Reggie Jackson: The Life and Thunderous Career of Baseball's Mr. October

Overview

Baseball Hall of Famer Reggie Jackson earned the nickname "Mr. October" for the crucial clutch hitting that led his teams to the World Series six times and won him two series MVP awards, and this skill at the plate is perhaps what he is best remembered for. But behind the bat was a man many don't know—a man struggling to find his place in the world, at home, and in the sport that made him a star. Now, in the first biography of Jackson in more than twenty-five years—and the first to cover his entire career as a ...

See more details below
This Hardcover is Not Available through BN.com
Note: This is a bargain book and quantities are limited. Bargain books are new but may have slight markings from the publisher and/or stickers showing their discounted price. More about bargain books
Sending request ...

Overview

Baseball Hall of Famer Reggie Jackson earned the nickname "Mr. October" for the crucial clutch hitting that led his teams to the World Series six times and won him two series MVP awards, and this skill at the plate is perhaps what he is best remembered for. But behind the bat was a man many don't know—a man struggling to find his place in the world, at home, and in the sport that made him a star. Now, in the first biography of Jackson in more than twenty-five years—and the first to cover his entire career as a player—FOXSports.com columnist Dayn Perry provides an intimate, honest, and never-before-seen glimpse into the life and times of one of baseball's all-time greats.

A cantankerous man full of swagger with a fearsome talent to match, Jackson was an outspoken iconoclast as a player—a gift that made him friends and enemies of some of the most colorful characters in the game. As large a presence on the field as he was outside the ballpark, Jackson backed up his talk by establishing himself as one of the best sluggers the sport has ever seen.

Yet Jackson's story is about more than sports prowess. His life reflects a time, between Jackie Robinson and Ken Griffey, Jr., when black ballplayers were accepted but still considered inferior to their white teammates. There were unspoken rules to keep the racial waters still; Jackson not only ignored such conventions, he demolished them—paving the way for true equality for all black players.

From his childhood in a predominantly white neighborhood to heroics at the plate, from relationships with legendary players such as "Catfish" Hunter and Thurman Munson to battles with some of the sport's most powerful figures, including notoriously cheap Oakland A's owner Charlie Finley and the irascible George Steinbrenner, Reggie Jackson tells the full story of the man who was one of the first black baseball superstars—and one of the greatest players of all time.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Kirkus Reviews
A well-rounded treatment of one of baseball's most celebrated and controversial figures. In the first Reggie Jackson biography in years, Foxsports.com baseball columnist Perry (Winners: How Good Baseball Teams Become Great Ones, 2006) reaffirms the notion that when it comes to sports superstardom, monstrous talent combined with enigmatic character truly yields the stuff of legend. Few Hall of Famers have done it with the path-breaking mix of panache, bombast and raw achievement that defined Jackson's career. Looking back on Jackson's childhood-his parents were largely absent-the author argues that he "was a lonely child grown into a lonely man," and he explores Jackson's roots alongside fleshy chapters detailing his turbulent years in Oakland and New York. Walking away with 563 home runs, 1,702 RBIs, 14 All-Star trips, five World Series rings and two World Series MVPs, "Mr. October"-the moniker was somewhat wryly bestowed, writes Perry, by then-teammate Thurman Munson prior to Jackson's historic three home runs in three swings in Game Six of the 1977 World Series-also had broken sports' racial barrier in unprecedented ways. Infamous for portraying himself as his own biggest fan, Jackson refused to take lightly his mistreatment at the hands of Billy Martin, George Steinbrenner, Charlie Finley and others. In June 1977, railing after Martin removed him from the field mid-inning, Jackson lamented to a group of writers that the "Yankees are Ruth and Gehrig and DiMaggio and Mantle. I'm a nigger to them, and I just don't know how to be subservient. I'm making seven hundred thousand dollars a year, and they treat me like dirt." Interestingly, though, Perry points out Jackson's repeated reluctance to serve as a black icon, wishing instead to be appreciated for his talents and compensated in a fashion befitting his white teammates. A provocative portrait sure to win as many fans and detractors as its red-hot subject. Agent: Sydelle Kramer/Susan Rabiner Literary Agency
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781616885434
  • Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
  • Publication date: 5/11/2010
  • Pages: 326
  • Product dimensions: 5.90 (w) x 9.10 (h) x 1.30 (d)

Meet the Author

Dayn Perry wrote for ESPN.com and Baseball Prospectus before becoming a baseball columnist with FOXSports.com. He is the author of Winners: How Good Baseball Teams Become Great Ones, and he lives with his family in Chicago, Illinois.

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Prologue: October 18, 1977, World Series, Game Six 1

1 "Aspirations" 8

2 "He Looks Whiter All the Time" 17

3 "Yes, Sir" 25

4 "I'm Not Working in One of Those Birmingham Steel Mills" 40

5 "If I Played in New York, They'd Name a Candy Bar After Me" 50

6 "Fuck You" 61

7 "The Worst Feeling I've Ever Had … Was the Day We Won the World Series" 81

8 "Superstar, My Ass" 93

9 "My Objective Right Now Is Money" 112

10 "Isn't My Name Reggie Jackson?" 132

11 "I Ain't Going" 147

12 "We Are Going on This Venture Together" 158

13 "Reggie Challenged Him in Every Way" 172

14 "I'm the Straw That Stirs the Drink" 177

15 "I'm a Nigger to Them, and I Just Don't Know How to Be Subservient" 188

16 "Reg-gie!" 208

17 "But I Know the Score Now" 215

18 "That Makes Me Angry, and It Hurts" 235

19 "I Don't Know If I'm Secure Enough and Mature Enough Not to Be the Top Banana" 244

20 "Steinbrenner Sucks!" 258

21 "Number 44, Reggie Jackson. Number 44." 272

22 "What Should I Do? Leave? Go Away? Come Back?" 278

Epilogue 291

Acknowledgments 293

Notes on Sources 295

Index 313

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)