Patricia Seguine
A Book Blogger's Diary
[A]s always, somehow Heyer's heroine manages to time and again smash those pre-conceived notions and blaze a unique trail of her own. This is, by far, my favorite part of her books. Judith's character is one of the best representations of this Heyer trait.
— Rashmi
Curled Up With a Good Book
Regency Buck is certainly worth adding to your Heyer library.
— Helen Hancox
Becky's Book Blog
I love Worth and Judith. I love the rich-layers of Regency Buck...
— Rebecca Laney
DearAuthor.com
I love it for its amazingly accurate historical detail and for its hero and heroine. I love Worth and Judith both.
Library Journal
Judith Taverner and her brother, Peregrine, are orphans. The death of their eccentric father left them well provided for but consigned to the guardianship of a man they have never met, Julian St. John Audley, Lord Worth. When repeated requests for an introduction to him go unanswered, they set off to London to force a meeting. En route, they spend the night in the village of Grantham, where they make the acquaintance of their Uncle Bernard. Judith and Perry, knowing that their father had disowned his brother many years ago are reluctant to acknowledge the relationship, but Bernard proves to be polite and charming. They also run afoul of an arrogant aristocrat when Perry mishandles a borrowed gig on the road and causes a near-accident. On reaching London, Judith and Perry are amazed and horrified to discover that the insufferable nobleman who made their lives a misery in Grantham is none other than Lord Worth himself. The plot is sufficiently clever and complicated to keep the listener guessing, but the characters are not as appealing as those in some of Heyer's other Regencies. Worth never really becomes human; he is annoyingly arrogant and omniscient, keeping his feelings, as well as a couple of vital facts, hidden from the heroine and the listener alike. Judith, not allowed to overcome the conventions of her romance heroine role, never becomes a decisive character. June Barrie handles the various voices and accents well but unremarkably. A secondary purchase in libraries where Heyer's works (e.g., Cotillion) are popular and the budget allows. Barbara Rhodes, Northeast Texas Lib. Syst., Garland Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.
From the Publisher
"This is a perfect read for a cold and rainy day--a romance with a little mystery thrown in... I thoroughly enjoyed this and can't wait to read more of Heyer's works." - Library Queue

"[A]s always, somehow Heyer's heroine manages to time and again smash those pre-conceived notions and blaze a unique trail of her own. This is, by far, my favorite part of her books. Judith's character is one of the best representations of this Heyer trait." - A Book Blogger's Diary

"I love Worth and Judith. I love the rich-layers of Regency Buck..." - Becky's Book Blog

"Regency Buck is certainly worth adding to your Heyer library." - Curled Up With a Good Book

" I love it for its amazingly accurate historical detail and for its hero and heroine. I love Worth and Judith both." - DearAuthor.com

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781402235955
Publisher:
Sourcebooks
Publication date:
08/01/2008
Series:
Regency Romances , #2
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
416
Sales rank:
73,309
File size:
1 MB

Read an Excerpt

Excerpt from Chapter One

Newark was left behind and the post-chaise-and-four entered on a stretch of f lat country which offered little to attract the eye, or occasion remark. Miss Taverner withdrew her gaze from the landscape and addressed her companion, a fair youth who was lounging in his corner of the chaise somewhat sleepily surveying the back of the nearest post-boy.

'How tedious it is to be sitting still for so many hours at a stretch!' she remarked. 'When do we reach Grantham, Perry?'

Her brother yawned. 'Lord, I don't know! It was you who would go to London.'

Miss Taverner made no reply to this, but picked up a Traveller's Guide from the seat beside her, and began to flutter the leaves over. Young Sir Peregrine yawned again, and observed that the new pair of wheelers, put in at Newark, were good-sized strengthy beasts, very different from the last pair, which had both of them been touched in the wind.

Miss Taverner was deep in the Traveller's Guide, and agreed to this without raising her eyes from the closely printed page. She was a fine young woman, rather above the average height, and had been used for the past four years to hearing herself proclaimed a remarkably handsome girl. She could not, however, admire her own beauty, which was of a type she was inclined to despise. She had rather have had black hair; she thought the fairness of her gold curls insipid. Happily, her brows and lashes were dark, and her eyes which were startlingly blue (in the manner of a wax doll, she once scornfully told her brother) had a directness and a fire which gave a great deal of character to her face. At first glance one might write her down a mere Dresden china miss, but a second glance would inevitably discover the intelligence in her eyes, and the decided air of resolution in the curve of her mouth.

She was dressed neatly, but not in the first style of fashion, in a plain round gown of French cambric, frilled round the neck with scolloped lace; and a close mantle of twilled sarcenet. A pokebonnet of basket-willow with a striped velvet ribbon rather charmingly framed her face, and a pair of York tan gloves were drawn over her hands, and buttoned tightly round her wrists.

Her brother, who had resumed his slumbrous scrutiny of the post-boy's back, resembled her closely. His hair was more inclined to brown, and his eyes less deep in colour than hers, but he must always be known for her brother. He was a year younger than Miss Taverner, and, either from habit or carelessness, was very much in the habit of permitting her to order things as she chose.

'It is fourteen miles from Newark to Grantham,' announced Miss Taverner, raising her eyes from the Traveller's Guide. 'I had not thought it had been so far.' She bent over the book again. 'It says here - it is Kearsley's Entertaining Guide, you know, which you procured for me in Scarborough - that it is a neat and populous town on the River Witham. It is supposed to have been a Roman station, by the remains of a castle which have been dug up. I must say, I should like to explore there if we have the time, Perry.'

'Oh, lord, you know ruins always look the same!' objected Sir Peregrine, digging his hands into the pockets of his buckskin breeches. 'I tell you what it is, Judith: if you're set on poking about all the castles on the way we shall be a full week on the road. I'm all for pushing forward to London.'

'Very well,' submitted Miss Taverner, closing the Traveller's Guide, and laying it on the seat. 'We will bespeak an early breakfast at the George, then, and you must tell them at what hour you will have the horses put-to.'

'I thought we were to lie at the Angel,' remarked Sir Peregrine. 'No,' replied his sister decidedly. 'You have forgot the wretched account the Mincemans gave us of the comfort to be had there. It is the George and I wrote to engage our rooms, on account of Mrs Minceman warning me of the fuss and to-do she had once when they would have had her go up two pair of stairs to a miserable apartment at the back of the house.'

Sir Peregrine turned his head to grin amicably at her. 'Well, I don't fancy they'll succeed in fobbing you off with a back room, Ju.'

'Certainly not,' replied Miss Taverner, with a severity some - what belied by the twinkle in her eye.

'No, that's certain,' pursued Peregrine. 'But what I'm waiting to see, my love, is the way you'll handle the old man.'

Miss Taverner looked a little anxious. 'I could handle Papa, Perry, couldn't I? If only Lord Worth is not a subject to gout! I think that was the only time when Papa became quite un manageable.'

'All old men have gout,' said Peregrine. Miss Taverner sighed, acknowledging the truth of this pronouncement.

'It's my belief,' added Peregrine, 'that he don't want us to come to town. Come to think of it, didn't he say so?'

Miss Taverner loosened the strings of her reticule, and groped in it for a slender packet of letters. She spread one of these open. '"Lord Worth presents his compliments to Sir Peregrine and Miss Taverner and thinks it inadvisable for them to attempt the fatigues of a journey to London at this season. His lordship will do himself the honour of calling upon them in Yorkshire when next he is in the North." And that,' concluded Miss Taverner, 'was written three months ago - you may see the date for yourself, Perry: 29th June, 1811 - and not even in his own hand. I am sure it is a secretary wrote it, or those horrid lawyers. Depend upon it, Lord Worth has forgotten our very existence, because you know all the arrangements about the money we should have were made by the lawyers, and whenever there is any question to be settled it is they who write about it. So if he does not like us to come to London it is quite his fault for not having made the least attempt to come to us, or to tell us what we must do. I think him a very poor guardian. I wish my father had named one of our friends in Yorkshire, someone we are acquainted with. It is very disagreeable to be under the gover - nance of a stranger.'

'Well, if Lord Worth don't want to be at the trouble of ordering our lives, so much the better,' said Peregrine. 'You want to cut a dash in town, and I daresay I can find plenty of amusement if we haven't a crusty old guardian to spoil the fun.'

'Yes,' agreed Miss Taverner, a trifle doubtfully. 'But in common civility we must ask his permission to set up house in London. I do hope we shall not find him set against us, regarding it as an imposition, I mean; perhaps thinking that my uncle might rather have been appointed than himself. It must appear very singular to him. It is an awkward business, Perry.'

A grunt being the only response to this, she said no more, but leaned back in her corner and perused the unsatisfactory communications she had received from Lord Worth. It was an awkward business. His lordship, who must, she reflected, be going on for fifty-five or fifty-six years of age, showed a marked disinclination to trouble himself with the affairs of his wards, and although this might in some circumstances be reckoned a good, in others it must be found to be a pronounced evil. Neither she nor Peregrine had ever been farther from home than to Scarborough. They knew nothing of London, and had no acquaintance there to guide them. The only persons known to them in the whole town were their uncle, and a female cousin living respectably, but in a small way, in Kensington. This lady Miss Taverner must rely upon to present her into society, for her uncle, a retired Admiral of the Blue, had lived upon terms of such mutual dislike and mistrust with her father as must preclude her from seeking either his support or his acquaintance.

Meet the Author

The late Georgette Heyer was a very private woman. Her historical novels have charmed and delighted millions of readers for decades, though she rarely reached out to the public to discuss her works or private life. It is known that she was born in Wimbledon in August 1902, and her first novel, The Black Moth, was published in 1921.

Heyer published 56 books over the next 53 years, until her death from lung cancer in 1974. Heyer's large volume of works included Regency romances, mysteries and historical fiction. Known also as the Queen of Regency romance, Heyer was legendary for her research, historical accuracy and her extraordinary plots and characterizations. Her last book, My Lord John, was published posthumously in 1975. She was married to George Ronald Rougier, a mining engineer, and they had one son together, Richard.
Georgette Heyer's novels have charmed and delighted millions of readers for decades. English Heritage has awarded Georgette Heyer one of their prestigious Blue Plaques, designating her Wimbledon home as the residence of an important figure in British history. She was born in Wimbledon in August 1902. She wrote her first novel, The Black Moth, at the age of seventeen to amuse her convalescent brother; it was published in 1921 and became an instant success.

Heyer published 56 books over the next 53 years, until her death from lung cancer in 1974. Her last book, My Lord John, was published posthumously in 1975. A very private woman, she rarely reached out to the public to discuss her works or personal life. Her work included Regency romances, mysteries and historical fiction. Known as the Queen of Regency romance, Heyer was legendary for her research, historical accuracy and her extraordinary plots and characterizations. She was married to George Ronald Rougier, a barrister, and they had one son, Richard.

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Regency Buck 4.1 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 40 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is a great read! Once I got past the boxing match at the beginning of the novel, it was smooth sailing. I love the hero and heroine in this book, and the fascinating attention to regency detail! Everything is delightful, from Beau Brummel, to the way everyone's dress is described, and even descriptions of taking snuff. The mystery in it is wonderful, and it has perhaps the best ending of any Georgette Heyer that I've read so far. As always, it's wonderful, clean romance! A dream come true for any Jane Austen fan!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is one of my favorites next to The Grand Sophia. Great and engaging storyline from chapter one to the end. A must read if looking for romance, comedy and adventure. 
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is an accurate look at the haut ton of the Regency. some of the minor characters were real people who happened to wander into Ms. Heyer's creation. Her research and dialogue express the period well. Heroine and hero are well matched and appear in later book "An Infamous Army" about Waterloo. Enjoyable piece of froth with hint of danger,
BeckyJo70 More than 1 year ago
I came across this book at the library. I was looking for a historical fiction piece, and I liked the front cover. It was advertised to be in the same category as Jane Austin (My mind went to Julie Klassen – Love her!). This is the first book by Georgette Heyer that I have read. I liked the time period and Heyer’s descriptions of the scenery, clothing, and characters. The book flowed at a steady pace, but I think I may have missed something because this is book three in the series. Judith is a bit of a free spirit who doesn’t like to be told she can’t do something. She doesn’t observe the social rules of the day by choice, and it shows her immaturity. There is a good amount of conflict between Judith and Lord Worth, her guardian, and there is a bit of a mystery of who she should trust. Should she trust her cousin or her guardian? With the recent death of her father, Judith needs to think about which man has her best interest at heart. Being wealthy, both men (as well as many others) would benefit from a union with Judith Taverner. The male characters are very different. Perry is young and reckless. If he were alive today, he would be a drinker and drug user, yet he wouldn’t be malicious. He is ignorant of how life works, and he wants to experience everything it offers. Lord Worth is a proud, wise man who doesn’t communicate. He withholds a lot of information, but he is well connected and respected in society. He is abrasive, controlling, and in today’s society, he’s a first-class jerk. The Taverner’s cousin, on the other hand, is a good communicator. He is expressive and seems to be a good friend, but we never quite know what is truly going on in his head. He is not part of high society. There were other male characters, but these were the most prevalent ones. There is also a mystery to solve in this book because someone is trying to kill one of the Taverners. The mystery and the pursuit of Judith’s hand in marriage move this book along at a nice, steady pace. This book brings out how important it was to marry for money and status rather than for love. Something that took me a few pages to figure out is that Peregrine is Perry. I have never heard of the name Peregrine prior to this book. Although this book was republished in 1999 (first publication was in 1935), the author passed away in 1974, so the book is several decades old. There was a bit of a language barrier possibly for that reason. There were things I didn’t understand; the humor was one thing. Another thing I didn’t understand was the “taking of snuff.” It seemed like they sniffed it up their noses. Really? And women? Yuck! The bottom line is that this is a good book. I enjoyed it, but I wouldn’t say that I loved it. http://agardenofdelight.blogspot.com/
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Intrigue, romance, humor, all rolled into a tempo that paced itself well and didn't drag.
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I've read about half of Georgette Heyer's books...this is one of my new favorites.
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